Books on the Nightstand discussion

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Listening to an audiobook while reading the papercopy

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message 1: by Melissa W (new)

Melissa W (melissawiebe80) | 199 comments I don't know why but in the last six months, I suddenly developed a habit in which I read the book while I listen to an audio version of the book. And I am wondering if anybody does the same and I am not alone in doing this.


message 2: by [deleted user] (new)

Melissa W wrote: "I don't know why but in the last six months, I suddenly developed a habit in which I read the book while I listen to an audio version of the book. And I am wondering if anybody does the same and I am not alone in doing this."

I have only done it for one book and that was Wolf Hall (by Hilary Mantel; narrated by Simon Slater.) When I tried to read the text-only, I was baffled and, when I tried to listen to the audio-only, I was equally bemused. Only when I put the two together did it make sense to me :-)

Otherwise, I go into "proofer-mode" wherein I notice the mis-reads! Also, since I read faster than I listen, it's a too-slow process for me to read-and-listen simultaneously.


message 3: by Linda (new)

Linda | 2781 comments Mod
I've only thought about doing it for Ulysses by James Joyce which I had trouble with reading. Unfortunately, I don't sit still very often where I can read AND listen.


message 4: by Ann (new)

Ann (akingman) | 2097 comments Mod
I tried this with Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury. I got frustrated very quickly, as I felt that I was neither listening 100% nor reading 100%. I tend to read faster than the audio, so I kept skimming ahead and then not hearing the narration. Maybe it requires practice. I know I was able to hear a book read out loud and follow along when I was a kid.


message 5: by Melissa W (new)

Melissa W (melissawiebe80) | 199 comments In the six months I have been doing it, it has required a bit more patience on my part, as I can read quite fast at times, depending on what I am reading at the time.


message 6: by Jena (new)

Jena | 21 comments I kinda did this with Pride & Prejudice when I was in grad school--I was terrified of not getting the reading done for a very intense summer course (Early Women Writers), so I listened to the audio throughout the first half of the five-week class, while I was driving or walking, so when I sat down to read over the planned three days of the course, it was quicker & I noticed little things I might've missed if I'd just read it. (I also had a lot of headaches that summer, so lying down with my eye pillow & listening helped me to lose that anxiety that I had too much to do & not enough time to do it.)

Sorry--that's a lot of questionable grammar, isn't it?


message 7: by Janet (new)

Janet (justjanet) | 790 comments I've thought about doing this, especially with more difficult books. Middlemarch: A Study of Provincial Lifecomes to mind. I even went so far as to get both from the library but like many books in my life, I never got around to reading it. :-)


message 8: by [deleted user] (new)

Jena wrote: "Sorry--that's a lot of questionable grammar, isn't it? "

LOL, whether it's questionable grammar or not, I understood what you meant so it's all good in my book! :-)


message 9: by Elizabeth☮ (new)

Elizabeth☮ Linda wrote: "I've only thought about doing it for Ulysses by James Joyce which I had trouble with reading. Unfortunately, I don't sit still very often where I can read AND listen."

this would be a perfect one to read with the audio. when my professor read passages to us, it made perfect sense. otherwise, i was totally confused.


message 10: by Cat (new)

Cat {Wild Night In} (neko_nemo) You're not alone. :) I do this when I can with foreign-language books as I've found it helps me to pronounce things better (and to understand what's going on!).
I don't do this as much with English ones though as I like to knit and listen to the story. I should try it though, especially for the more intense novels.


message 11: by Keith (new)

Keith (emperiux) | 5 comments I am currently doing this with Stephen King's: The Shining. I must say that I find it to be a very effective method, especially for someone like me who will constantly go back and re-read a tiny detail, or something that was not that important to the actual story. When I read to myself I find it harder for me to concentrate on the story because of all the distractions that follow for ex: Notifications from your phone, people talking and cars driving by. Where as when you are listening to the book an reading along you are completely focused on the Novel.


message 12: by Britany (last edited Dec 08, 2016 08:36AM) (new)

Britany | 540 comments I actually always get both the physical book and audiobook. I tend to listen while driving to/from work. I tend to zone out sometimes, so when I get home skim through the section I just listened to and catch anything I may have missed. Also, sometimes you miss extras in the physical book- thinking about memoirs that include photos.


message 13: by Keith (new)

Keith (emperiux) | 5 comments It is easier to get through a novel in my honest opinion. Something about how the narrator impersonates the characters with such detail. What book are you currently reading?


message 14: by Wendy (new)

Wendy Cosin | 13 comments I both listened to and read "A Brief History of Seven Killings". Given the amount of dialect, I don't think I could have only read the paper version. The audio is brilliantly performed by multiple readers and, especially since the novel's chapters are narrated by different people, it worked beautifully.

In general, I usually only listen to non-fiction because I listen while I drive and I don't want to have to keep track of plot points.


message 15: by Jackie (new)

Jackie | 4 comments I started listening to The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood on audio which is read by the actress Claire Danes. I was lukewarm about the narration at best. I then switched to the print version because I wasn't going to have much opportunity to finish listening to it in the car, and I didn't want to forget the story (plus it was getting interesting). Once I started reading the book, I gained a whole new appreciation for Ms. Danes' narration as she captured the overall tone of despair in the novel beautifully. While I don't often switch between audio and print, this is one instance I am very glad that I did.


message 16: by Keith (new)

Keith (emperiux) | 5 comments I have finished The Shining and now I am reading The Cell by Stephen King. I am also listening to it on audio while reading/following along.


message 17: by Keith (new)

Keith (emperiux) | 5 comments It has been almost an entire year since I last visited this chat. I am currently reading Ernest Hemingway: A Farewell To Arms.


message 18: by Sydney (new)

Sydney Young (sydyoung) | 38 comments I've gotten to where I almost always do both! If I'm really into a book, I want it whichever way I want, so I'll read it with all three versions. 🤷🏻‍♀️😎🥂 I love whisphersync and the low prices I get if I combo the kindle and audio.


message 19: by Laura (new)

Laura | 90 comments I often listen to an audio book to reread a book. That way I'm familiar with the plot and characters so if I daydream a little, I haven't missed anything crucial. I read When Dimple Met Rishi over the holidays and after finishing it I went to right to my library's website to download the audio version.


message 20: by Gina (new)

Gina | 1 comments While googling "is an audiobook word for word the same as a book" no answer came up ... but this thread did. I love audiobooks. We all have different ways of learning / grasping. I'm finding being older that listening to audiobooks - the info really sinks in - much better than reading for me now. However, thanks to your thread, I will try both!


message 21: by Linda (new)

Linda | 2781 comments Mod
Gina wrote: "While googling "is an audiobook word for word the same as a book" no answer came up ... but this thread did. I love audiobooks. We all have different ways of learning / grasping. I'm finding being ..."

Gina, I am definitely older and have come to realize that with me, there are various aspects that determine if the audio sinks in or the printed page. An in-depth nonfiction book, I would be better to read, but a mystery or other lighter fiction I could easily listen to.

I recently started to listen to The Weight of Ink by Rachel Kadish The Weight of Ink. Since the book bounces between then and now, I quickly realized that reading would be the better media over listening.

Sometimes the narrator makes a book. Lily and the Octopus by Steven Rowley Lily and the Octopus, despite it's unfortunate story line completely won me over because of the narration by Michael Urie. It just wouldn't have been AS enjoyable with out Urie's interpretation.

And, welcome to the group and the thread.


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