Writing Historical Fiction discussion

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message 1: by Murdo (last edited Jul 13, 2011 11:32AM) (new)

Murdo Morrison I just joined the group. In my novel, Roses of Winter (available on Goodreads), set in World War 2 Scotland, I chose to place fictional characters in real historical locations and events. This was a challenge to say the least. While the characters were fictional, the backdrop had to reflect what was really happening at the time. I would love to discuss this and other topics related to writing historical fiction with this group.


message 2: by Carla, The Virtually-Real Modern Historical Mod (new)

Carla René (carlaren) | 84 comments Mod
Murdo wrote: "I just joined the group. In my novel, Roses of Winter (available on Goodreads), set in World War 2 Scotland, I chose to place fictional characters in real historical locations and events. This was ..."

Welcome to the group. I look forward to your participation.


message 3: by Valerie (new)

Valerie Lewis | 19 comments Hi Murdo,
I write historical set novels. The Celtic Fabler I researched for nearly 3 years mainly because it was set in 577AD there was so little information available.
I had all my charectors set out but I needed to keep the time line in place. It was hard work but a lot of fun.
Good luck with your writings.


message 4: by Murdo (new)

Murdo Morrison Thank you. I can relate to the time line issue. I chose to include a Dunkirk sequence in my book. To keep the fictional characters in synch with the real history I inserted a time line into the draft text while I was writing those chapters. There is another issue I was very concerned about. It basically relates to what is referred to as continuity in movies. I wanted to guard against plot irregularities that can creep in when you have a story that takes some time to write. I caught a few and corrected them. If you can find people who are willing to read your drafts it helps because the writer can get too involved in the process and miss things.


message 5: by Valerie (new)

Valerie Lewis | 19 comments I know what you mean. I nearly got out of sync when writing my last story because I got carried away with my thoughts but I realised in time what was happening.
I have a couple of friends in my writing group that love reading for me and I will give them one chapter at a time to get feed back. It is working well for me.


message 6: by Murdo (new)

Murdo Morrison Carla, Thank you for your warm welcome.


message 7: by Darrell (new)

Darrell Delamaide | 6 comments I've just published my historical thriller, The Grand Mirage, about Britain's efforts to thwart the Kaiser's plan to establish a land link from Berlin to the Persian Gulf with the building of the Baghdad Railway. I got the idea, oddly enough, from a history of Deutsche Bank, which I covered for years as a financial journalist. Deutsche was the major financier for the project and this history devoted a whole chapter to it. It was a great story full of intrigue and harking back to an exotic world now vanished in history. I tried to recreate that world in Mirage.


message 8: by Karen (new)

Karen Klink (karenklink) | 20 comments Hello there, I'm Karen. I've been writing a novel for a year now that takes place before and during the American Civil War. I am on the third draft--actually it's practically an entire rewrite of the novel from first person to omniscient, and I've had a devil of a time getting restarted. My husband and I began traveling around the Northwest in an RV and I haven't written in all that time (except for a few hours here and there). We often go for days or a week without internet connection, and I miss discussions with other writers.


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