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message 1: by Sandra (new)

Sandra (skwoodiwiss) | 3 comments Spencer and I are reading Shelby Foote's "The Civil War: A Narrative." I'm really enjoying it, Spencer wants to go back to the History Channel - but he does pick up when Wm. T Sherman is metioned. Can anyone tell me what book is best on Sherman -any recommends?
Thanks in advance.


message 2: by Jan C (new)

Jan C (woeisme) | 160 comments He wrote a memoir. Memoirs of General William T Sherman: Shiloh, Vicksburg, and the March to the Sea

I think I read this in college. Not sure whether I remember how readable it was since it was a while ago.

But that why he could go straight to the horse's mouth.


message 3: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (aussierick) | 948 comments I have this book in my library but have not read it yet but it may be worth while checking out:


The White Tecumseh A Biography of General William T. Sherman by Stanley P. Hirshson by Stanley P. Hirshson
Reviews:
"Utilizing regimental histories, historian Hirshon offers a sympathetic yet excellent biography of one of the more noted Civil War generals, best remembered for burning Atlanta, cutting a swath of destruction across Georgia, then creating total destruction in South Carolina, including the burning of Columbia. Hirshon gives us an insight into how Sherman's own troops felt about him and his relationships with fellow generals, especially Grant. The author not only describes Sherman's role in the war but also details his early life and family problems. The latter part of the book deals with his life after the war, especially with the Indians in the West as well as his relationships with Presidents Johnson and Grant. This work focuses more closely on Sherman's battles and marches than most other biographies do and discusses his failures and accomplishments in detail. Highly recommended." - Library Journal

"A sympathetic biography that seems undecided whether to focus on Sherman the warrior or Sherman the family man. As Hirshson (History/Queens Coll.; The Lion of the Lord, 1969, etc.) himself notes in his preface, this is hardly the first recent study of Sherman. In fact, the general has been poked and prodded quite a lot of late, and Hirshson compares his experience watching various works emerge to ``the academic equivalent of having the contents of a six-shooter slowly emptied into one's body.'' Still, he has tried to turn this to his advantage, showing where his predecessors failed to use all available sources while at the same time culling from their works what he found useful. The result is a competent biography that, to justify its existence, stresses the importance of regimental histories of the Civil War, on which Hirshson relied most heavily. The problem is that while he spotlights them, it's clear that the more personal interactions of the Sherman family, especially the relationship between Sherman and his wife, Ellen, seem to be closest to his heart. The Sherman who emerges is a tormented man who, like his friend Ulysses S. Grant, tried his hand at a number of (mostly unsuccessful) ventures in the private sector but returned to the army during the Civil War to claim his share of glory. Sherman's record during that conflict is more difficult to categorize than Grant's, and it would be hard to point to a battle that he actually won. More impressive, claims Hirshson, were Sherman's marches, especially his famous (or infamous) March to the Sea through Georgia in 1864, which the author claims could have been accomplished only by a superbly skilled officer. Not the most comprehensive biography, but a good supplement for those eager to understand the ``firebug'' in all his somewhat dubious glory." - Kirkus Reviews

"As is true of most complicated historical figures, the way Sherman looks depends on how the historian looks at him. Hirshson disagrees "completely" with the previous biography, Citizen Sherman, by Michael Fellman (1995), which delved into speculative psychobiography. What Sherman did, rather than why he did it or what racialist attitudes he harbored, matters most to Hirshson. And since Sherman was a soldier, that means a helluva lot of soldiering goes on in this book, which consequently reads like the hundreds of regimental histories the author consulted for this work. The detail, though, doesn't obscure the main and well-known events of Sherman's career, from prewar business failures to wartime battles and campaigns to postwar matters, like writing his memoirs, putting down the Indians, and putting up with importunate politicians. Adopting a posture as Sherman's defense counsel, Hirshson argues that he was better at maneuvering than at set-piece battling, a view the bloody results of Shiloh and Kennesaw Mountain support. A carefully researched, closely written work for seasoned Civil War buffs." - Booklist


message 4: by Sandra (new)

Sandra (skwoodiwiss) | 3 comments Jan C wrote: "He wrote a memoir. Memoirs of General William T Sherman: Shiloh, Vicksburg, and the March to the Sea

I think I read this in college. Not sure whether I remember how readable it wa..."


thank you!!


message 5: by David (new)

David Elkin | 62 comments Sherman's autobiography is free in ebook format. He doesn't write as well as Grant did. I also found Longstreet's bio more enjoyable. At times, I have felt Sherman gets a little more credit than he deserves. However, the book I enjoyed most about Sherman was named "Grant and Sherman: The Friendship That Won the Civil War" by Charles Bracelen Flood (Oct 24, 2006)

A super book that brought them both to life-Amazon has it for under $7 both in print and ebook format.


message 6: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (aussierick) | 948 comments That's a Good recommendation David in regards to the book; "Grant and Sherman: The Friendship That Won the Civil War".

Grant and Sherman The Friendship That Won the Civil War by Charles Bracelen Flood by Charles Bracelen Flood


message 7: by Sandra (new)

Sandra (skwoodiwiss) | 3 comments David wrote: "Sherman's autobiography is free in ebook format. He doesn't write as well as Grant did. I also found Longstreet's bio more enjoyable. At times, I have felt Sherman gets a little more credit than he..."

Thank you both so much - it's on the read list


message 8: by Vince (new)

Vince | 11 comments You should try "Southern Storm:Sherman's March to the Sea" by Noah Andre Trudeau. It is excellent. A very good book on that phase of Sherman's career in the Civil War. Trudeau pieces together stories told by his officers & soldiers, the civilians it effected and the Confederates to give a great account of the campaign.


message 9: by Lia (new)

Lia | 96 comments Och that devil Sherman and his total war. Speaking as a Southerner that is! But he got the job done and is a compelling character. When we kids would run through the house or raise a ruckus my ma would just say, "like Sherman through Georgia"!


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