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Writer Q & A (Archived) > Q and A with Barbara Watkins

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message 1: by A.F. (last edited Nov 04, 2011 06:14AM) (new)

A.F. (scribe77) | 1777 comments Mod
Please welcome author Barbara Watkins to our Q & A discussions. Barbara Watkins is an author from Southeast Missouri. Her main genre of interest is -but not limited to- Paranormal/Thrillers. Her published books include the two novellas, Behind the Red Door and Thorns of an Innocent Soul, and a collection of short stories entitled, Nightmares & Daydreams.
In 2005, her novella Behind the Red Door sparked the interest of Escape Artists Studio and in return, they requested a copy. Her articles on various subjects, short stories, and poetry, have appeared in The Heartland Writers Guild, 2008 New York Skyline Review, and several on-line publications.
Currently she has completed her first full-length novel entitled, Hollowing Screams, a psychological thriller bursting with intrigue, murder, and suspense.

Goodreads Profile: Barbara Watkins

Nightmares & Daydreams by Barbara Watkins Behind the Red Door by Barbara Watkins Thorns of an Innocent Soul Novella by Barbara Watkins On the Hill A Photographic History of the University of Kansas by Barbara Watkins Mortal Abomination by Barbara Watkins Hollowing Screams by Barbara Watkins


message 2: by D.D. Chant (new)

D.D. Chant (DDChant) | 33 comments Hi Barbara!

Where do you get the ideas for your stories?

Do they start out as a scene that you can't get out of your head and you keep wondering 'What if'?

Or do you know how your book is going to end right from the start?


message 3: by Barbara (new)

Barbara Watkins (barbarawatkins) | 19 comments A.F. wrote: "Please welcome author Barbara Watkins to our Q & A discussions. Barbara Watkins is an author from Southeast Missouri. Her main genre of interest is -but not limited to- Paranormal/Thrillers. Her p..."

Hello everyone!

Thanks so much for having me here, A.F. I apologize for my tardiness today. My internet connection is giving me problems, uggggg!


message 4: by A.F. (new)

A.F. (scribe77) | 1777 comments Mod
Barbiewatkins42 wrote: "A.F. wrote: "Please welcome author Barbara Watkins to our Q & A discussions. Barbara Watkins is an author from Southeast Missouri. Her main genre of interest is -but not limited to- Paranormal/Thr..."

Internet problems seem to be common lately.


message 5: by Barbara (new)

Barbara Watkins (barbarawatkins) | 19 comments D.d. wrote: "Hi Barbara!

Where do you get the ideas for your stories?

Do they start out as a scene that you can't get out of your head and you keep wondering 'What if'?

Or do you know how your book is going ..."


I find most of my ideas come from my own nightmares. I know - eerie, but true. I will usually get up in the middle of the night and quickly record a snippit of my dream to use later. I've also had several supernatural experiences happen from time to time in my life that I draw upon.

I play the scene in my head - much like a movie reel flashing from one scene to the next.


message 6: by A.F. (new)

A.F. (scribe77) | 1777 comments Mod
You've written some novellas and short stories and now a full-length novel. Do you find writing shorter works easier or harder than writing longer pieces?


message 7: by Barbara (new)

Barbara Watkins (barbarawatkins) | 19 comments A.F. wrote: "You've written some novellas and short stories and now a full-length novel. Do you find writing shorter works easier or harder than writing longer pieces?"

I personally find writing a long piece more difficult. In writing, Holowing Screams, I created several colorful characters and with the timeline set in 1971, I had to be careful when describing what they were wearing, driving, and even the dialogue I used. I was constantly making notes.


message 8: by Sheila (new)

Sheila | 97 comments Barbiewatkins42 wrote: "D.d. wrote: "Hi Barbara!

Where do you get the ideas for your stories?

Do they start out as a scene that you can't get out of your head and you keep wondering 'What if'?

Or do you know how your b..."
I've heard of people writing notes in the middle of the night, but I always imagine I'd never be able to get back to sleep if I tried. Can you sleep once you've written down the idea, or do you just keep writing?


message 9: by Barbara (new)

Barbara Watkins (barbarawatkins) | 19 comments I guess you could call me an insomniac. I seldom sleep over four to five hours a night - been this way for awhile now. The problem I find with not being able to sleep for any amount of time is, I tend to start several projects at the same time. I have four stories that I'm working on at any given time. I often find it difficult to decide which one I should put my all into - so to speak, lol.


message 10: by Marianne (new)

Marianne Wheelaghan (httpwwwgoodreadscomMarianneW) | 88 comments Hi Barbara, your books sound really interesting. What set you off on the rocky road to becoming a writer - was it something you've always wanted to do from when small, or was it a more recent thing?
Is there a new book coming out soon??


message 11: by Barbara (new)

Barbara Watkins (barbarawatkins) | 19 comments Marianne wrote: "Hi Barbara, your books sound really interesting. What set you off on the rocky road to becoming a writer - was it something you've always wanted to do from when small, or was it a more recent thing..."

I've always found writing to be relaxing - a form of stress release if you will, a place I can go to get away from my own worries. I'm not sure I've always wanted to be a writer but, I've always wanted to write, if that makes any sense. I've always loved storytelling. The act of creating these characters, putting them into conflicting situations, and then placing them in unfamiliar surroundings is quite invigorating, to say the least.

I'm working on several projects at the moment. I'm working on a sequel to 'Hollowing Screams,' 'Behind the Red Door,' and am developing a project with Dimi Nakov, a screenwriter and director from NewZealand.


message 12: by Marianne (new)

Marianne Wheelaghan (httpwwwgoodreadscomMarianneW) | 88 comments Barbiewatkins42 wrote: "Marianne wrote: "Hi Barbara, your books sound really interesting. What set you off on the rocky road to becoming a writer - was it something you've always wanted to do from when small, or was it a ..."

Thanks for answer. For me I think for me storytelling is also the driving force behind the writing. Good luck with all your projects - you are so creative!


message 13: by Barbara (new)

Barbara Watkins (barbarawatkins) | 19 comments Thank you for the kind comment and your support, Marianna! I thank everyone for the wonderful questions and for the opportunity to meet all of you.

Barbara


message 14: by Sheila (new)

Sheila | 97 comments Barbiewatkins42 wrote: "I guess you could call me an insomniac. I seldom sleep over four to five hours a night - been this way for awhile now. The problem I find with not being able to sleep for any amount of time is, I t..."
Not sure I could function without sleep, but I can relate to working on several stories at cone. Thanks for this Q&A


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