Next Generation Leader Quotes

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Next Generation Leader: 5 Essentials for Those Who Will Shape the Future Next Generation Leader: 5 Essentials for Those Who Will Shape the Future by Andy Stanley
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Next Generation Leader Quotes Showing 1-30 of 76
“Don’t strive to be a well-rounded leader. Instead, discover your zone and stay there. Then delegate everything else.

Admitting a weakness is a sign of strength. Acknowledging weakness doesn’t make a leader less effective.

Everybody in your organization benefits when you delegate responsibilities that fall outside your core competency. Thoughtful delegation will allow someone else in your organization to shine. Your weakness is someone’s opportunity.

Leadership is not always about getting things done “right.” Leadership is about getting things done through other people.

The people who follow us are exactly where we have led them. If there is no one to whom we can delegate, it is our own fault.

As a leader, gifted by God to do a few things well, it is not right for you to attempt to do everything. Upgrade your performance by playing to your strengths and delegating your weaknesses.

There are many things I can do, but I have to narrow it down to the one thing I must do. The secret of concentration is elimination.

Devoting a little of yourself to everything means committing a great deal of yourself to nothing.

My competence in these areas defines my success as a pastor.

A sixty-hour workweek will not compensate for a poorly delivered sermon. People don’t show up on Sunday morning because I am a good pastor (leader, shepherd, counselor).

In my world, it is my communication skills that make the difference. So that is where I focus my time.

To develop a competent team, help the leaders in your organization discover their leadership competencies and delegate accordingly.

Once you step outside your zone, don’t attempt to lead. Follow.

The less you do, the more you will accomplish.

Only those leaders who act boldly in times of crisis and change are willingly followed.

Accepting the status quo is the equivalent of accepting a death sentence. Where there’s no progress, there’s no growth. If there’s no growth, there’s no life. Environments void of change are eventually void of life. So leaders find themselves in the precarious and often career-jeopardizing position of being the one to draw attention to the need for change. Consequently, courage is a nonnegotiable quality for the next generation leader.

The leader is the one who has the courage to act on what he sees.

A leader is someone who has the courage to say publicly what everybody else is whispering privately. It is not his insight that sets the leader apart from the crowd. It is his courage to act on what he sees, to speak up when everyone else is silent. Next generation leaders are those who would rather challenge what needs to change and pay the price than remain silent and die on the inside.

The first person to step out in a new direction is viewed as the leader. And being the first to step out requires courage. In this way, courage establishes leadership.

Leadership requires the courage to walk in the dark. The darkness is the uncertainty that always accompanies change. The mystery of whether or not a new enterprise will pan out. The reservation everyone initially feels when a new idea is introduced. The risk of being wrong.

Many who lack the courage to forge ahead alone yearn for someone to take the first step, to go first, to show the way. It could be argued that the dark provides the optimal context for leadership. After all, if the pathway to the future were well lit, it would be crowded.

Fear has kept many would-be leaders on the sidelines, while good opportunities paraded by. They didn’t lack insight. They lacked courage.

Leaders are not always the first to see the need for change, but they are the first to act.

Leadership is about moving boldly into the future in spite of uncertainty and risk.

You can’t lead without taking risk. You won’t take risk without courage. Courage is essential to leadership.”
Andy Stanley, Next Generation Leader: 5 Essentials for Those Who Will Shape the Future
“To ensure that we are leading with our feet firmly planted on the soil of what is, we must live by the seven commandments of current reality:

Thou shalt not pretend.
Though shalt not turn a blind eye.
Thou shalt not exaggerate.
Thou shalt not shoot the bearer of bad news.
Thou shalt not hide behind the numbers.
Thou shalt not ignore constructive criticism.
Thou shalt not isolate thyself.
Attempting to lead while turning a blind eye to reality is like treading water: It can only go on for so long, eventually you will sink. As a next generation leader, be willing to face the truth regardless of how painful it might be. And if you don’t like what you see, change it.”
Andy Stanley, Next Generation Leader: 5 Essentials for Those Who Will Shape the Future
“The primary reason we do too much is that we have never taken the time to discover that portion of what we do that makes the biggest difference.”
andy Stanley, Next Generation Leader: 5 Essentials for Those Who Will Shape the Future
“Your talent and giftedness as a leader have the potential to take you farther than your character can sustain you. That ought to scare you.”
andy Stanley, Next Generation Leader: 5 Essentials for Those Who Will Shape the Future
“Where there’s no progress, there’s no growth. If there’s no growth, there’s no life. Environments void of change are eventually void of life.”
Andy Stanley, Next Generation Leader: 5 Essentials for Those Who Will Shape the Future
“Next generation leaders are those who would rather challenge what needs to change and pay the price than remain silent and die on the inside.”
Andy Stanley, Next Generation Leader: 5 Essentials for Those Who Will Shape the Future
“The problem was that somewhere along the way I had bought into the myth that a good leader has to be good at everything. So I operated under the assumption that I had to upgrade my weaknesses into strengths. After all, who would follow a leader who wasn’t well-rounded?”
Andy Stanley, Next Generation Leader
“Let the wise listen and add to their learning, and let the discerning get guidance. (Proverbs 1:5, NIV) The way of a fool seems right to him, but a wise man listens to advice. (Proverbs 12:15, NIV) Plans fail for lack of counsel, but with many advisers they succeed. (Proverbs 15:22, NIV) Listen to advice and accept instruction, and in the end you will be wise. (Proverbs 19:20, NIV)”
Andy Stanley, Next Generation Leader
“delegation—either to time or to other people.… Transferring responsibility to other skilled and trained people enables you to give your energies to other high-leverage activities. Delegation means growth, both for individuals and for organizations.”
Andy Stanley, Next Generation Leader
“There is no necessary correlation between how busy you are and how productive you are. Being busy isn’t the same as being productive.”
Andy Stanley, Next Generation Leader
“The 80/20 Principle asserts that a minority of causes, inputs, or effort usually lead to a majority of the results, outputs, or rewards. Taken literally, this means that, for example, 80 percent of what you achieve in your job comes from 20 percent of the time spent. Thus for all practical purposes, four-fifths of the effort—a dominant part of it—is largely irrelevant.”
Andy Stanley, Next Generation Leader
“Simply recognizing the need for change does not define leadership. The leader is the one who has the courage to act on what he sees…A leader is someone who has the courage to say publicly what everybody else is whispering privately. It is not his insight that sets the leader apart from the crowd. It is his courage to act on what he sees, to speak up when everyone else is silent.”
Andy Stanley, Next Generation Leader: 5 Essentials for Those Who Will Shape the Future
“We have a tendency to measure ourselves against the people around us. They become our point of reference. A good coach will evaluate your performance against your potential.
…if we are wise enough to listen, they will help us go further, faster.”
Andy Stanley, Next Generation Leader: 5 Essentials for Those Who Will Shape the Future
“But, then, that’s the point. In leadership, success is succession.”
Andy Stanley, Next Generation Leader
“What are the two or three things that you and only you are responsible for? What, specifically, have you been hired to do? What is “success” for the person in your position? Now let’s slice it even thinner. Of the two or three things that define success for you, which of those are in line with your giftedness? Of the tasks you have been assigned to do, which of them are you specifically gifted to do?”
Andy Stanley, Next Generation Leader
“Identify the areas in which you are most likely to add unique value to your organization—something no one else can match—then leverage your skills to their absolute max. That’s what your employer expected when he put you on the payroll! More importantly, leveraging yourself generates the greatest and most satisfying return on your God-given abilities.”
Andy Stanley, Next Generation Leader
“The first thing that sometimes keeps next generation leaders from playing to their strengths is that the idea of being a balanced or well-rounded leader looks good on paper and sounds compelling coming from behind a lectern, but in reality, it is an unworthy endeavor. Read the biographies of the achievers in any arena of life. You will find over and over that these were not “well-rounded” leaders. They were men and women of focus.”
Andy Stanley, Next Generation Leader
“When the point person in an organization strives for balance, he potentially robs other leaders of an opportunity to perform at the top of their game.”
Andy Stanley, Next Generation Leader
“When a leader attempts to become well-rounded, he brings down the average of the organization’s leadership quotient—which brings down the level of the leaders around him. Don’t strive to be a well-rounded leader. Instead, discover your zone and stay there. Then delegate everything else.”
Andy Stanley, Next Generation Leader
“Every leader has authority over arenas in which he has little or no competence. When we exert our authority in an area where we lack competence, we can derail projects and demotivate those who have the skills we lack.”
Andy Stanley, Next Generation Leader
“When you try to exercise authority within a department that is outside your core competencies, you will hinder everything and everyone under your watch. If you fail to distinguish between authority and competence, you will exert your influence in ways that damage projects and people. To put it bluntly, there are things you are responsible for that you should keep your nose out of.”
Andy Stanley, Next Generation Leader
“Worse, the more successful an individual is, the less likely it is that anyone will bring this unpleasant fact to his attention. Consequently, a leader considered an expert in one area is often treated as an expert in others as well. Leaders who are not in touch with their own weaknesses feel that they are as good as anybody else in their organization at anything that pertains to leadership. Many have even bought into the false notion that great leaders have no weaknesses. In their minds, to admit weakness is to diminish their effectiveness. Such leaders tend to hide their weaknesses, assuming they ever discover them.”
Andy Stanley, Next Generation Leader
“personal shortcomings is often rooted in some sort of insecurity. This can be easy to see in others but next to impossible to see in ourselves. It takes a certain amount of personal security to admit weakness.”
Andy Stanley, Next Generation Leader
“But leadership is not always about getting things done “right.” Leadership is about getting things done through other people. Leaders miss opportunities to play to their strengths because they haven’t figured out that great leaders work through other leaders, who work through others. Leadership is about multiplying your efforts, which automatically multiplies your results.”
Andy Stanley, Next Generation Leader
“We must never forget that the people who follow us are exactly where we have led them. If there is no one to whom we can delegate, it is our own fault. Many examples in history underscore the centrality of this catalytic leadership principle. Each illustrates the fact that you never know what hangs in the balance of a decision to play to your strengths. Oddly enough, it was the prudent application of this principle that enabled the fledgling first-century church to consolidate its gains and capitalize on its explosive growth, without losing focus or momentum.”
Andy Stanley, Next Generation Leader
“Upgrade your performance by playing to your strengths and delegating your weaknesses. This one decision will do more to enhance your productivity than anything else you do as a leader.”
Andy Stanley, Next Generation Leader
“I once heard John Maxwell say, “You are most valuable where you add the most value.” It is vital to the health and success of our organizations that we as leaders discover that task, that narrow arena of responsibility where we add the most value. And once we find it, it’s even more vital that we stay there.”
Andy Stanley, Next Generation Leader
“If anything has kept me on track all these years, it’s being skewered to this principle of central focus. There are many things I can do, but I have to narrow it down to the one thing I must do. The secret of concentration is elimination. (emphasis added) As you evaluate your current leadership environment and responsibilities, what do you see that needs to be eliminated? What needs to be delegated? What would it “not be right” for you to continue doing?”
Andy Stanley, Next Generation Leader
“Several years ago I concluded that 80 percent of my professional productivity flowed from three activities: Corporate visioncasting Corporate communication Leadership development”
Andy Stanley, Next Generation Leader
“A sixty-hour workweek will not compensate for a poorly delivered sermon. People don’t show up on Sunday morning because I am a good pastor (leader, shepherd, counselor). Ironically, my pastoring skills have almost nothing to do with my success as a pastor! In my world, it is my communication skills that make the difference. So that is where I focus my time.”
Andy Stanley, Next Generation Leader

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