Vaginal Fantasy Book Club discussion

Innocent Darkness (The Aether Chronicles, #1)
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Book Discussion & Recommendation > Possible book idea

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message 1: by Cherish (new)

Cherish (lady_cherish) | 94 comments I tripped across this book, while on-line, somewhere. Wondering if anyone's read this series, as it appears to fit our genre and whether it's worth a consideration for us. It's called 'Innocent Darkness: The Aether Chronicles' and it's authored by Suzanne Lazear.


message 2: by Kamil (new) - added it

Kamil | 938 comments seems interesting!!!!


message 3: by Cherish (new)

Cherish (lady_cherish) | 94 comments My main concern is whether this is geared to youth or more adult fiction, hence my wondering as to whether anyone else has read it.


message 4: by willaful (new)

willaful Seems to be YA.


message 5: by Cherish (new)

Cherish (lady_cherish) | 94 comments Too bad, A little more mature and it could be an intriguing story.


message 6: by Kamil (new) - added it

Kamil | 938 comments Cherish wrote: "Too bad, A little more mature and it could be an intriguing story."

don't be too judgy of YA books


message 7: by Erin L (new)

Erin L (wellreadmoose) I think there has been some great YA fantasy put out lately.

Also some sheer crap so I've been very hesitant to pick up new stuff.


message 8: by Cherish (new)

Cherish (lady_cherish) | 94 comments Not "judgy", no, just turning a very youthful 50, in two days, and I prefer to have characters I can relate to, at least on some level, in my fictional world. 16 is just a little too far a stretch for that. 26 I can handle ;)


message 9: by Amber Dawn (new)

Amber Dawn (ginger_bug) | 147 comments I really like a lot of YA stuff. I'll probably give this a look. I have noticed recently that YA fantasy romance books tend to stay further away from the Alpha Male trope, which pleases me. Of course there's generally less actually smutty parts too.


message 10: by Gotobedmouse (new)

Gotobedmouse | 73 comments I would love to have a month of steampunk books. I have always wanted to read them and this would be a good excuse. I am loving the historical romance theme this month.


message 11: by Amber Dawn (new)

Amber Dawn (ginger_bug) | 147 comments Gotobedmouse wrote: "I would love to have a month of steampunk books. I have always wanted to read them and this would be a good excuse. I am loving the historical romance theme this month."

There was - Iron Duke and Soulless... There's enough in the genre I'm sure to warrant an eventual revisit though


message 12: by Felicia, Grand Duchess (new)

Felicia (feliciaday) | 740 comments Mod
I have a really hard time relating with teen protagonists. I guess in my mind, if they're in love with someone at that age, they'll probably break up in a few years to move onto their REAL mate, so it seems less to invest in? Also sexy-scenes are blah for age haha.


message 13: by Maribeth (new)

Maribeth | 23 comments Felicia wrote: "I have a really hard time relating with teen protagonists. I guess in my mind, if they're in love with someone at that age, they'll probably break up in a few years to move onto their REAL mate, s..."
did you read John Green's 'Fault in our Stars'? He does YA brilliantly....

Of course in 'Hunger Games' I felt that Katniss' lack of interest in her two suiters made perfect sense because of both her youth AND the fact that her life was at stake (who has time to worry about boys?!?!? LOL)

So I've read a lot of YA I really could relate to and care about recently.


message 14: by Cherish (new)

Cherish (lady_cherish) | 94 comments Felicia wrote: "I have a really hard time relating with teen protagonists. I guess in my mind, if they're in love with someone at that age, they'll probably break up in a few years to move onto their REAL mate, s..."

Yes, this was my point. I'm looking for some depth and to be able to fall into the character, when I read. The characters have to have some plausibility in my world, even if in fantasy.


message 15: by Amber Dawn (new)

Amber Dawn (ginger_bug) | 147 comments Felicia wrote: "I have a really hard time relating with teen protagonists. I guess in my mind, if they're in love with someone at that age, they'll probably break up in a few years to move onto their REAL mate, s..."

To me, the whole "I'm so consumingly in love with this person they are THE ONE blah blah blah" makes sooo much more sense in teenagers, because it's normal to have those kind of emotional reactions at that age.. when adult characters express that kind of thing, it's a little off putting to me.


message 16: by Erin (new)

Erin | 14 comments Felicia wrote: "I have a really hard time relating with teen protagonists. I guess in my mind, if they're in love with someone at that age, they'll probably break up in a few years to move onto their REAL mate, s..."

I do roll my eyes a lot when I read YA stuff lol.


message 17: by Amber (new)

Amber (kiantewench) Felicia wrote: "I have a really hard time relating with teen protagonists. I guess in my mind, if they're in love with someone at that age, they'll probably break up in a few years to move onto their REAL mate, s..."

And all too often, YA fiction does not depict anything close to a healthy relationship, which for me, is a total turn off. When I was a teen, I was reading Adult Romance books. They made far more sense to me and more of what I wanted. I think a lot of teens these days are lacking in the thoughts of having something real and good for them. Its all "head-staple-forehead."


message 18: by Brittany (new)

Brittany H. (amauzume) | 2 comments Amber wrote: "Felicia wrote: "I have a really hard time relating with teen protagonists. I guess in my mind, if they're in love with someone at that age, they'll probably break up in a few years to move onto th..."

I totally feel you. The only time I ever really felt there was healthy relationships that last in YA was in Harry Potter.


message 19: by Keidy (new)

Keidy | 313 comments I totally feel you. The only time I ever really felt there was healthy relationships that last in YA was in Harry Potter.

Isn't Harry Potter under the category of "Independent Readers"? At least that's why I thought it was more bearable relationship wise.


message 20: by Brittany (last edited Jul 20, 2012 11:36PM) (new)

Brittany H. (amauzume) | 2 comments Keidy wrote: "I totally feel you. The only time I ever really felt there was healthy relationships that last in YA was in Harry Potter.

Isn't Harry Potter under the category of "Independent Readers"? At least t..."


Ba-da-dump!

But, seriously, you have a point. Awesome female protagonists and passes both the Bechdel test and the reverse Bechdel test.


message 21: by Keidy (new)

Keidy | 313 comments Brittany wrote: "Ba-da-dump!"

Sorry. Someone was going to say it. I just got there first. ^_^;


message 22: by Amber Dawn (new)

Amber Dawn (ginger_bug) | 147 comments Amber wrote: "Felicia wrote: "I have a really hard time relating with teen protagonists. I guess in my mind, if they're in love with someone at that age, they'll probably break up in a few years to move onto th..."

though I would not contradict you that unhealthy relationships are widespread in YA fiction, I wouldn't consider it a particular flaw of YA fiction itself or say that adult fiction is generally better. I think that unhealthy relationships are prevalent in fiction for teens and adults because they feed into tropes that we have about what relationships should be like.. and because in a way they make better stories, if the relationship = the major plot of the story. Of course, I can enjoy something like Wuthering Heights without thinking that the characters are behaving well or someone to fantasize over or emulate.. that may not be true of everyone. That being said,I think there are a lot of YA authors who handle relationships well.. not necessarily portraying only healthy relationships but with characters making reasoned moral choices about their relationships.. such as Tamora Pierce, Pearl North, Rachel Caine's Morganville, Holly Black's Curse Workers (in which, almost everyone's relationships romantic and not are pretty messed up, but I think it's well handled). One thing I enjoy about more modern YA fiction is that frequently the romance will evolve out of a sometimes lengthy friendship which is more realistic to my experience and not portrayed as often in books for adults that I've read.


message 23: by Liz (new) - rated it 3 stars

Liz (elizziebooks) | 1 comments I read this book for review on Netgalley and it's not too pleasing (at least not to me). There's too much teasing of a sexy times scene, but nothing really happens. There's this whole "We can't because our world is falling apart" speech from the boy she's in love with. I'm sure that's a valid excuse, but not when you've already gone so far. And the whole steam punk feel is gone after about a chapter. *shrugs*


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