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Contemporary Fiction & Authors > Current bestsellers on your to-read list

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message 1: by Reggia (new)

Reggia | 2285 comments What book on the current bestseller would you like to read next? What is it about the book that appeals to you? e.g. title, cover, storyline, place or setting, etc.


message 2: by Werner (new)

Werner | 2205 comments Truth to tell, I honestly don't pay much attention to the bestseller lists (although one of my cousins does). In my opinion, a book's presence on those lists is only a reflection of the amount of money and hype the publisher put into the advertising campaign, not of the quality of the book. (Some bestsellers do have quality --but that's purely a coincidence!) I'd much rather pick my own reading than have it picked for me by Madison Avenue. But that's just me!


message 3: by [deleted user] (new)

My friend Mary always follows the Best Seller list and always lets me know what to read next. Goodreads has had a HUGE influence on me especially the neverending quiz as I want to be able to answer all the questions. I have checked at least 20 books out of the library due it and bought at least 4. I have them stacked up and hoping to get to them at least to read the first chapter and see if I can get into them.
I always like someone to give me a hot tip on what is good. Often my sister Laurie does that. She advised me on Jodi Picoult and most recently Dewey the Library Cat (loved it) and The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time.


message 4: by Reggia (new)

Reggia | 2285 comments
...a book's presence on those lists is only a reflection of the amount of money and hype the publisher put into the advertising campaign, not of the quality of the book.


That is a very good point! One wonders if the popularity is due to the book's trendiness or just a truly good read. My local library devotes quite a large amount of space to the current bestsellers that you nearly have to walk through upon entering the library. So-o, I now peruse this section to get a peek at what I hear about online. I did pick up a nonfiction book, Geography of Bliss in that section a couple months ago, and it became one of my favorites of the year.

Usually I'm choosing the old dusty books, I still have much to catch up on as far as the classics but I'm finding recently that I sometimes get curious over all the hype of a bestseller.


message 5: by Rhonda (last edited Jan 28, 2009 07:25AM) (new)

Rhonda (rhondak) Reggia wrote: "...a book's presence on those lists is only a reflection of the amount of money and hype the publisher put into the advertising campaign, not of the quality of the book.

That is a very good point!..."

As a writer, I realize that unless you are writing in a particular genre which is popular at the moment, your chances of being published are slim to none. How these things are decided,I have no idea but it seems clear that in many cases publishers like to stretch the envelope with flash and what has come to be known as edgy, despite the fact that I prefer other less kind words for that description.
I find that many books which become popular are often poorly constructed and poorly written but they capture an audience beyond my understanding. I miss the old style book shops with dusty shelves filled with people who wanted to know things. Today I get the feeling that these have been replaced by people seeking to fill up their time.





message 6: by Reggia (new)

Reggia | 2285 comments Just wanted to make sure that Werner got the credit for that quote about "a book's presence on those lists" as I neglected to include his name when I quoted it.

I appreciate those comments, Rhonda. I think 'edginess' is just what the publishers are attempting and not only with book covers. Some of these hyped-up books contain bits of edginess that just seem to not have any place in the story; I suspect some of these details are added in to appease/please one select group of readers. When I've had enough, I always retreat to the classics. :p




message 7: by [deleted user] (new)

My friend Mare is telling me to read The Whiskey Rebels if I can find a copy. Our library doesn't have one.


message 8: by [deleted user] (new)

Hi Gabi, I also read all 14 (so far) of Janet Evanovich's Stephanie Plum books but believe me don't check out any of her too silly romances. I did! GAG! I found the first one at a second hand book store and then I was hooked. My mother even got a big kick out of Grandma Mazur. A friend at Facebook also reads her. I haven't visited her web pages just lately have you? She is so funny, cracks me up!
I also found Weiner to be funny...can't think of her first name at the moment. She wrote Good in Bed.
My husband also gets on me for staying up late online but he would never date to turn off my computer! He hates the computer and says "its the instrument of the devil"...LOL....as a joke. Did you khnow we now have God and the devil on goodreads? I was thinking about getting on as Mother Nature and lambasting those two! (they are too awful) Some want them thrown off goodreads and I guess it could happen. Now if Elvis appeared I wouldn't protest.
Wouldn't you like to go back in history and carry food to some and kick others in the shin? I can just see you kicking Henry in the shin! At the Rennie Faires I have to restrain myself from booing Henry the 8th and pelting him with slime. I happen to like Nan Bullen - Anne Boleyn right?


One for the MoneyTwo for the DoughThree To Get DeadlyGood in Bed


message 9: by [deleted user] (new)

Well, didn't find it. Which number book is it? One of her big appeals to me is her blond moments. Without them she would not be funny.


message 10: by [deleted user] (new)

Yes, I adore Lula, she is a riot. I always see her a Queen Latifa. (msp)


message 11: by [deleted user] (new)

I forget what I saw her in but she was super funny! She has just the right amount of sass too.


message 12: by Nicole (new)

Nicole | 1752 comments I tried to read a Stephanie Plum book once, but I just couldn't get into it.
I do have some things on my list that are bestsellers. I usually don't read things *just* because they're on the bestseller list. It usually takes a personal recommendation from a friend, an interesting review, and/or a lot of controversy, plus a peek at a page of the book to spark my interest enough to read it. I'm contrary enough that I don't usually care what "everybody" is reading; I don't have to read it just because others are.


message 13: by Nicole (last edited Mar 26, 2009 07:52AM) (new)

Nicole | 1752 comments Oh, trust me, I read plenty of fluff.
I think Billy Connolly is wonderful! :)


message 14: by Reggia (new)

Reggia | 2285 comments I love a book that makes me laugh, not to mention how much I need one right now. I will have to look into this Stephanie Plum series. Can't wait...


message 15: by [deleted user] (new)

Is The Story of Edgar Sawtelle a bestseller?


message 16: by [deleted user] (new)

I am still recovering from our trip to the Grand Canyon which caused my autoimmune disorder to flare up. Glad you are painting. I just met another artist here also named Alice. You can almost see my picture at the canyon here but its too tiny!

Well, the book Edgar Sawtelle isn't an easy read IMO. Its about dogs and murder but he goes on and on the way my husband claims women writers do. Prose? I don't get that at all. DUH! It is a very sad book pretty much right from the start. I really didn't expect much but since I love dogs thought I might like it. I don't even seem to care for these dogs. If it was definitely about collies or Shelties I might even feel different.


message 17: by Barbara (last edited Apr 11, 2009 11:28PM) (new)

Barbara (sema4dogz) How are you going ? Better now I hope. Just looking at your Sawtelle post re dogs - I never read anything , not matter how good with dogs or animals in it as it is a absolutr certain stone cold fact that something awful will happen to one or more of them and I jsut can't bear it . I never could - apparently as a child even Danny Kaye's Ugly Duckling song was enough to provoke floods. These days I get dreadful pictures in my head and can't get rid of them..........And I don't even feel guilty when people tell me I ought to save that kind of emotion for human cruelty.


message 18: by Barbara (last edited Apr 12, 2009 01:07AM) (new)

Barbara (sema4dogz) In any case, being wracked with compassion for animals doesn't stop you being likewise for people does it!
Thank you all
And Alice, you know that 'Im Indoors' comment about by women not getting to the point actually reflects many men's inability to see that often the detail IS the point.....
I hope you feel better soon too.


message 19: by Werner (new)

Werner | 2205 comments Barbara's point that feeling compassion for animals doesn't stop you for feeling it for people as well is exactly right. Indeed, I'd say that an ability to feel genuine compassion for suffering tends to extend itself to anybody and anything that hurts --it isn't selective.

Seeing, or reading about, animals suffering tears me up inside, too!


message 20: by Reggia (new)

Reggia | 2285 comments I have much compassion for my fellow humans as well but as the loose paraphrase says "a man is known for how he treats his beast". It is hard to witness suffering of any kind.

Thanks for the "love", Gabi. Sending mine to all of you, too.

Barbara wrote:you know that 'Im Indoors' comment about by women not getting to the point actually reflects many men's inability to see that often the detail IS the point...


Amen! thank you, Barbara. It is in not listening that one can so easily miss the point, and therefore dismiss the words. But I recognize your "many" and distinguish it from "all". ;)




message 21: by [deleted user] (new)

Gabi wrote: "I am the same with animals. Most of their problems are because of humans. I couldn't read Watership Down, but I did read The Plague Dogs, but had to force myself to finish it. Great writing, but te..."

I read Watership Down when my sister gave me the book in 1975. I was ok with it and I think I read The Plague Dogs too but I am not sure about that one. There are lots of good neverending quiz questions about Watership Downs if you watch for them. Gabi, I also cannot exercise much so I relate. I was able to do Tai Chi for awhile but right now can't even do that.




message 22: by [deleted user] (last edited Apr 12, 2009 08:06PM) (new)

Barbara wrote: "

Glad you feel better about it all. I am worn out from having too much fun today but it was sure worth it. Hope your day was good too.




message 23: by Nicole (new)

Nicole | 1752 comments Sorry to hear about your back, Gabi.

I hate it when bad things happen to animals, too. I never understood why so many people like the story "Old Yeller"...any story with a dead dog in it ruins my day.


message 24: by [deleted user] (new)

Do NOT read The Story do Edgar Sawtelle. I finished it last night and I cried. I do not want to post about it as someone may want to read it but it is sad. I guess I can say the only person I really liked was Edgar. I did not get hung up on any dog as I usually do like when I read White Fang or The Call of the Wild. Even Lad: A Dog broke my heart. Be careful what you read. I used to read all the James Herriot stories and mostly be ok with those. Did anyone else read them too?


message 25: by Reggia (last edited Apr 13, 2009 02:27PM) (new)

Reggia | 2285 comments I own the Herriot collection that begins with All Things Great and Small but haven't yet read them. We also have James Herriot's Treasury for Children: Warm and Joyful Tales which I read many times over to my children, great stories.

Thanks, Charly, for the Carl Hiaasen recommendation. :)


message 26: by Werner (new)

Werner | 2205 comments I've read all four of the original Herriot books, and thoroughly loved them! (My wife did, too!) Overall, I read more fiction than nonfiction for pleasure; but these books are as entertaining as any novel.


message 27: by [deleted user] (new)

Reggia wrote: "I own the Herriot collection that begins with [b:All Things Great and Small|37818|James Herriot All Creatures Great and Small/All Things Bright and Beautiful/All Things Wise and Wonderful/the Lord..."

I did own them all too but guessing I gave some away. I also bought his book, was it Yorkshire? Its really a book of photos which are very beautiful. After I read Winston Graham's Poldark books I also bought his book of photographs of Cornwall. I forget what the exact titles of these books are now.
Was The Christmas Kitten in one of these? I remember reading the story mainly in a Readers Digest Christmas Edition and it was so sad about a mother cat who comes into the house just to have her one little Christmas kitten before she dies. It is heartbreaking story but the kitten was wonderful. Hmmm, now wondering if there are any neverending quiz questions from James Herriot? Got to add some, LOL!




message 28: by Nicole (new)

Nicole | 1752 comments Probably not something most folks in this group would be interested in reading, but I'm currently reading Neil Gaiman's The Graveyard Book. It's sold like hotcakes and is collecting various awards.


message 29: by Werner (new)

Werner | 2205 comments I've got that one on my to-read shelf, actually! Don't know when I'll get around to it, though. :-)


message 30: by Nicole (new)

Nicole | 1752 comments When you get around to it, I hope you enjoy it. But I know what you mean about the to-read shelf. So little time, so many books! ;)


message 31: by [deleted user] (new)

Callista wrote: "Probably not something most folks in this group would be interested in reading, but I'm currently reading Neil Gaiman's The Graveyard Book. It's sold like hotcakes and is collecting various awards. "

I hope to read that one too but didn't like American Gods and unable to finish Neverwhere. I love Stardust and got the DVD for Christmas about 2 years ago. I had no idea Neil Gaiman wrote the book until joining goodreads!!! Amazing how Hollywood ignores the author of a book. My favorite is for children and is M is for Magic. Some really good short stories in there.


message 32: by [deleted user] (new)

I mean they are EXCELLENT!


message 33: by Nicole (new)

Nicole | 1752 comments I really liked Neverwhere. But I read only a few pages of American Gods and didn't want to continue. Gaiman's fiction runs the gamut. If you didn't care for American Gods, I recommend you stay away from Smoke and Mirrors. If you haven't read his short story "Chivalry," though, seek it out in some other form or collection; I think you'd like the story. I enjoyed Stardust, as well, and also own the movie.
I finished The Graveyard Book, and it was lovely.


message 34: by Nicole (last edited Jul 22, 2009 10:07AM) (new)

Nicole | 1752 comments Now I'm reading New Moon (The Twilight Saga #2)...and I'm a bit disturbed by Bella's self-destructive behaviour.


message 35: by Nicole (new)

Nicole | 1752 comments ...Now I'm more than a bit disturbed. Both Bella and Edward are suicidal. If I had a child reading it, we would have to sit down and have a serious talk.


message 36: by Werner (new)

Werner | 2205 comments Callista, I haven't read New Moon yet; but my understanding is that it's actually #2 of the Twilight series, not #1 as it's cited in your message 42 above. The series opener is Twilight.

Despite my negative comments above about best seller lists, some of the things I read happen to be on them --though I don't pick them for that reason. :-) I'm reading Twilight right now, and liking it a lot!


message 37: by Nicole (new)

Nicole | 1752 comments Oops--I hit 1 instead of 2. I've now edited that, with the proper series name. I read the books in the correct order, every bloody (pun intended) one of them, plus the 'unauthorized' incomplete version of Twilight-from-Edward's-POV, Midnight Sun. I liked the first book the most. But I definitely have a love-hate relationship with the series.


message 38: by Vicky (new)

Vicky | 97 comments I'm into Asian fantasy books ,so the third volume of the line of books came out in March .But I can't get my hands on it because it sold out of stock and out of the publisher stock too .I've gone on line for used ones and the bidding prices are way out pocket for me . But I do have a copy of the final Harry Potter . Twilight is also a good one.They all have excellent storylines .


message 39: by [deleted user] (last edited Jun 16, 2010 09:01PM) (new)

Werner wrote: "Callista, I haven't read New Moon yet; but my understanding is that it's actually #2 of the Twilight series, not #1 as it's cited in your message 42 above. The series opener is Twilight.

Yes, you are right Werner as New Moon is number 2. I have read the first 3 5 times and the last one 4 times. They go:
!. Twilight
2. New Moon
3. Eclipse
4. Breaking Dawn and now The Short Second LIfe of Bree Tanner is out which about a little vampire in Breaking Dawn. I bought it as soon as I saw it and there are already about 7 questions on the neverending quiz about this book.
I also own both DVD's and both CD's.
Alice who is obsessed with Twilight (makes me feel better)

The Short Second Life of Bree Tanner: An Eclipse Novella



message 40: by [deleted user] (new)

Callista wrote: "...Now I'm more than a bit disturbed. Both Bella and Edward are suicidal. If I had a child reading it, we would have to sit down and have a serious talk."

Bells isn't really suicidal but she just wants to hear his voice. If you think that is rough wait til you read number 4. Course poor Edward is sick but what vampire wouldn't be?


message 41: by [deleted user] (new)

Ah, answered my own question as Werner's vampire Ana is NOT sick. She is very sweet and sane.Lifeblood


message 42: by Werner (new)

Werner | 2205 comments Thanks, Alice! (One local radio talk show host who read Lifeblood and interviewed me, the year it was first published, said, "She's the nicest vampire you'll ever meet; you could have her babysit your kids!")


message 43: by [deleted user] (new)

Werner wrote: "Thanks, Alice! (One local radio talk show host who read Lifeblood and interviewed me, the year it was first published, said, "She's the nicest vampire you'll ever meet; you could have her babysit ..."

Yes, its true! Ana is very nice and too kind.


message 44: by Erin E (new)

Erin E (elizamc) Werner wrote: "Truth to tell, I honestly don't pay much attention to the bestseller lists (although one of my cousins does). In my opinion, a book's presence on those lists is only a reflection of the amount of m..."

Well SAID Werner!! I agree, though there are some that are truly worth the time, others are worth being kindling for my campfires (in my opinion, not obviously others) The Historian being on of those books, then again I think there are some that I have read and loved... for example I am currently reading The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo and it is proving to be worth my time - and I was worried the hype about this book was purly because it was published post-humously.


message 45: by Erin E (new)

Erin E (elizamc) I enjoyed the Twilight Series, as far as Young Adult novels go this is there less disturbing of what is out there these days. I have SERIOUS misgivings about the "house of night" series... That is a series that not only is too graphic and gratuitous it should NOT be read by anyone younger than 18! YIKES!

And Callista I think there have been some groups of thought who have drawn links between themes and tennets in the Twilight series to addictions and co-dependencies... Intriguing thought..?


message 46: by [deleted user] (new)

Bestseller lists are made up of sales to book stores before anyone gets to read them, so take it with a grain of salt.


message 47: by Nicole (last edited Mar 01, 2011 10:11AM) (new)

Nicole | 1752 comments Erin, I can see how people could use Twilight to discuss addiction and co-dependence. Bella is addicted to Edward. Edward even compares blood to heroin when explaining his attraction to the smell of Bella's blood.
And I agree about "House of Night"--ugh.


message 48: by Nicole (new)

Nicole | 1752 comments I have the next Dresden Files book on my to-read list and am eagerly (and anxiously) awaiting its release in July. It amazes me a bit that the series has become NYT bestseller material, but it's great for the author.


message 49: by [deleted user] (new)

Finished Moon Music and still reading Sherlock Holmes stories and Moby Dick. Want to get Whoopi Goldberg's book.


message 50: by [deleted user] (new)

Also reading James Lee Burke's Crusader Cross.


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