The Diving Bell and the Butterfly The Diving Bell and the Butterfly discussion


135 views
The Diving Bell and the Butterfly

Comments Showing 1-10 of 10 (10 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Laura (last edited Aug 25, 2016 11:24AM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Laura This is non fiction. Although the author is trapped in his body after a paralyzing stroke, this book was not depressing but interesting and somewhat uplifting.


message 2: by Beth (last edited Aug 25, 2016 01:53PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Beth I just couldn't get past his overall fate.


message 3: by Ketija (last edited Feb 04, 2008 07:41PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Ketija
I think this is a genius piece of literary art.



message 4: by EJ (new) - rated it 5 stars

EJ Laura
That is what is so brilliant about this book is that he didnt drone on and on about his fate or his life lost. He acknowledged his grief and moved on and with his book celebrated his life


message 5: by Jo (new) - rated it 4 stars

Jo This book does not simply say, "Hey things are great now that I have come to terms with my inability". In these pages Jean-Dominique Bauby describes the complexity of his stationary physical life and his mental life; the positive and the negative. He deals with anger, frustration, helplessness, and futility throughout the book. He shares both the tearing down of his world and how he recreates it and then learns to deal with his new reality. He shows those doorways that we can all walk through when dealing with negative things in our lives; hope, love, creativity, memory, imagination ... and how these things can also be a torture; for him, a sometimes bittersweet joy and an anchor to a "life" lost. Personally, his words pushed a reset button in my heart and my mind.


Susan Has anyone read this in french and english? how much is lost in translation? or was this only written in english?


Megan This book changed my life. It opened my eyes to the many tiny details that I take for granted on a regular basis. It inspired me to reach into myself and become in better touch with my imagination. His thoughts were so vivid and refined, because he put all that he had into these words. Every sentence is like a beautiful melody of a song. The book in it's entirety is a symphony of the human spirit and of life through an enlightened perception.


message 8: by Cac (new) - rated it 5 stars

Cac Did anyone understand what "The Message" chapter was about? It was so short and what was the significance of him waiting for a message on that typewriter with a blank piece of pink paper in the roll?


message 9: by Red (new) - rated it 5 stars

Red Heaven EJ wrote: "Laura
That is what is so brilliant about this book is that he didnt drone on and on about his fate or his life lost. He acknowledged his grief and moved on and with his book celebrated his life"


Thank you. I am surprised at some of the negative reviews. Self-centered? Aren't most of us? Yet when he had everything taken away, he realized how much he took for granted, and how much he missed simple pleasures - the taste of food - that he would never have again.

When I read it earlier today, he did not come across as self-centered or wallowing in self-pity. What did come through is the overwhelming frustration of his predicament, being totally reliant on others for almost everything. And still a humor and a strength shone through his words.

I was with him on every page, reliving some of the happier - and not so happy - memories of his life. I thought this book was excellent.


message 10: by Red (new) - rated it 5 stars

Red Heaven Cac wrote: "Did anyone understand what "The Message" chapter was about? It was so short and what was the significance of him waiting for a message on that typewriter with a blank piece of pink paper in the roll?"

It can be looked at as waiting for a recovery - which medically, I don't think is possible.


back to top