Sajith

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Sajith entered a giveaway
The Anxiety Code by Roger Di Pietro
The Anxiety Code: Deciphering the Purposes of Neurotic Anxiety
by Roger Di Pietro (Goodreads Author)
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The Coen Brothers by Adam Nayman
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America by Chris Hedges
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The Line Becomes A River by Francisco Cantú
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A First-Rate Madness by S. Nassir Ghaemi
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Wild by Cheryl Strayed
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Dewey by Vicki Myron
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All The Answers by Michael Kupperman
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Why We Sleep by Matthew Walker
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Scarcity by Sendhil Mullainathan
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More of Sajith's books…
John Steinbeck
“No man really knows about other human beings. The best he can do is to suppose that they are like himself.”
John Steinbeck, The Winter of Our Discontent

Harper Lee
“I think there's just one kind of folks. Folks.”
Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird

Michael Crichton
“Briefly stated, the Gell-Mann Amnesia effect is as follows. You open the newspaper to an article on some subject you know well. In Murray's case, physics. In mine, show business. You read the article and see the journalist has absolutely no understanding of either the facts or the issues. Often, the article is so wrong it actually presents the story backward—reversing cause and effect. I call these the "wet streets cause rain" stories. Paper's full of them.
In any case, you read with exasperation or amusement the multiple errors in a story, and then turn the page to national or international affairs, and read as if the rest of the newspaper was somehow more accurate about Palestine than the baloney you just read. You turn the page, and forget what you know.”
Michael Crichton

Ira Glass
“Nobody tells this to people who are beginners, I wish someone told me. All of us who do creative work, we get into it because we have good taste. But there is this gap. For the first couple years you make stuff, it’s just not that good. It’s trying to be good, it has potential, but it’s not. But your taste, the thing that got you into the game, is still killer. And your taste is why your work disappoints you. A lot of people never get past this phase, they quit. Most people I know who do interesting, creative work went through years of this. We know our work doesn’t have this special thing that we want it to have. We all go through this. And if you are just starting out or you are still in this phase, you gotta know its normal and the most important thing you can do is do a lot of work. Put yourself on a deadline so that every week you will finish one story. It is only by going through a volume of work that you will close that gap, and your work will be as good as your ambitions. And I took longer to figure out how to do this than anyone I’ve ever met. It’s gonna take awhile. It’s normal to take awhile. You’ve just gotta fight your way through.”
Ira Glass

“Even the editors of main journals themselves recognise that peer review may not be the best system ever devised by mankind. Here is what Richard Horton, the editor of The Lancet, has to say on the matter: “The mistake, of course, is to have thought that peer review was any more than a crude means of discovering the acceptability — not the validity — of a new finding. Editors and scientists alike insist on the pivotal importance of peer review. We portray peer review to the public as a quasi-sacred process that helps to make science our most objective truth teller. But we know that the system of peer review is biased, unjust, unaccountable, incomplete, easily fixed, often insulting, usually ignorant, occasionally foolish, and frequently wrong.”
Malcolm Kendrick, Doctoring Data: How to sort out medical advice from medical nonsense

105156 Downers Grove Public Library — 98 members — last activity Sep 09, 2013 02:21PM
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