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Did you have script &/or cast approval?

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message 1: by Chrystal (new)

Chrystal | 2 comments Did you have script and/or cast approval for the movie?


message 2: by Lisa (new)

Lisa See | 81 comments Mod
Nope!


message 3: by Erin (new)

Erin (redhotrankin) | 3 comments As an avid reader, I cannot remember the last time a book had so much affect on me. I have yet to pick up another novel and it's been over a month. I have shared "Snowflower" with anyone who would listen to me. So much so, that seven of my friends, to-date, have actually read the book and were so completely moved, as I had been, that we met last night to book talk and watch the movie. We had a countdown to "Snowflower Chick Flick night".

Your story, your characters, the poetry of the relationships...I cannot begin to describe to you how it moved me. There were nights in bed that I woke my husband from crying, other nights, I crawled into bed with our sleeping 5 and 7 year old daughters to just hold them all the while thinking that they were the same ages and Lily and Beautiful Moon. I feel that I understand the current Chinese culture better with their present day attitudes towards baby girls. You have done so much with one story... thank you for writing a book that I will continue to share with others and, eventually, my daughters and that will resonate with me for a lifetime.

My question (maybe a plea)is that if you are to have any other of your books made into film, to please have a contract choice for script approval. Is that possible? Words cannot possibly express how bitterly disappointed my friends and I were last night after having watched the movie. We're not even sure it should have the same title as the book, we were that speechless. Going from a critically acclaimed book on best seller lists for weeks, to being made into a movie where the entire original story is less than half of the movie is so offensive to your readers it's left us grief stricken, seriously. To watch the DVD extras where Wayne Wang stated that had the movie been made from its original storyline, that he wouldn't have been "interested" made my friends in my family room roar with insult. The irony of it all??? It's a story about women, for women, to teach women and all of the women in charge of the movie let a man come in and destroy it based on his opinion, his thoughts, his wants??? Talk about Chinese history repeating itself.

Please Lisa. Tell us that any other book you have adapted to film, that you have script approval???


message 4: by Lisa (new)

Lisa See | 81 comments Mod
Erin wrote: "As an avid reader, I cannot remember the last time a book had so much affect on me. I have yet to pick up another novel and it's been over a month. I have shared "Snowflower" with anyone who would ..."

I hear you and I feel you, believe me. And Wayne's attitude about the original materail is a bit hard to fathom. That said, it's extremely hard to get script approval. You should know that I told them exactly what I thought every step of the way. Obviously they didn't listen to me.

What you have written is so powerful that I'm going to send it to Wayne. I'm curious what he would say.

Tomorrow I meet with the people who are making Peony in Love. I feel that I learned a lot from the Snow Flower experience and I will carry that with me in all future adaptations of my books --whether it's for fim or opera or whatever.


message 5: by Lisa (new)

Lisa See | 81 comments Mod
Gmjohnson wrote: "Lisa, How would you change the movie if you could?"

I don't see any point in thinking about how to change things when they can't be changed. Maybe that sounds fatalistic, but I also think that it's the only way to stay calm and centered. We can't change the past. We can only think about the future. And a film is nothing in the great scheme of things. There are so many more important things to worry about. (I'm a huge worrier!)


message 6: by Erin (new)

Erin (redhotrankin) | 3 comments Lisa, I'm comforted by your response to my post. I would greatly appreciate if you would share with me Wayne's response, if he offers one. From his demeanor on the DVD extra segment, I'm left believing my feelings or comments will have little effect.

In the meantime, I would love to hear authors/books that have inspired you as "Snowflower" has to me.

Thanks for your participation in today's dialogue, it means the world to me!


message 7: by Anne (new)

Anne (annejp) | 1 comments It's interesting that you should mention an opera. My first thought after the movie was that maybe this just wasn't the right medium. An opera or play may offer a better connection to the story as well as a more in-tune (emotionally available) audience.

As I have been so moved by your writing and Snow Flower's story, I was left empty after watching the movie adaptation. I yearned for the emotion your words evoked in me but mostly for the characters. By frequently leaving their lives, their homes, their familial positions and their relationships, there was a disconnect with their story. The life of a Chinese woman in rural China a century past is enough of a challenge for a typical movie-goer to make it interesting.

I could go on but I have chosen to see the movie as something apart from the book. That being said, I LOVED hearing the women sing. Were you able to hear the tradition women's singing before you wrote? I would love to hear more about that experience and how you came upon it. Also, when the mother's grieved for their daughters the days before their weddings, I had trouble discerning sincerity of their tears or was it just a part of the ritual. Perhaps it's because there is more tenderness in my culture (we can afford to be) but could you explain that a bit for me?


message 8: by Shomeret (new)

Shomeret | 3 comments Peony in Love as an opera in the same format as Chinese opera would be very appropriate, I think.


message 9: by Lisa (new)

Lisa See | 81 comments Mod
Erin wrote: "Lisa, I'm comforted by your response to my post. I would greatly appreciate if you would share with me Wayne's response, if he offers one. From his demeanor on the DVD extra segment, I'm left belie..."

Erin,

I sent your note to Wayne, and wow! I got an interesting response from him. I'd love to share it with you, but I really don't feel comfortable doing it in a public way.

I really want to thank you. Your note really meant a lot to me personally and it helped to get some things out in the open with Wayne.


message 10: by Lisa (new)

Lisa See | 81 comments Mod
Shomeret wrote: "Peony in Love as an opera in the same format as Chinese opera would be very appropriate, I think."

Do you mean as a novel or as an actual opera? I first envisioned the story as an opera.


message 11: by Erin (new)

Erin (redhotrankin) | 3 comments Lisa, my eMail address is erinrankin@yahoo.com. I can't tell you how anxious I am to read Wayne's response!

I want to say so much more, but want to offer my eMail address to you asap! Thank you Lisa!!!


message 12: by Shomeret (new)

Shomeret | 3 comments Lisa wrote: "Shomeret wrote: "Peony in Love as an opera in the same format as Chinese opera would be very appropriate, I think."

Do you mean as a novel or as an actual opera? I first envisioned the story as..."


I meant Peony in Love, the novel, adapted as an opera in the Chinese style.


message 13: by Sharon/ LFrog1386 (last edited Nov 12, 2011 04:45PM) (new)

Sharon/ LFrog1386 (lfrog1386) | 32 comments So I finally saw the movie. I have a lot of mixed feelings about it. I have to admit that it was beautifully filmed, with lush, gorgeous colors during the historical scenes and a much more modern, sleek look for the scenes of Sophia and Nina. The music was also extremely moving and underscored the deep emotion exquisitely.

I also understand that this is Hollywood (even if it was filmed in China) and a movie needs to make money. But Wayne's excuse wasn't that it needed to make money but that he wasn't interested in doing strictly a period piece. I think it had more to do with trying to reach a modern audience and the powers that be didn't think that a full-length period piece would fly because it would all be in Shanghainese.

I watch a lot of foreign film, especially Asian film, and I truly do believe that they captured the feeling of a Chinese film well. I can understand how some Americans would find it a bit confusing but really, they used only two incredible actresses to film four roles to make it easier for Westerners to understand and even had them speak a lot of English and used English names. Gianna Jun and Li Bing Bing are both very famous in their native countries and both infused their roles with passion and fervor, which I think translates in any language.

Did I find myself as engaged as the novel? No, but then it's hard to gain that depth of feeling in 104 minutes versus 288 pages which translate to a week of reading. I lived and breathed Snow Flower and Lily during that time. I don't think the film will ever compare to the novel but I also think it's a relevant and beautiful film for anyone interested in Chinese culture and more importantly, friendships that bind for life.


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