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Feeling Nostalgic? The archives > Is there a food you refuse to give up no matter what the cost?

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message 1: by Sarah (new)

Sarah | 13815 comments And accompanying question, is there a food you know you should give up but you're dragging your heels?

I love love love salmon, but I feel guilty about eating a big old predator fish these days. I try to get it from the right sources, but I know I should be eating other fishies instead.

I love love love chocolate, but I'm willing to give up all the famous candy bars for fair trade organic dark. Then the question is: what about chocolate chips in a bakery cookie? Or hot chocolate at a coffee shop? Or dessert at a restaurant? Hmm...


message 2: by Phil (new)

Phil | 11617 comments Diet Coke.


message 3: by Sarah (new)

Sarah | 13815 comments Mmm cheese...


message 4: by Jammies (new)

Jammies Dark chocolate, cheese and Diet Coke.


message 5: by Koeeoaddi (new)

Koeeoaddi (koee) Jammies wrote: "Dark chocolate, cheese and Diet Coke." ...and coffee.


message 6: by Mary (new)

Mary (merrussell) Coffee and red wine


message 7: by Lobstergirl, el principe (new)

Lobstergirl | 24099 comments Mod
Is there a food you refuse to give up no matter what the cost?

Coffee. Although...I guess it would depend how high the cost went. If coffee went to $10/cup, I'd probably have to give it up. It's an interesting hypothetical, what my ceiling price would be. The cost of cigarettes keeps rising, yet it doesn't seem that a lot of poor people have given them up.

I could give up salmon and chocolate without suffering too much. I don't eat that much chocolate anymore.


message 8: by Suefly (new)

Suefly | 620 comments Coffee, white wine and spinach. I can't help it, I love fresh spinach.


message 9: by Lobstergirl, el principe (new)

Lobstergirl | 24099 comments Mod
I could give up spinach without looking back. There're so many other greens that can replace it.


message 10: by Suefly (new)

Suefly | 620 comments I don't eat very much, so when I find something I enjoy I tend to latch on to it. I hate fruit, but enjoy many veggies.

Odd insight into my dull life!


message 11: by Lobstergirl, el principe (new)

Lobstergirl | 24099 comments Mod
I hate fruit too.


message 12: by Mary (new)

Mary (merrussell) Suefly wrote: "Coffee, white wine and spinach. I can't help it, I love fresh spinach."

I love spinach too.


message 13: by ~Geektastic~ (new)

 ~Geektastic~ (atroskity) | 3207 comments Bacon. I tried turkey bacon, but it's just not the same.


message 14: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 3389 comments Fresh shrimp.


message 15: by FabulousRaye (new)

FabulousRaye Peanut butter, apples, cheese.


message 16: by Lobstergirl, el principe (new)

Lobstergirl | 24099 comments Mod
People, you are not being truthful. If these foods went up to $500 per serving, you would still refuse to give them up? We all have a number, for each food.


message 17: by ~Geektastic~ (new)

 ~Geektastic~ (atroskity) | 3207 comments Lobstergirl wrote: "People, you are not being truthful. If these foods went up to $500 per serving, you would still refuse to give them up? We all have a number, for each food."

Based on Pi's initial post, I thought the "cost" was more of a moral thing, not so much about money. But I don't think there is any food I would refuse to give up if the price went up really high. I've already given up my weekly Milano habit because I can't justify 15 cookies for almost $4 (I still get them, but much less frequently).


message 18: by Jammies (new)

Jammies I'm with Amber, I thought Sarah's question was about the moral cost.


message 19: by Sarah (new)

Sarah | 13815 comments That was my intent.


message 20: by Lobstergirl, el principe (new)

Lobstergirl | 24099 comments Mod
I haven't given up quinoa yet, even though poor Central American quinoa farmers have been priced out of their own product.


message 21: by Helena (new)

Helena | 1058 comments Cheese & beef. I don’t eat a whole lot of beef, but I couldn’t live without a burger every once in a while.

I’ve recently had to give up cheese. Sigh. I’m lactose intolerant now.


message 22: by Lobstergirl, el principe (new)

Lobstergirl | 24099 comments Mod
I don't really buy honey anymore because it's gotten so expensive. Then yesterday I saw this awful blog post:

producers are ultra filtering honey to hide that it comes from China–which also serves to hide possible illegal antibiotics.

More than three-fourths of the honey sold in U.S. grocery stores isn’t exactly what the bees produce, according to testing done exclusively for Food Safety News.

In the U.S., the Food and Drug Administration says that any product that’s been ultra-filtered and no longer contains pollen isn’t honey. However, the FDA isn’t checking honey sold here to see if it contains pollen.

Ultra filtering is a high-tech procedure where honey is heated, sometimes watered down and then forced at high pressure through extremely small filters to remove pollen, which is the only foolproof sign identifying the source of the honey. It is a spin-off of a technique refined by the Chinese, who have illegally dumped tons of their honey – some containing illegal antibiotics – on the U.S. market for years.

76 percent of samples bought at groceries had all the pollen removed, These were stores like TOP Food, Safeway, Giant Eagle, QFC, Kroger, Metro Market, Harris Teeter, A&P, Stop & Shop and King Soopers.

100 percent of the honey sampled from drugstores like Walgreens, Rite-Aid and CVS Pharmacy had no pollen.

77 percent of the honey sampled from big box stores like Costco, Sam’s Club, Walmart, Target and H-E-B had the pollen filtered out.

100 percent of the honey packaged in the small individual service portions from Smucker, McDonald’s and KFC had the pollen removed.

Bryant found that every one of the samples Food Safety News bought at farmers markets, co-ops and “natural” stores like PCC and Trader Joe’s had the full, anticipated, amount of pollen.


http://www.emptywheel.net/2011/11/14/...


message 23: by Margaret Novak (new)

Margaret Novak | 12 comments pasta


message 24: by Janice (new)

Janice (jamasc) hamburgers


message 25: by Lori (new)

Lori | 181 comments coffee, pepsi, rotisserie chicken, duck


message 26: by Sarah (last edited Nov 16, 2011 07:30AM) (new)

Sarah | 13815 comments Lobstergirl wrote: "Bryant found that every one of the samples Food Safety News bought at farmers markets, co-ops and “natural” stores like PCC and Trader Joe’s had the full, anticipated, amount of pollen."

Just goes to show that it often pays to buy the local and natural versions.
The funny thing is that honey is the only food that doesn't go bad. Why mess with it at all? The ONLY reason is to disguise the source.


message 27: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 3389 comments Damn. I've been buying honey at the grocery store when it's on sale, anticipating a rise in price. Treacherous times we live in. I'll be looking for locally-produced honey from now on.


message 28: by Youndyc (new)

Youndyc | 1255 comments pretty much everything, it seems. But mostly: Diet Coke, Cheez Its, and pizza. Oh, and candy.


message 29: by Cyril (new)

Cyril I love pizza and hamburgers, but I could give them up if I had to.


Angela~twistedmind~ (twistedmind) | 540 comments Diet Mountain Dew, fries and red meat.


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