Banned and Challenged Books discussion

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What do you think is the main reason that books are challenged?

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message 1: by Emma (new)

Emma (emma1919) I think that the main reason is that parents feel that they need to protect their kids. You could also argue that the reason is that christians are upset by anything that doesn't agree with their beliefs or makes them look like idiots.


message 2: by Danny (new)

Danny (donkey-kong) | 3 comments I think its because there are people out there who get offended too easily or feel that children need to be sheltered to the point even books with minor things they don't agree they feel should be banned.


message 3: by Emma (new)

Emma (emma1919) Danny wrote: "I think its because there are people out there who get offended too easily or feel that children need to be sheltered to the point even books with minor things they don't agree they feel should be ..."

Yeah, I think the whole sheltered thing is the biggest factor. Some parents just don't realize that kids just need to learn about things at their own pace and shouldn't be monitered and sheltered and what not.


message 4: by Jazz (new)

Jazz (jazzae251) Bri wrote: "Danny wrote: "I think its because there are people out there who get offended too easily or feel that children need to be sheltered to the point even books with minor things they don't agree they f..."

I can understand that to a certain degree, though. I wouldn't agree to a book like The Perks of Being A Wallflower in a middle school library. But, I think it's cool for it to be in a high school or college library.

With today's youth being so out there, I don't necessarily think there should abridged or outright banned books. I do feel that there should be some boundaries for certain age groups.


message 5: by Emma (new)

Emma (emma1919) Dani wrote: "Bri wrote: "Danny wrote: "I think its because there are people out there who get offended too easily or feel that children need to be sheltered to the point even books with minor things they don't ..."

Where would you draw the line though? I think that something like that should be a personal choice. I mean, some people are much more mature than their peers, so would you prevent them from reading certain books just because their classmates can't handle it?


message 6: by Jazz (new)

Jazz (jazzae251) Bri wrote: "Dani wrote: "Bri wrote: "Danny wrote: "I think its because there are people out there who get offended too easily or feel that children need to be sheltered to the point even books with minor thing..."

I agree that some people are more mature than their peers, but I really don't think it's alright (using The Perks of a Wallflower as reference again) to give a 14-year old a book that hints at killing, has drugs, and has some sexual content. No matter how mature they are, a 14-year old still isn't 19 and wouldn't be able to really understand the complexity (may be too big word) that comes with that kind of stuff.


message 7: by Emma (new)

Emma (emma1919) Well, a 14 year-old would be a freshman in highschool and I think that any highschooler is mature enough(in theory because some highschoolers are pretty dumb)to decide what they want to read. I think that once you're out of elementary school (in most cases) you should be old enough to make literary choices for yourself.


message 8: by Jazz (last edited Nov 26, 2011 01:35PM) (new)

Jazz (jazzae251) Yeah, I thought about the 14-year old freshman thing. But, there are alot of 14-year old that I know or know of who are in the 8th (and sadly) 7th grade. So, middle school usually goes with the 11- to 14-year old age group for me. I wouldn't be okay with any 11-year old I know reading a mature book. But, people have different opinions and I respect yours.


message 9: by Emma (new)

Emma (emma1919) But where would you draw the line between mature and juvinile fiction? And, there are a lot of things in history, world politics and current events that some people would consider inappropriate for young people. How would you draw a line there?


message 10: by Jazz (last edited Nov 26, 2011 02:11PM) (new)

Jazz (jazzae251) You really have look hard at what's in the book. Obviously there some things that kids really shouldn't be exposed to, like sexually explicit books, books that are overly violent, has drug-related material, and would be equivalent to a R-rated movie.

When you talk about historical ficion you have to think about the type of book it is. Is it a book like The Things They Carried by Tim O'Brien which has cussing and hints at sex and rape, but as a whole is a novel that discusses a person's character and the psychological part of war or a historical fiction like that has all out rape, sex scenes, murder, military-style cussing (trust me, completely different), etc.

It really depends on the content, not so much the subject. There's a difference between sheltering a kid and just making sure you don't expose them something they can't handle.


message 11: by Kirsty (new)

Kirsty (kirkel) | 4 comments If films have an age guidance then I don't see why books shouldn't. If you look up specific film ratings they detail why they have been graded that way - it would be useful for parents, teachers and librarians to have the same system for reference.


message 12: by Emma (new)

Emma (emma1919) Kirsty wrote: "If films have an age guidance then I don't see why books shouldn't. If you look up specific film ratings they detail why they have been graded that way - it would be useful for parents, teachers an..."

Yes, but you shouldn't be required to follow the guide lines, right? I mean since when has a PG-13 rating stopped anyone under 13 from seeing it.


message 13: by Kristine (new)

Kristine (leggygal) | 3 comments I would have thought books were banned in line with cultural and social mores. Having said that,as a child (and now) if something was banned it just seemed all the more tantalising - enquiring minds want to know what could possibly be so bad as to require banning?
Interesting to see the divisions of http://www.banned-books.org.uk/ whose categories include "too political" and "anti-religious" along with too much sex and/or violence - in their banned for children section.
I agree with Kirsty that age guidance might be appropriate, but also with Bri, that it probably would be ignored.


message 14: by Danny (new)

Danny (donkey-kong) | 3 comments The whole thing about movie ratings are they are way to strict on censuring them. The smallest thing makes them have a pg 13 or higher rating. For books they'd have to be a lot more lenient or little kids wouldn't be able to read anything above doctor Seuss until they were in middle school.


message 15: by Stef (new)

Stef Rozitis | 2 comments Considering what sort of mind-polluting rubbish gets deliberately and freely marketed specifically to children (especially gender-offensive essentialist crap), I would have to say I think the "protecting children" argument is pretty morally bankrupt.

I figured my kids were going to be exposed to a whole lot of stuff that I didn;t approve of so my only choice was to teach them to be critical, informed readers who make careful choices about what to read and believe.

There were books I didn;t want in the house and there were also books I steered them toward, so I am not pretending I threw my hands in the air and didn;t try to effect their reading.

But I think ignorance and naivety are far more dangerous for children than having choices and learning critical skills.


message 16: by Marcelly (new)

Marcelly Chrisostimo (chrisostimo) | 1 comments I think about it almost everyday on my job. It is really hard to be a school librarian nowadays, where kids have access to all different kinds of information you can imagine and we don't see any kind of control there. Where are their parents?

I believe that some kids are mature enough to decide what they wanna read, to see by their own that a title is not suitable for them and stop reading. I have some kids that do it, and I feel so proud of them. But I have some as well that don't even think about it.

Come on, guys, we were teenagers once. Teens think they know EVERYTHING! They don't recongnize the word NO. And they get upset with you when you do it.

I work in a senior school, where I have different kinds of titles and classifications. When a 13 years old kid comes to me and ask to read a title that I consider too high level for him for different reasons, I don't say just NO, you can't. I try to understand his reasons to do it, I try to talk to them and make he see that is not for him. And at most of the cases, I am successfull on it.

But, I need to say, what gets me upset is when I see the media, publishers, authors and etc. classifying a deep, violent or sexual title for a lower age group than it should be. For example: The Hunger Games is indicated to 13+. GOD, it is a killing reality show where everybody watch everyone killing each other. I loved this trilogy and read it at once but I don't feel confortable when I see students so young reading it...

We can't just say to them what they can or can't do. We need to help them to figure it out. We need to motivate them to think and to see that there is a right time for everything.


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