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message 1: by Ilyn (new)

Ilyn Ross (ilyn_ross) | 1071 comments Mod
Enjoy


message 2: by Joy H. (last edited Nov 01, 2008 01:28PM) (new)

Joy H. (joyofglensfalls) Thanks, Ilyn. I've created a new post in General II.

BTW, you're name is very unusual. I've never heard the name "Ilyn" before. Is there a history to it?


message 3: by Ilyn (last edited Nov 01, 2008 02:16PM) (new)

Ilyn Ross (ilyn_ross) | 1071 comments Mod
My pleasure, Joy. Thank you for posting lovely topics.

"Ilyn" is the last four characters of the given name of a family member's favorite actress. "I" in Ilyn is in honor of the word "I".


message 4: by Joy H. (last edited Nov 02, 2008 07:30AM) (new)

Joy H. (joyofglensfalls) That's interesting, Ilyn.
Was the name Marilyn? (Mar ilyn)

Or was it one of the following:
1. äksyilyn
2. äkäilyn
3. ailyn
4. arilyn
6. bernard bailyn
7. brandilyn
8. cailyn
9. carilyn
10. cherilyn
11. craig cwm silyn
12. devilyn
13. dilyn
14. emily marilyn
15. evilyn
17. gailyn bailyn
18. gerrilyn
19. heilyn
22. jamilyn
23. jennilyn
24. jerilyn
25. jerrilyn
26. josilyn
27. kailyn
28. katilyn
29. kerilyn
30. manilyn
31. marilyn
32. merilyn
33. merrilyn
35. newyddilyn
37. nynnyilyn
38. nyrkkeilyn
39. näppäilyn
40. penilyn
41. sharilyn
42. sherilyn
43. terrilyn

Which actress was it? (grin)

How did I get the list above?
Well, I was curious and went to onelook.com and searched for words which end with "Ilyn".

Here are the steps I took:
At onelook.com I saw the list of "Example searches"

I checked out the example which said: "Find words and phrases that end with "bird".

I checked out that example.

Then, I replaced their example with: *Ilyn

Then I clicked and VOILA! I saw the list above.
(I've edited the list, taking out the least important items).

Here's a link to onelook.com: ===>
http://www.onelook.com/

I use onelook.com all the time!


message 5: by Arthur (new)

Arthur | 4 comments I thought it could be shorter than Elaine


message 6: by Ilyn (last edited Nov 02, 2008 07:43AM) (new)

Ilyn Ross (ilyn_ross) | 1071 comments Mod
:) :) :)

The actress was Marilyn Monroe. My favorite author, Ayn Rand, also liked Marilyn Monroe a lot.

"We are all born sexual creatures, thank God, but it's a pity so many people despise and crush this natural gift."

- Marilyn Monroe


message 7: by Arthur (new)

Arthur | 4 comments Marilyn Monroe was an awesome actress. But Not that I remember her from then in pictures, just all hollywood likes change. I remember people talk about Elvis's death.


message 8: by Ilyn (new)

Ilyn Ross (ilyn_ross) | 1071 comments Mod
From: http://www.capmag.com/article.asp?ID=...

Marilyn Monroe: Through Your Most Grievous Fault
by Ayn Rand

This commentary by Ayn Rand, excerpted from The Voice of Reason, was originally published two weeks after Marilyn Monroe's death on August 5, 1962.

The death of Marilyn Monroe shocked people with an impact different from their reaction to the death of any other movie star or public figure. All over the world, people felt a peculiar sense of personal involvement and of protest, like a universal cry of "Oh, no!"

They felt that her death had some special significance, almost like a warning which they could not decipher--and they felt a nameless apprehension, the sense that something terribly wrong was involved.

They were right to feel it.

Marilyn Monroe on the screen was an image of pure, innocent, childlike joy in living. She projected the sense of a person born and reared in some radiant utopia untouched by suffering, unable to conceive of ugliness or evil, facing life with the confidence, the benevolence, and the joyous self-flaunting of a child or a kitten who is happy to display its own attractiveness as the best gift it can offer the world, and who expects to be admired for it, not hurt.

In real life, Marilyn Monroe's probable suicide--or worse: a death that might have been an accident, suggesting that, to her, the difference did not matter--was a declaration that we live in a world which made it impossible for her kind of spirit, and for the things she represented, to survive.

If there ever was a victim of society, Marilyn Monroe was that victim--of a society that professes dedication to the relief of the suffering, but kills the joyous.

None of the objects of the humanitarians' tender solicitude, the juvenile delinquents, could have had so sordid and horrifying a childhood as did Marilyn Monroe.

To survive it and to preserve the kind of spirit she projected on the screen--the radiantly benevolent sense of life, which cannot be faked--was an almost inconceivable psychological achievement that required a heroism of the highest order. Whatever scars her past had left were insignificant by comparison.

She preserved her vision of life through a nightmare struggle, fighting her way to the top. What broke her was the discovery, at the top, of as sordid an evil as the one she had left behind--worse, perhaps, because incomprehensible. She had expected to reach the sunlight; she found, instead, a limitless swamp of malice.

It was a malice of a very special kind. If you want to see her groping struggle to understand it, read the magnificent article in the August 17, 1962, issue of Life magazine. It is not actually an article, it is a verbatim transcript of her own words--and the most tragically revealing document published in many years. It is a cry for help, which came too late to be answered.

"When you're famous, you kind of run into human nature in a raw kind of way," she said. "It stirs up envy, fame does. People you run into feel that, well, who is she--who does she think she is, Marilyn Monroe? They feel fame gives them some kind of privilege to walk up to you and say anything to you, you know, of any kind of nature--and it won't hurt your feelings--like it's happening to your clothing. . . . I don't understand why people aren't a little more generous with each other. I don't like to say this, but I'm afraid there is a lot of envy in this business."

"Envy" is the only name she could find for the monstrous thing she faced, but it was much worse than envy: it was the profound hatred of life, of success and of all human values, felt by a certain kind of mediocrity--the kind who feels pleasure on hearing about a stranger's misfortune. It was hatred of the good for being the good--hatred of ability, of beauty, of honesty, of earnestness, of achievement and, above all, of human joy.

Read the Life article to see how it worked and what it did to her:

An eager child, who was rebuked for her eagerness--"Sometimes the [foster:] families used to worry because I used to laugh so loud and so gay; I guess they felt it was hysterical."

A spectacularly successful star, whose employers kept repeating: "Remember you're not a star," in a determined effort, apparently, not to let her discover her own importance.

A brilliantly talented actress, who was told by the alleged authorities, by Hollywood, by the press, that she could not act.

An actress, dedicated to her art with passionate earnestness--"When I was 5--I think that's when I started wanting to be an actress--I loved to play. I didn't like the world around me because it was kind of grim--but I loved to play house and it was like you could make your own boundaries"--who went through hell to make her own boundaries, to offer people the sunlit universe of her own vision--"It's almost having certain kinds of secrets for yourself that you'll let the whole world in on only for a moment, when you're acting"--but who was ridiculed for her desire to play serious parts.

A woman, the only one, who was able to project the glowingly innocent sexuality of a being from some planet uncorrupted by guilt--who found herself regarded and ballyhooed as a vulgar symbol of obscenity--and who still had the courage to declare: "We are all born sexual creatures, thank God, but it's a pity so many people despise and crush this natural gift."

A happy child who was offering her achievement to the world, with the pride of an authentic greatness and of a kitten depositing a hunting trophy at your feet--who found herself answered by concerted efforts to negate, to degrade, to ridicule, to insult, to destroy her achievement--who was unable to conceive that it was her best she was punished for, not her worst--who could only sense, in helpless terror, that she was facing some unspeakable kind of evil.

How long do you think a human being could stand it?

That hatred of values has always existed in some people, in any age or culture. But a hundred years ago, they would have been expected to hide it. Today, it is all around us; it is the style and fashion of our century.

Where would a sinking spirit find relief from it?

The evil of a cultural atmosphere is made by all those who share it. Anyone who has ever felt resentment against the good for being the good and has given voice to it, is the murderer of Marilyn Monroe.

*
Russian born American novelist Ayn Rand is author of Atlas Shrugged and The Fountainhead and is originator of the philosophy of Objectivism. You can learn more about her life and philosophy at the website of the Ayn Rand Institute.


message 9: by Catamorandi (last edited Nov 02, 2008 08:58AM) (new)

Catamorandi (wwwgoodreadscomprofilerandi) My take on Marilyn Monroe:

She was superb on the screen. She always carried a child-like innocence in all her roles. This child-like innocence went far beyond the screen. She had the same child-like innocence in her life off-screen as she did on screen. Marilyn Monroe shot up to big-time fame quickly. She wasn't ready for it. Inside, she was still Norma Jean Baker. She needed drugs and alcohol to help her accept all of this new fame. She couldn't handle it on her own. She played her part very well. People thought that she was a queen and she let them. However, poor little Norma Jean couldn't handle it. She never could. She felt like she needed a man to hang onto her whole adult life. She was a child in an adult body with adult actions. She couldn't handle the fame anymore. She tragically went into a world that was too much for her, and it killed her.


message 10: by Arthur (new)

Arthur | 4 comments What an extraordinary article by Rand. "- through hell to make her own borders, to offer people the sunlit universe of her own vision -" Very actress like manners, so convincing, as always, a popular model.


message 11: by Joy H. (new)

Joy H. (joyofglensfalls) Ilyn, I figured the actress ending in ilyn was Marilyn Monroe. (g)

I once heard the following anecdote (paraphrased):
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Marilyn Monroe was always late coming onto the set and she couldn't remember her lines. This upset everyone on the set, including the other actors. One executive complained and suggested that Marilyn be replaced. Another executive countered this suggestion by saying something to the effect:
"Well, my Aunt Mary would come to the set on time and would remember all her lines. Shall we replace Marilyn with my Aunt Mary?"
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



message 12: by Ilyn (new)

Ilyn Ross (ilyn_ross) | 1071 comments Mod
I know you did, Joy :) - the onelook.com list made me smile.

Hi Randi, Arthur, and everyone. Happy election day.


message 13: by Stephen (last edited Nov 05, 2008 11:19AM) (new)

Stephen (photoscribe) | 55 comments The one thing I always found remarkable about Marilyn Monroe is that she, unlike just about every OTHER major movie star from the past, hasn't got ONE well-known stinker to her name, as far as vehicles are concerned! Even Audrey Hepburn had at least one or two bombs to her credit...(ever see "How to Steal a Million" or "Bloodline"?) Cary Grant is one of the few other stars that you cn say that about. Everybody else, at LEAST a half-dozen apiece!!

Stephen H. Turner
The Last Voyage of the Cassiopeia
Almagest: The Adventures of MarsShield
3700
The Avedon Question


message 14: by Pam (new)

Pam Broderick | 5 comments I agree. It think Marilyn Monroe was an exceptional singer too. I loved her songs in Gentlemen Prefer Blonds and The River of No Return. I think she also had the gift of appealing to men but not making women jealous. You kind of were protective of her in an odd way.
Pam Broderick


message 15: by Ilyn (new)

Ilyn Ross (ilyn_ross) | 1071 comments Mod
Hello Steve, Pam, and everyone. Have a marvelous day.


message 16: by Stephen (new)

Stephen (photoscribe) | 55 comments Yes, there was a definite savvy innocence to Marilyn that few present-day actresses can equal. I don't know about you, but don't most of the "stars" that have popped up from the early eighties to today seem like they were all ripped from the varsity football and cheerleading teams of some massive, archtypical high school somewhere? NOBODY STANDS OUT!! Maybe Nicole Kidman, Maybe Mia Sara. Anne Hathaway. Matthew Broderick. Kirsten Dunst....but on the whole, a bunch of ciphers!!

Tain't a Cary, Redford, Doris Day, Audrey or Katherine Hepburn or Yul Brynner in the lot!!

Stephen H. Turner
The Last Voyage of the Cassiopeia
Almagest: The Adventures of MarsShield
3700
The Avedon Question


message 17: by Ilyn (new)

Ilyn Ross (ilyn_ross) | 1071 comments Mod
I am using many true events as background for my second novel, Royal Serf (I just started writing it). The following is an excerpt:

CHAPTER 8

Princess Diana was named after the Queen Mother. A doctor of medicine, then Queen Diana was actively involved in many charities including hospitals, schools, orphanages, foster homes, and adoptions. She was very happy when the engagement of then Prince William and Aryanna was announced in 1988.

Late afternoon, Queen Diana left an orphanage where she spent the whole day. Her driver opened the car door for her.

“Thank you, Tiger.” The Queen was known for giving nicknames to her security detail.

“You’re welcome, Ma’am.” Tiger had been with the Queen for nine years. His young partner was new to the job. Queen Diana delighted in the young woman whom she nicknamed Agent-10 because of her beauty and competence.

Agent-10 briefed the Queen on the news and events of the day. The beauty capped the briefing by recounting the reaction of the media and the public to the royal engagement. The Queen asked many detailed questions.

That night, Queen Diana was kept awake by images of swarms of reporters and photographers incessantly following the newly engaged Prince William and Aryanna. The prince’s mother was greatly bothered by complete fabrications and indecent conjectures in numerous headlines and reportage. “Many media outlets are profiting at the expense of William and Aryanna. How could people patronize filth?”

The Queen was saddened that many reporters who researched facts included private details in their articles. She pondered for many days after rereading an article about her son’s fiancée:

Aryanna was a model, singer, and actress. Her parents divorced before she was born. Her mother was mentally unstable and financially unable to care for her, so she placed Aryanna with foster parents. The mother continued to try her best to make a life for herself and Aryanna. After buying a house, the mother was allowed to take back her child. A few months after, the mother suffered a breakdown. The child Aryanna cried as her mother screamed and laughed while being forcibly removed to a mental hospital. Aryanna was taken to an orphanage. She spent much of her childhood in a succession of foster homes.

In a Life magazine interview, long before she met then Prince William, Aryanna said the following:

“When I was a child, I didn't like the world around me because it was grim, so I played pretend. I loved to role-play because you could make your own boundaries, you could make your own situations and pretend. I relished the imagining part where you could say to other kids, ‘Hey, what about if you were such and such, and I were such and such - wouldn't that be fun?’ I enjoyed the playfulness. When I heard this was acting, I said that's what I want to be. I was five. I decided then that I wanted to be an actress. My favorite actress was Marilyn Monroe.

My foster families used to send me to the movies to get me out of the house. I'd sit there all day and way into the night, a little kid all alone with no popcorn. Up in front, I didn't miss anything; I loved everything that happened on the big screen. I always wanted to be happy. Sometimes, the families worried because I used to laugh so loud and so gay; I guess they felt it was hysterical.

When I was eleven, I would ask the boys, ‘Can I ride your bike?’ and they'd say, ‘Sure.’ Then I'd go zooming, riding down the block, laughing in the wind. I loved the wind. It caressed me. The world became friendly. But it was a double edged thing - people could take a lot for granted, get overly friendly, and expect an awful lot for very little.

I often tell children that I used to work for five pennies a month washing one hundred dishes. The kids would say, ‘One hundred dishes!’ I would reply, ‘Not only that; I scraped and cleaned them before I washed them. I washed them and rinsed them and put them in the draining place, but thank God, I didn't have to dry them.’

It is the creative part that keeps me trying to be an actress. That, and l also have to eat. I have never been kept, to be blunt about it. I have always kept myself. I have always had pride in the fact that I was my own.

When you are famous, every weakness is exaggerated. In this industry, you don't dare get a cold. I mean, the executives can get colds and stay home forever, but how dare you, the actor, get a cold or a virus. The movie executives evade that no one feels worse than the one who's sick.

I always want to arrive at work prepared to give a performance to the best of my ability. But there are people who push you to rush and go fast for no good reason.

An actor is not a machine, no matter how often movie studios say so. Creativity has got to start with humanity and when you're a human being, you feel, you suffer. You're gay, you're sick, you're nervous. There is a need for aloneness for an actor, which I don't think most people realize. It's almost having certain kinds of secrets for yourself that you'll let the whole world in on only for a moment, when you're acting. But everybody is always tugging at you. They'd all like a chunk of you. They like to take pieces out of you.

But you do want to stay intact. Intact and on two feet.

Often, terrible things are written about me and I worry that they would hurt those who love me. I tell them to ask me about these things straight out and I'll answer all their questions. After all, I have come up from way down. I have fame now, but that's not where I live.

When I'm acting on the screen or when I greet people in person - I really always do mean hello and how are you? It's an honor, and I love them for it when the faces of teenagers and little kids light up and say ‘Gee, I can't wait to tell my friends!’, when old people come up and say, ‘Wait till I tell my spouse; you've changed my whole day.’, when working men whistle and then say, ‘Gosh, it's Aryanna!’ Those times are nice - people knowing who you are and feeling that you've meant something to them.

But when you're famous, you also run into envious people, and experience their nature in a raw kind of way. Fame stirs up envy. Some people feel my fame gives them privilege to walk up to me and say anything offensive or insulting, and it won't hurt me, like it's happening to my clothing.

Some actors or directors don't usually say it to me, but they say it to the newspapers because that's a bigger play - insulting me to my face doesn't make a big enough play because all I have to say is, ‘See you around, like never.’ But if it's in the newspapers, it's all around the world.

Fame has a special burden, which I might as well state here and now. I don't mind being burdened with being glamorous and sexual. But what goes with it can be a burden. One time, I stopped at this place while looking for a home to buy. A very pleasant, cheerful man came out and said, ‘Oh, just a moment, I want my wife to meet you.’ She came out and said, ‘Will you please get off the premises?’

I hate to be a commodity, which a sex symbol becomes. But if I'm going to be a symbol of something, I'd rather have it sex than some other things they've got symbols of!

We are all born sexual creatures, thank God, but it's a pity so many people despise and crush this natural gift.

I don't understand why people aren't a little more generous with each other. I don't like to say this, but there is a lot of envy in this business. The only thing I can do is stop and think, ‘I'm all right, but I'm not so sure about them!’”

* continued in the next post


message 18: by Ilyn (new)

Ilyn Ross (ilyn_ross) | 1071 comments Mod
* continuation

Queen Diana thought, “Everyone has a right to privacy. That the public would not accord such respect to the royals compels me to act.”

Following the royal engagement, Prince William and Aryanna were invited to numerous public appearances. Their schedules became extremely hectic, yet they were viciously ridiculed when they couldn’t accept an invitation. Some tabloid headlines read:

“Future King and Queen Snub Poor Community”

“No Royal Time for the Downtrodden”

“Worthless Royals!”

“Show Up and Serve!”

“Do Your Duty, Or Else!”

Queen Diana lamented privately. “The royals are public property. We have a multitude of masters. We do not own our lives – ours is but to obey public opinion!”


message 19: by [deleted user] (new)

Ilyn wrote: "* continuation

Queen Diana thought, “Everyone has a right to privacy. That the public would not accord such respect to the royals compels me to act.”

Following the royal engagement, Prince Wi..."


Very interesting viewpoint.




message 20: by [deleted user] (new)

Ilyn wrote: ":) :) :)

The actress was Marilyn Monroe. My favorite author, Ayn Rand, also liked Marilyn Monroe a lot.

"We are all born sexual creatures, thank God, but it's a pity so many people despise ..."


I never knew she made this comment. I have a book about her by Norman Mailer I believe and he says that she was murdered which was very shocking to me at the time I bought the book. When I was very young I hated her and was jealous but later when I realized what she had made of herself by hard work I came to admire her very much.




message 21: by [deleted user] (new)

Pam wrote: "I agree. It think Marilyn Monroe was an exceptional singer too. I loved her songs in Gentlemen Prefer Blonds and The River of No Return. I think she also had the gift of appealing to men but not ma..."

I recently had to buy The River of No Return. There were too many cliques but I did admire Marilyn in it.




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