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Archives > Short Story Contest (June 8th-June 15th)

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message 1: by Isaac (new)

Isaac | 8014 comments Emily is taking control again!

Okay guys, I expect some entries. Don't be SLACKERS this week because SLACKERS are no fun and I don't want you guys to be SLACKERS because then you won't be fun just like SLACKERS are.

*clears throat*

This week's topic is a Ferris wheel.

Knock yourself out.

But not literally.

Because I need stories. Not SLACKERS.

Oh, and make sure they aren't over 2,000 words.

That is all.

You may begin!


message 2: by Colby (new)

Colby (colbz) | 3211 comments I ***THINK*** I have an idea.


message 3: by Isaac (new)

Isaac | 8014 comments YOU SHOULD TAKE THAT IDEA AND MAKE IT INTO A THING.


message 4: by sucre'd fiend (new)

sucre'd fiend (sucredfiend) | 79 comments I got something, not positive though


message 5: by Autumn (new)

Autumn (flwurautumn) | 4987 comments I don't have an idea. I shall attempt to have one.


message 6: by [deleted user] (new)

http://www.goodreads.com/story/show/3...
Here's my entry. The only thing is that I'm not positive how many words are in it, but I felt giving it a shot and posting it anyway. Boo ya.
Oh, and you didn't make it clear if the story had to be on a ferris wheel, or just mention one. I only mentioned it.


message 7: by Colby (new)

Colby (colbz) | 3211 comments Your story just has to use the prompt in some way.


Iviana (The Sign Painter) Mʘ‿ʘP (thesignpainter) Oh my. I want to make a Pokemon fanfic but it's not allowed.


message 9: by Dee (new)

Dee | 22 comments (Here goes nothing!):


I thought back to the memory of my last night with him. I could almost smell the sticky caramel apples and popcorn. I could feel the warm August breeze lift wisps of my hair away from my head and out into the wind. I remembered everything exactly as it happened. I knew I wouldn't forget.

"Sherri, let's ride the Ferris wheel!" Ty tugged my hand gently towards the towering circle. He had always been adventurous and spunky. I was nervous. I had never been one to enjoy heights, but Ty made me feel fearless. He was the best little brother a girl could ask for.

I followed him diligently up to the line where we waited and watched everyone. A pregnant woman ate a dripping snow cone while her husband blabbed on his phone. A screaming toddler demanded candy. An old man sat on a bench, a lonely soul surrounded by a carnival of happiness.

When it was our turn to get on the ride, we jumped into the carts that dangled from the wheel. I secured the bar and made Ty promise not to rock the cart.

The wheel kept advancing towards the sky, and I tried not to look below me. I kept my eyes on the bright stars in the deep night sky. Ty wouldn't stop talking.

"But when we get home then maybe we can catch lightning bugs!" He smiled and his eyes twinkled. I hadn't seen him that lively in months.

"Ty, you know how these things work. You need to get back to the hospital right after we leave the carnival. You know you need to get better." I hated reminding him of his illness. I hated how his eyes dimmed immediately and he scowled. The only thing worse than having a brother with cancer was being the brother with cancer.

I will always remember the way his eyes lost their glow on the Ferris wheel. That was the first time I truly realized that he was gone.


message 10: by Isaac (new)

Isaac | 8014 comments YES MORE ENTRIES!


message 11: by Colby (new)

Colby (colbz) | 3211 comments My Mother's Will

My mother’s been locked in her bedroom since 2004, when I was seventeen and my father was killed in a tremendous Ferris wheel accident. He was walking through the crowded parking lot of a grocery store in our tiny town. The parking lot of the place had never seen so many cars, but a little traveling carnival had come through town and asked to set up at the far end of the lot. As he loaded groceries into the trunk of the little car, oblivious to the screaming, the Ferris wheel became detached, its axle pulling itself from the two giant arms on the sides of the wheel. The damn thing rolled and rolled, the bottoms of each of the passenger cars bumping on the ground, until it came to a rest against the building, leaving my father flattened in its path. The following day, the Tribune quoted a local who had been walking into the store, saying, “That thing was a spectacle, a damn spectacle, I tell you.” Nobody else had been killed or hurt, even the passengers, who had, by some miracle, been kept away from the ground.
The only way my mom kept me fed and housed those few years I lived with her after that was from all the money we made in the lawsuit. My sister was already in her twenties and didn’t live with us, so I didn’t go to college right away, of course, because I was not a bad son. For three years after I graduated, until the year 2008, I stayed in the house and kept the rooms clean – which was simple, as nobody came and my mother stayed in her room – and made my mother meals. “You’re a good son,” was about the extent of our conversations those years. But at some point, you simply cannot play the role of the good son anymore. At some point, I just had to rip off the Band-Aid and tell my mother that I was ready to go, and it broke her heart, but it was better for both of us in the long run.
Except now I’m not so sure.
My sister and I are in my mother’s house, in the house where I stayed for those dreadful years, sitting side by side on the torn couch. Neither of us knows what to say.
When one of us does speak, it is not to make the other feel better or to show any new insight on the situation. It is a simple statement, and that is all.
“We’re orphans now,” I say.
“Don’t say that word,” she mutters. “Orphans. I don’t like it. We aren’t Little Orphan Annie or anything.”
“It’s true, though,” I reply. “We are. Orphans.”
“I know.”
And I don’t know why in hell I bring it up, but I do. “I’m just surprised you came home for this funeral.”
“Eric, shut up.”
“It was our father’s funeral, Bree, and you weren’t there.”
“You know I would have lost my job if I would have missed that meeting. You know that.”
“Bree, he was our dad.”
She gets really quiet now.
“I know. I know. And I should have gone. I really should have.”

At some point, after a lapse in the conversation, one of us gets down to the heart of the matter, to what we met here for.
My mother’s will.
“A lawyer’s supposed to be here to oversee this,” says Bree.
About that time, there’s a hard, three-beat knock at the door. I walk to the door and let a tall, lean man in.
“You the lawyer?” Bree asks.
“Yes, ma’am, I am,” the young man says.
“Good,” I say. “Then let’s get down to business.”
A sheet of paper sits between us on the table. It is folded up into four squares, so that nobody can read what it says without reaching out and taking it, but nobody wants to be the one to do that.
What is on that paper could be pivotal, could make us hate each other. Siblings are torn apart all the time in fighting over their parent’s will, over finding out who was mom’s favorite.
So the lawyer picks up the paper from the table and unfolds it. He takes a moment to read it. Then he folds it again and returns it to the table.
Bree and I both reach for the paper.
“Okay,” I say. “Together. On three.”
“One,” she says.
“Two,” I say.
“Three,” we say together.
We unfold the paper and read the print. Bree and I both nod before returning it, folded, to the table.


message 12: by Isaac (new)

Isaac | 8014 comments GOOD COLBY FOR ENTERING A STORY.


message 13: by Colby (new)

Colby (colbz) | 3211 comments YES GO ME.


message 14: by Anastasia (new)

Anastasia (booksteainsanity) | 955 comments Dee wrote: "(Here goes nothing!):


I thought back to the memory of my last night with him. I could almost smell the sticky caramel apples and popcorn. I could feel the warm August breeze lift wisps of my hair..."


Oh, wow. That last sentence was so powerful. :'(


message 15: by Anastasia (new)

Anastasia (booksteainsanity) | 955 comments I SHALL ENTER.


message 16: by Anastasia (new)

Anastasia (booksteainsanity) | 955 comments Here is my entry. It is as cheesy as Stinking Bishop!

Jacob hands the tickets to the man standing beside the Ferris wheel entrance. The man looks down at the tickets, then motions us through to one of the carts.

I beam at Jacob, and he squeezes my hand anxiously as we climb into the cart.

The only thing I’m gripping harder than the safety bar is Jacob’s hand. Even though I’m not afraid of heights, I hate that feeling that convinces me that I will fall eventually, no matter how protected I may be.

I turn my head to glance at the bay, which is sparkling in the setting sun. The light dances off of the water as though it is waving to me, the sojourner of the air. Though Jacob will probably think I’m crazy, I wave back to the water.

The Ferris wheel stops. I gasp; we are so high up. Taking in my surroundings, I sit very still while the cart rocks back and forth gently in the wind.

When I turn back to my boyfriend, he is smiling sweetly. I take in his black, buzz-cut hair and his soft blue eyes that sparkle as much as the bay does.

“What?” I ask softly. This moment is so fragile, so delicate, that I do not have the strength to break it.

“I just enjoy being with you so much, Tara,” Jacob answers. “Today has been such a fun day.”

I nod as I recall all of the rides we went on today, how he bought a large bag of cotton candy that we both shared. It has, indeed, been a wonderful day.

“There’s nothing that could make it better,” I whisper, staring back out at the sunset again. Today’s events have been so carefully threaded together that I wouldn’t want to change anything.

“Actually, there is,” Jacob tells me, cupping my face in his hands and pulling me closer.

I think I know what he wants. And I realize that we both share the same desire.

Jacob has his arms around me, and I’m falling, but I know he’ll catch me. It is just Jacob and me and the swaying Ferris wheel cart and our kiss.

Suddenly, I am not so scared of being this far up. Heights don’t matter anymore, because I am already at the top of the world.


message 17: by Dee (new)

Dee | 22 comments Anastasia wrote: "Dee wrote: "(Here goes nothing!):


THANK YOU C:



message 18: by Autumn (new)

Autumn (flwurautumn) | 4987 comments Emily, do you care about word limit?


message 19: by Colby (new)

Colby (colbz) | 3211 comments Emily [Just call me Mrs. Rogers] wrote: "Oh, and make sure they aren't over 2,000 words."

Ahem.


message 20: by Autumn (new)

Autumn (flwurautumn) | 4987 comments SHH READING INSTRUCTIONS IS FOR THE INTELLIGENT.


message 21: by Anastasia (new)

Anastasia (booksteainsanity) | 955 comments Dee wrote: "Anastasia wrote: "Dee wrote: "(Here goes nothing!):


THANK YOU C:"


You're welcome. :)


message 22: by Autumn (new)

Autumn (flwurautumn) | 4987 comments What the Hell Is a Carabiner?

Charlotte was bored. When she announced this to her roommates, they groaned. Bad things tended to happen when Charlotte was bored—bad things meaning dangerous, life-threatening things whose thrilling adrenaline rushes were occasionally not worth the trouble.

“What do you have in mind?” Ella asked, slowly looking up from the book she was reading. Ella too loved adventures, but she preferred anything life-threatening on the page, thank you very much. Their other roommate, Mari, shot Ella a look out the corner of her eye. She hadn’t torn her gaze away from the television, hoping that if she pretended Charlotte hadn’t said anything, Charlotte would play along.

“It’s been awhile since we went to amusement park,” said Charlotte with a grin. Ella and Mari shared a reproachful look. It sounded innocent, but they both knew nothing Charlotte ever had in mind was innocent.

Ella and Mari whispered over the controls in the front of the car while Charlotte loaded a backpack into the trunk. When Mari had asked what was in it, Charlotte had replied, “Supplies, of course.”

“All set!” Charlotte said brightly, climbing into the backseat. “Drive on!” With one last look back, Ella shifted into drive, hoping this was one of Charlotte’s safer ideas. Something about the way her friend hummed under her breath told Ella it wasn’t, though. The entire drive, Mari stared wordlessly out the passenger window, watching inch by inch as the sun sunk below the horizon.

The trio managed to scrape together enough money between the three of them to afford the admission fees. Once inside the park, Mari and Ella began to relax at the easy music and laughter around them. It was like a reminder that people went to the amusement park every day, and they managed to survive, so there was a chance Ella and Mari could too. They grinned at Charlotte, allowing them to lead her where the map took her.

As they walked, Charlotte snapped picture after picture of the bright nighttime amusement park landscape. True, she was a photographer, but it wasn’t like Charlotte to be so enraptured by such ordinary scenes.

“Charlotte,” Ella finally asked, happily devouring a corn dog after their fourth roller coaster. “Is what we’re doing tonight safe?”

Charlotte gave her a look as if there was no reason to ask such a question. “Of course what we’re doing tonight is safe.”

Mari and Ella could give looks too. However, the one they shared read more of uneasiness at Charlotte’s strange emphasis.

Mari pointed out another roller coaster, but Ella shook her head. “I just ate four corn dogs!”

“Well, I guess you should’ve controlled your monster appetite,” Mari snapped, annoyed that she wasn’t getting her way as she was accustomed to.

“Cut it out, you two,” Charlotte intervened, but the smile on her face said she was amused by the trivial predicament because there was something bigger at hand. “Why don’t we try something safe before the roller coaster? There’s not much of a line at the Ferris wheel.”

“Okay,” Mari and Ella agreed.

Before they slipped into the queue, Charlotte pulled something out of her backpack. She approached a woman sitting on a bench with a tired sort of look about her. Mari and Ella exchanged yet another glance, but each of them was just as clueless as the other. Ella thought it looked almost like a disposable camera, but she couldn’t think of a reason Charlotte would be giving one to the woman. Then again, she couldn’t think of a reason Charlotte would be giving anything at all to the woman.

Charlotte seemed giddier and giddier the higher the wheel took them. It was a slow process; they’d been the first to board, so the man behind the controls had to turn the wheel slowly to board the rest of the passengers. When they began their descent, Charlotte unzipped her backpack but didn’t remove or replace anything.

“Char?” Mari asked, but Charlotte only smiled secretively.

Charlotte waved at the man behind the machine as they crept lazily past him, but once they were out of range, she pulled a bungee cord from her bag.

“Oh, God, Charlotte, no!” Mari shrieked, and Ella stared frozenly at the cord like it was a snake.

“Don’t worry,” Charlotte tsked at the pair. “I’ve got all sorts of safety equipment.”

“No!” Mari repeated as Charlotte quickly rustled through the bag. “Just no!”

“Where the hell is it?” Charlotte said, mostly to herself.

“See, something’s missing!” cried Mari.

“Just the carabiner,” Charlotte assured her with a smile.

“What the hell is a carabiner?” Mari nearly screamed. She was a bit hysterical, it seemed, but Charlotte couldn’t imagine why.

Ella stared at Charlotte like she was an asylum patient. She answered Mari because she was a climber herself. “Only the piece that attaches your harness to the rope. But, as Char said, just the carabiner.”

“Would you two...” Charlotte muttered, but her sentence cut off because she was distracted with her bag. They were nearly at the top, and she couldn’t risk letting Mari and Ella pass by the control man while she was in the cart. They would most definitely let him in on her fun. She finally gave up; it looked like she’d have to climb without restraint. It was okay, she liked it better this way.

“Would you‽” yelled Mari. “Look at the ground and tell me that this is idea is a good one!”

“It’s good fun,” Charlotte replied, making sure her camera was still hanging around her neck. They were one quarter of the way now, and it was time she start the climb. “Here goes nothing!”

She made her way out the back of the cart, clinging to the metal bars. Any time she felt one of her friends try to grab at her feet, she kicked wildly so they couldn’t possibly get a hold. The adrenaline began racing hot through her blood, and she commanded herself not to look down. She was dreadfully afraid of heights.

“Help! Help!” Ella was screaming at the top of her lungs. Mari joined her quickly, and Charlotte dared a glance over her shoulder to see them waving wildly at the attendant. What she didn’t dare do was check for his reaction. All she could do at this point was continue climbing.

Charlotte scaled the rungs steadily. She’d done a fair amount of climbing in her time, and she matched her hands and feet to the bars with practice. Still, she found her breath came heavy and her heart was beating wildly.

“This is just like any other climb,” she told herself. “This is just like any other climb.”

She saw a lights flashing below her, and Charlotte looked down without thinking. She cringed at how small the people were on the ground, clinging tighter to the rods with white knuckles. A voice crackled through a megaphone, but Charlotte couldn’t hear over the rush of blood in her head.

She finally tore her gaze from down to up, and all the noise from below became nothing more than a tinny buzz in the back of her mind. Had she been breathing, Charlotte was sure the breath would have been knocked out of her. There were stretches and stretches of dark looming ahead of her lined only with the dim highway lights, but then slowly little pinpricks began joining up the highways, snaking along until they met the city. The sky was scraped by so many shining buildings, and even the cars seemed magic as they inched along, crossing as far as she could see. It was like stars had fallen from the sky to light up the world; Charlotte knew fallen stars were supposed to be tragic, but she couldn’t help but think it was beautiful.

So taken aback by the beautiful night, Charlotte didn’t think twice before releasing both hands to close around her camera. Unfortunately, her feet weren’t doing much to hold her to the wheel, and suddenly she was falling just like those stars.


message 23: by Isaac (new)

Isaac | 8014 comments YES I KNEW MY PEP TALK (ahem demeaning, really) WOULD MAKE Y'ALL ENTER.


message 24: by Colby (new)

Colby (colbz) | 3211 comments Lots of people are writing this time!


message 25: by Anastasia (new)

Anastasia (booksteainsanity) | 955 comments Colby wrote: "Lots of people are writing this time!"

Yep!

Autumn [move the needle to a more forgiving song] wrote: "What the Hell Is a Carabiner?

Charlotte was bored. When she announced this to her roommates, they groaned. Bad things tended to happen when Charlotte was bored—bad things meaning dangerous, life-..."


That was pretty funny.


message 26: by Colby (new)

Colby (colbz) | 3211 comments ~Yue~ [Starless Nights Will Cover Day] wrote: "Autumn [move the needle to a more forgiving song] wrote: "What the Hell Is a Carabiner?

Charlotte was bored. When she announced this to her roommates, they groaned. Bad things tended to happen wh..."



message 27: by Autumn (new)

Autumn (flwurautumn) | 4987 comments Dee wrote: "(Here goes nothing!):


I thought back to the memory of my last night with him. I could almost smell the sticky caramel apples and popcorn. I could feel the warm August breeze lift wisps of my hair..."


Oh my gosh crying. Well not really but that's no fault of yours I'm bad at crying. But the last sentence was just asdfghjkl; ... I'm sorry I can't we're coherent reviews. Basically I liked it :D


message 28: by Autumn (new)

Autumn (flwurautumn) | 4987 comments Colby wrote: "My Mother's Will

My mother’s been locked in her bedroom since 2004, when I was seventeen and my father was killed in a tremendous Ferris wheel accident. He was walking through the crowded parking ..."


Oh the father was killed by a Ferris wheel I never would have predicted that.
BUT DOLBY HOLH BANANA FISH THIS WAS GREAT. The story was original and I love the cliffhanger-esque ending.


message 29: by Autumn (new)

Autumn (flwurautumn) | 4987 comments Anastasia wrote: "Here is my entry. It is as cheesy as Stinking Bishop!

Jacob hands the tickets to the man standing beside the Ferris wheel entrance. The man looks down at the tickets, then motions us throug..."


Oh my gosh this is beyond cute. I enjoy cheese dearly. I will now ship the couple for the rest of forever.


message 30: by Autumn (new)

Autumn (flwurautumn) | 4987 comments Colby wrote: "~Yue~ [Starless Nights Will Cover Day] wrote: "Autumn [move the needle to a more forgiving song] wrote: "What the Hell Is a Carabiner?

Charlotte was bored. When she announced this to her roommate..."


I think this is a good reaction, yes? Thanks for reading it, guys :)


message 31: by Autumn (new)

Autumn (flwurautumn) | 4987 comments Anastasia wrote: "Colby wrote: "Lots of people are writing this time!"

Yep!

Autumn [move the needle to a more forgiving song] wrote: "What the Hell Is a Carabiner?

Charlotte was bored. When she announced this to..."


Ha I wasn't going for funny, but I'm glad it entertained you. Thanks for reading it :)


message 32: by Anastasia (new)

Anastasia (booksteainsanity) | 955 comments Autumn [move the needle to a more forgiving song] wrote: "Anastasia wrote: "Colby wrote: "Lots of people are writing this time!"

Yep!

Autumn [move the needle to a more forgiving song] wrote: "What the Hell Is a Carabiner?

Charlotte was bored. When she..."


You're welcome. :)


message 33: by Anastasia (new)

Anastasia (booksteainsanity) | 955 comments ~Yue~ [Starless Nights Will Cover Day] wrote: "Oh corny.c:


“Oh come on,” Lucy begged as she intertwined her translucent, skinny fingers with mine in attempt to drag my stubborn body from my fetal position.

“Why do you even bother?” Jake roll..."


Aww....Did I mention I'm also a sucker for bittersweet endings? :')


message 34: by Autumn (new)

Autumn (flwurautumn) | 4987 comments ~Yue~ [Starless Nights Will Cover Day] wrote: "Oh corny.c:


“Oh come on,” Lucy begged as she intertwined her translucent, skinny fingers with mine in attempt to drag my stubborn body from my fetal position.

“Why do you even bother?” Jake roll..."


eawefkaiowejfe THIS WAS PERFECT.
Okay. That is all.


message 35: by Isaac (new)

Isaac | 8014 comments I LOVE YOU ALL FOR ENTERING.

HAVE A VIRTUAL COOKIE.




message 36: by Isaac (new)

Isaac | 8014 comments I would make you all real cookies but it'd be kind of creepy to stalk all of you and find out where you all live and then travel across the country, possibly even the world, just to stand on your doorstep and hand a cookie to you.


message 37: by Anastasia (new)

Anastasia (booksteainsanity) | 955 comments OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOH. O.O


NOMNOMNOMNOMNOMNOMNOMNOMNOMNOMNOM.


message 38: by Colby (new)

Colby (colbz) | 3211 comments Autumn who is autumny. wrote: "Colby wrote: "My Mother's Will

My mother’s been locked in her bedroom since 2004, when I was seventeen and my father was killed in a tremendous Ferris wheel accident. He was walking through the cr..."


Autumn, I just read the short story A Perfect Day for Bananafish like a week ago, so I find your reaction very coincidental. XD


message 39: by Tesni (last edited Jun 15, 2012 11:55AM) (new)

Tesni (ohmarcello) | 5031 comments Here goes nothing. I feel rather embarassed to be posting something after Yue's story, which was excellent, but I'm basically just in this for the cookies.
>>>>>
We do not talk about the war.
Outside, out in the streets, it’s as if the city is waking up from the longest night in the world, but us…as for us, we’re still in here with our blinds drawn down and the sheets pulled over our heads.

“Must you watch that?”
I drop the curtain back, looking away from the window.
“I…I don’t know what you mean.” Caught between the window and him, neither of which I deserve, I look at the thin line where the skirting board meets the floor.
“Oh, don’t pretend. I see you watching that wheel, of course I do, of course I do. Every morning when you get up at dawn, I know you, I know you. You stand in the kitchen in your nightclothes just so, but with the curtains flung back.” so that if they cared the whole street could see you.
One hand goes self-consciously to my throat, clutching at the ghosts in my collarbone. We do not talk about the things we see; we do not talk about the world outside, and although the neighbours may talk about us they do not talk to us. They do not think him a hero like the rest, if only because of what happens at night.
I tell him again that I don’t know what he’s talking about, but we both do, we always do, which is why we so seldom feel the need to speak. Yet I had thought that the Ferris wheel was mine, though I was a fool to ever think so. Looking out between the chimneys from the window facing south and the stairs on the landing, you cannot miss the sight of something so brassy and bold. If he cared to look, he would see it, anyone would. I watch it because I do not know what else to do, because despite its bright lights and such promises it turns slowly, painfully, with such monotony and silence that I can hardly stand it, such that when he is out I draw all the curtains and weep.
I look because there are few other sights that provide relief between him and the neighbours in the rest of the building that we cannot bear to face in our self-imposed exile.
We do not talk about neighbours. Sometimes, although they are the ones who have brought about our ruin, I find it quite impossible to believe there are any other people in the world.
“Oh, don’t be silly,” I say softly.
“It’s not for us, out there. You know it.”
“Of course I do, dear.” I pour the kettle and bend down to kiss his cheek, lightly, coldly. He shudders. “Now drink your tea.”

If I look of the window, or I’m hanging out the laundry on the roof, I can see the spires of the cathedral and hear those bells, those bells dictating every minute of my life, reminding me that I’m still awake. All of it feels as far away as those places he went, those things he heard and saw that they say I will never even begin to comprehend, that leave him weeping like a child at night. I will never get to understand the things that I can see out of the window whenever I dare to draw back the net curtains to contemplate what I could have, should have, made of my life.
We do not talk about what could have been.

“Where’s the post?”
“I hadn’t brought it up yet.”
“What do you mean you haven’t brought it up yet?”
“I mean just what I said.” I face him evenly, boldly, quite forgetting myself- or maybe remembering myself, remembering the kind of person that I had once been, who wouldn’t have taken anything like this from anyone.
We never talk about the way we were.

He works in the city. It was a long time after his return that he began to look for work, and even longer for him to find any. I waited and we grew thinner than we had been all through the longest winter of the war. It isn’t possible to live on shame and fear for very long.
Every morning, he runs like clockwork; like a piece of clockwork that’s slow and faltering but that would never dream of stopping altogether because the shame would be too great.

I hold the door open for him; nothing has changed.
“Have a good day, darling.”
I have waited six years for this, for the days when I would get back the honour of getting his coat for him, telling him to have a good day if such things existed, and seeing him off at the door.
If there is one thing I had missed, more even than his presence in the bed next to me at night or his laugh or the smell of his cigarettes, it was the creak of his shoes going out onto the landing to catch the morning tram.
We never talk about the things we got back.

I shut the door behind him. I will be there, waiting, when the tram comes back upon the cathedral clock striking six. He would not ever know that I had left my place at the door, not waiting for the ghost of a man who had left that morning but the one who had left however many years ago, taking me in his arms and kissing my cheek chastely in the doorway.
I don’t know why I still wait for the return of that man, but I do.

And now I am quite alone. Out of the window I watch the cathedral, the birds, the Ferris wheel turning so hopefully, so brightly yet so wretchedly; such stunning heights being wrenched away from the stars and crawling back to earth, I can do nothing but lean back against the door and sink to the floor.


message 40: by Isaac (new)

Isaac | 8014 comments GOOD JOB TEZ. :D

Last day guys!


message 41: by Anastasia (new)

Anastasia (booksteainsanity) | 955 comments These are all so good!


message 42: by Colby (new)

Colby (colbz) | 3211 comments Emily [Just call me Mrs. Rogers] wrote: "I would make you all real cookies but it'd be kind of creepy to stalk all of you and find out where you all live and then travel across the country, possibly even the world, just to stand on your d..."

I would have no problem with that. Now bring me teh nomz.


message 43: by Isaac (new)

Isaac | 8014 comments Yeah I will. >.<

Y U ALL SO TALENTED?


message 44: by Isaac (new)

Isaac | 8014 comments I'll be judging them after I eat!


message 45: by Isaac (new)

Isaac | 8014 comments Holy crap, guys, this was sooooooooo hard to judge. All of them were so, so good and I'm not just saying that. This was really tough.

But, sadly, I have to choose one winner.

The winner for this week is Tez!

Everybody pat yourself on the back for being awesome and then pat Tez's!


message 46: by [deleted user] (new)

Congrat's Tez, your story was great:)


message 47: by Isaac (new)

Isaac | 8014 comments Seriously, guys.

Y U SO TALENTED?


message 48: by Isaac (new)

Isaac | 8014 comments Would you like me to start another one or does somebody else want to do it? I'll do it again.


message 49: by Isaac (new)

Isaac | 8014 comments OKAY I'LL JUDGE AGAIN.


message 50: by Tesni (new)

Tesni (ohmarcello) | 5031 comments Emily [Just call me Mrs. Rogers] wrote: "Holy crap, guys, this was sooooooooo hard to judge. All of them were so, so good and I'm not just saying that. This was really tough.

But, sadly, I have to choose one winner.

The winner for thi..."


Livvy [who dances in the rain] wrote: "Congrat's Tez, your story was great:)"

~Yue~ [Starless Nights Will Cover Day] wrote: "CONGRATULATIONS TEZ. *high fives*"


Oh! thank you :3

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