Paranormal Romance & Urban Fantasy discussion

334 views
Paranormal Romance > What did Twilight have that other vampire romances didn’t?

Comments Showing 1-50 of 57 (57 new)    post a comment »
« previous 1

message 1: by Vidya (new)

Vidya (vidyasamson) | 82 comments Weren’t there vampire romances before Twilight? Why did Twilight stand out?

I’ve been reading reviews of a lot of paranormal romances on this site and some books sound like they have really interesting concepts and an interesting intricate world.

Wheras I read Twilight and found it so dull. Yes I understand some of the appeal, especially to teens. There’s the dangerous hero who could kill you at any moment but loves you enough to overcome that. I found that creepy but it obviously had something that appealed to girls.

There’s the ordinary heroine that lands the extraordinary man. we all get the appeal of that. It’s been done a lot in romance. Perhaps it was never done before in a paranormal?

So again, what made Twilight stand out from all other vampire and indeed all other paranormal romances? What did Stephanie Myers do differently? what did she speak to that made readers such adoring fans that bought millions of her books?

She did something right and I want to find out what because after reading the first twilight novel I’m still at a loss. I know there are more interesting PNRs than this out there.

This post is not meant to bash Twilight. I’ve read enough bashing in reviews of it. I genuinely want to know what elements in it made it a hit.


message 2: by Davina (last edited Jul 03, 2011 08:32PM) (new)

Davina D. | 103 comments What did Stephanie Myers do differently?

In my opinion, absolutely nothing. Pure luck is all its boiled down to. She was in the right place at the right time.

The publishing world needed a rival for the unprecedented claim Harry Potter had on the tween/teen market. Plus Potter is a boy hero. They needed a heroine to keep the scales balanced. Politics. At least that's my theory.

I tried to read the first book of the series and couldn't get into it. I grudgingly watched the films at the behest of my 12 yr old niece and enjoyed them well enough even though I don't care for the lead actress (or any of her love interests for that matter).


Terry (Ter05 TwiMoms/ MundieMoms) (ter05) | 608 comments I personally think it is something intangible that we will never understand. I say that because my family read it back in 2007. We had never heard of it. My then 14 year old granddaughter brought it home from the library and my son read it to screen it. He called me the next day and told me I should buy this book because he was sure I would like it. They live 3 hours from me so within the week both I and his family had all three books and had read them all. We totally fell in love with them and we are talking three generations, three female and one male. We all were on dial-up so were not on the internet to know about the movie and all the hype that ensued. But for some reason the story got to us and we re-read them, they bought to audios to listen to traveling to soccer tournaments. Why did this story affect us this way? I have no idea. My other daughter in law had not read a book since she got out of high school and was in her late thirties then. She saw the movie and decided to read the book(s). She could not put them down and now she is an avid reader. People can criticize Stephenie Meyer indefinitely and rip apart her writing and these books, but there is something there and maybe we aren't ever going to understand it. Maybe we shouldn't try.


Terry (Ter05 TwiMoms/ MundieMoms) (ter05) | 608 comments Davina, I respectfully disagree. It was not politics. My family had never heard of it when we read it in 2007. I have talked so many people since then into reading it who had no interest - to use the words of the lady in my doctor's office, "I had no idea," I left Twilight with her and two weeks later went back with New Moon to see if she wanted to read it and she told me she had already bought all the books and was half way through the last one. Far too many people read these books and loved them way before all the publicity to say it was hype or politics or promotion. Vampire Diaries came out ten years before Twilight and is similar but didn't do what Twilight did. There is something there and not everyone "gets it" but millions do.


message 5: by Davina (new)

Davina D. | 103 comments Terry, that's okay. We can agree to disagree. I'm not knocking the books or anyone who enjoys them. Personally, I'm not that into YA (haven't read the Harry Potter books and as of today have no plans to) and only attempted to read the Twilight books for the sake of my niece. Unfortunately they were a bit juvenile and too poorly written, imho, to pull me in so we reached a compromise instead. I'll watch the movies with her and she can tell me how well they did in comparison to the books.


Terry (Ter05 TwiMoms/ MundieMoms) (ter05) | 608 comments Oh, I'm not saying everyone should like them because that never happens. I just think there is something there within the story/writing or whatever it is that draws people in and continues to do so that is totally impossible to describe.


message 7: by Nanna -DD- (new)

Nanna -DD- for me it was the first books I read for pleasure. Hadn't read other books than those demanded in college. And the mix between something mystery of vampires and the possesive love just did it for me. It was the books that got me reading! But afterwards I've found other books like the Night Huntress series and the BDB that are now my fav. But the twilight books will always have a special place in my heart :P


Lisa - (Aussie Girl) | 407 comments My theory on Twilight is that it meant different things to different generations. For the teen audience it was written for, it tapped into the miracle of first love, the appeal of the forbidden love and the first stirrings of lust. For the Twilight mums (my generation) it was the memory of what it was like to be in love for the first time. It was such a sweet romance and had some beautiful,touching scenes, like the first meadow scene, which some may find cheesy, but appealed to a lot of true romantics. It certainly made reading popular again for a new generation and for older readers re-ignited their love of paranormal romance.


message 9: by Erika (last edited Jul 04, 2011 03:31AM) (new)

Erika (erikamiller) | 74 comments They don't Sparkle! sorry haha had to say it.


message 10: by Vidya (new)

Vidya (vidyasamson) | 82 comments Definitely the book had something. even with the hype, it wouldn’t have been a success if people hadn’t genuinely liked it.

As I said I think one of the things that appealed was the ordinary heroine combined with the very desirable dangerous hero who was always one step away from killing her because he was so tempted, yet his love was more powerful and he resisted the temptation.

That repelled me and creeped me out because it seemed to me to suggest that a lot of teen girls crave a guy who could hurt them. Perhaps not in real life but in fantasy?

The book seemed to me to be giving the message to teen girls that its fine to trust someone who warns you he might abuse you as long as he is hot.

Still, yes I get the point about the miracle of first love, the appeal of the forbidden love and the first stirrings of lust. it's a very clean romance.


message 11: by Lynne (new)

Lynne Connolly (lynneconnolly) | 7 comments Ah! Bulb lighting up in head.
Before Twilight, vampire books tended to have adult themes. Furthermore, the big initial surge was with the epublishers, on the Internet.
So the publishers of Twilight found a vampire book for teens that had some tropes that to the reader of vampire books were well-worn, even tired, and, (this is the light bulb) marketed to people not readily conversant with the Internet.
There are lots of them, and we who have regular access tend to overlook that. The author is a non extremist Mormon, so appeals to "good people" and could be seen as slightly naughty, but not that naughty.
Clever marketing.

Personally, I detested it because of the creepy stalker hero and the clueless, passive-aggressive heroine, and the clunky writing. But to people who hadn't come across Sherrilyn Kenyon, Anne Rice and JR Ward (who had by then broken through to the mainstream) or people who didn't want too much sexorring in their books, Twilight came as a revelation. It also has underlying Christian themes and a moral base people who might be doubtful of the other authors could feel safe with.


Terry (Ter05 TwiMoms/ MundieMoms) (ter05) | 608 comments Lisa wrote: "My theory on Twilight is that it meant different things to different generations. For the teen audience it was written for, it tapped into the miracle of first love, the appeal of the forbidden lo..."

I think you nailed it, Lisa.


message 13: by Schay (new)

Schay | 72 comments Erika wrote: "They don't Sparkle! sorry haha had to say it."

Lmao!
I remember reading that scene for the first time. My face was like O_O and then I just lol'd for so long after that. Seriously though, I think the sparkly factor has immortalised the Twilight saga (Haha, I made a punny!). No other author would dare to do this to their vampires xD


message 14: by [deleted user] (new)

I think it just got popular because of the movies really. Like it was popular like any teen vampire book was before the movies, but the reason it became major was purly because of the movies in my opinion


message 15: by Sylvie (new)

Sylvie (sweets1103) I also agree with Lisa. For me who is in the older (but not old - lol) generation (early 30's) it triggers the feelings of euphoria of the first crush/first love. And who doesn't want to feel that again right?

I also think the movies helped a lot, even if the books were hugely popular before the movies it kind of helped sky rocket them into everyone's bookshelves.


Terry (Ter05 TwiMoms/ MundieMoms) (ter05) | 608 comments It is inaccurate to say it was popular only like any teen vampire book before the movies. The first movie was released at the end of 2008 (November)

From Wiki: "Twilight was published in 2005 with a print run of 75,000 copies. It debuted at #5 on the New York Times Best Seller list within a month of its release, and later peaked at #1. Foreign rights to the novel were sold to over 26 countries.

In October 2008, Twilight was ranked #26 in USA Today's list of "Bestselling Books of Last 15 Years". Later, the book went on to become the best-selling book of 2008.


message 17: by Pat aka Tygyr (new)

Pat aka Tygyr (tygyr) | 69 comments I started reading the Twilight series to screen them before allowing my 9 yr old granddaughter to read them (she had finished Harry Potter and was looking for another series to read). She's an avid reader like me. So as I finished the books I gave them to her. We both devoured the books, getting very little sleep. We both have also reread them numerous times. For me I'm not sure why I am such a fan, I just know I couldn't put the books down. When we finished the Twilight series we started on other PNR series. My granddaughter has moved onto other fiction, but I am still craving my PNR.


message 18: by Kelleigh (new)

Kelleigh (goodreadscomsunshine2047) I will always love the Twilight saga, simply because it rekindled my love for reading.

I think that, like a lot of other people, Twilight was the first paranormal romance I have ever read. It was something new - dark, forbidden, with a wonderful love triangle to boot. It was new and exciting and we just gobbled it up.

For me, it was the elemtent of finding my reading passion again, mingled with a new book concept ( vampires, warewolves, etc...) along with a great story line that did it for me. I love this series, as well has her Host Novel...

I think Twilight will always hold a special place in my heart.

:)


message 19: by Lauren (last edited Jul 04, 2011 01:01PM) (new)

Lauren (laurenjberman) There is something about Twilight and the Harry Potter books that appeals to people on a fundamental level. For Harry Potter it is universal themes of friendship, courage, the struggle between good and evil, etc. and in Twilight it is the idea that two people are meant for each other, or conflict between mythological creatures which have been cultural icons for centuries.

I don't believe that it is merely the hype and the merchandising (even though this probably helps) because both series were popular with readers before all of the commercialization (the first HP movie only came out around the time of the 4th book, for example).

I also think that both authors are skillful writers who put a lot of detail into their worlds. This may be why these books succeeded where others failed. Ursula Le Guin, for instance, had a school for wizards long before HP, but her writing did not "speak" to the younger generation or to a wider audience while Rowling's did.


message 20: by Davina (last edited Jul 05, 2011 05:45PM) (new)

Davina D. | 103 comments Terry (Ter05 TwiMoms/ MundieMoms) wrote: "It is inaccurate to say it was popular only like any teen vampire book before the movies. The first movie was released at the end of 2008 (November)

From Wiki: "Twilight was published in 2005..."


Terry, the book having been published in 05, and the first movie coming out in 08 sounds pretty film industry standard to me. It actually means the rights to the books were probably sold at or just after publication since three years is more or less the norm for developing a film project from concept to it been on the screen in theatres. Of course, some projects may take less time, others may they take more time, but on average 3 years, especially when it comes to adaptations, is pretty normal.


As for why Twilight appeals ... I actually can relate to the idea that its because of the all consuming feeling of first love that the novel reminds us (the older generation) off. For me, even though I hated the writing, it certainly helped that the book was a romance, and that the story paralleled my own life somewhat. I met and fell in love with the hubs when we both were in high school. So thinking back to days when I'd get butterflies in my stomach and my knees would turn to putty ... yeah those were good times and I wanted to like the book for that reason. Unfortunately it didn't work out because of the poor writing.

Nevertheless, I still think Meyer's success is mostly due to luck for as the OP pointed out other more talented authors have done it and done it better. I don't buy the argument that these authors weren't able to connect with younger readers. I recently read an article in the NY Times that said, according to publishing figures, Vampire Diaries is at least as popular as Twilight, but of course with the exception that it wasn't subjected to the wide levels of commercialization as Twilight was.

I also do believe that the Harry Potter books helped to drive Twilight's popularity. Publishers saw the smash hit that was Harry Potter and sought to court a segment of the market they'd largely underestimated with additional tween/teen merchandise.

Furthermore, Harry Potter was successful before the movies, yes, but it was the movies that propel the books and JK Rowlings into an international phenomena.


message 21: by Jethi (new)

Jethi (gothixxxa) Sparklie Vampires.
Bella is ALWAYS saved by Edward.
Bella's whole life revolves around Edward.(get a life)
Edward's perfection is described too many times.(We get it.He's hot!)
Unlike other characters...he's flaw-less..
Mr. Sparkles watches Bella sleep?
And rather then screaming "STALKER"...She just says "Did you hear my sleeptalk?"
Well.... Splaklie Vampires.(That's just wrong.)
Victoria's head being ripped in front of Bella and she reacts "really" calmly..
He loves her because she smells good... Yummm.. now that's different!!!


message 22: by Kiersten (new)

Kiersten Fay (kierstenfay) | 293 comments I'm sure that Twilight will be analyzed for centuries to come. Why did it create such a mass phenomenon? I don’t believe it was the right-place-at-the-right-time sort of thing. Vampire stories are loved, no matter what decade.

Why was Twilight different? I believe it can be boiled down to nothing more than primitive instinct—Absolute, unmitigated, true, dare I say obsessive love. Putting aside that he is hot and she is “plain” and they are in high school. We as a species want to be loved, and want to love back, unconditionally. We want instant connection, to find our soul mate, and most of all passion. And there’s no denying that Twilight had passion.

Twilight speaks to our baser instincts.

This is why, like Jane Austen’s Pride and prejudice, Twilight will be mimicked for years to come.


Terry (Ter05 TwiMoms/ MundieMoms) (ter05) | 608 comments And criticized, Kiersten. That is just the way it is. If something is at the top, it will be dissected and ripped up, but what remains is still a book beloved by millions. People delight in saying that a book is not well written, but what is good writing? Isn't it something that draws the reader in, causes them to identify with both characters and story, and to want to re-read and share it with others? Technically how well written a story doesn't mean much if it does not do all these things.


message 24: by Roberta (new)

Roberta (roberta88) I completely agree with everyone!!

The guy breaks into her house and watches her sleep. And she is not freaked out by this. WTF????

In my opinion Twilight has nothing overly special about it and is really such a big hit because it has been made into a movie. Also the target audience of early teens and the HEA and everything works out for Bella and she gets her flawless BF...It all just makes my gag! She needs a life, a job, a personality of her own!


message 25: by Kiersten (new)

Kiersten Fay (kierstenfay) | 293 comments Terry (Ter05 TwiMoms/ MundieMoms) wrote: "If something is at the top, it will be dissected and ripped up, but what remains is still a book beloved by millions. People delight in saying that a book is not well written, but what is good writing? Isn't it something that draws the reader in, causes them to identify with both characters and story, and to want to re-read and share it with others?"

Very well said.


message 26: by Chris (new)

Chris Hackett | 8 comments Whatever it is that Stephanie Meyer did, I would like to know strictly on the grounds that I would like to do the same with my book lol. As long as it's not selling my soul to the Devil.


message 27: by Crazy4more (new)

Crazy4more (lan-ni) | 2906 comments Kelleigh wrote: "I will always love the Twilight saga, simply because it rekindled my love for reading.

I think that, like a lot of other people, Twilight was the first paranormal romance I have ever read. It w..."


I'm with Kelleigh, Twilight saga holds a special place in my heart. It introduced me to paranormal romance, rekindled my love for reading which lead me to GOODREADS where I met so many friends and adviced to other great reads. I'm unstoppable, esp after BDB, I never looked back.


message 28: by Davina (new)

Davina D. | 103 comments Terry (Ter05 TwiMoms/ MundieMoms) wrote: "People delight in saying that a book is not well written, but what is good writing? Isn't it something that draws the reader in, causes them to identify with both characters and story, and to want to re-read and share it with others? Technically how well written a story doesn't mean much if it does not do all these things."

The wide popularity of the books is due to a number of factors as outlined here by many. People are enthralled by the story of the all consuming, everlasting, fantastical love, certainly not Meyer's ability as a writer (just read the reviews). Therefore, many fans are perhaps willing to continue reading for the sake of the love story rather than any real talent the author has at retaining readership. Once the Twilight series ended, many people jumped shipped. Just look at how Meyer's The Host has done. To my knowledge, The Host has been able to achieved only modest sales. The underwhelming results would have been quite an achievement for an average, small time writer, but for a big timer like Meyers, it's telling. When you don't have a compelling story, your skill as writer can save you and vice versa. When you have neither, you'll sink.


Terry (Ter05 TwiMoms/ MundieMoms) (ter05) | 608 comments I agree that you must have a compelling story. The Host simply isn't a good story. Nothing about it appealed to me - the concept of aliens implanted in the back of your neck taking over your brain - Pretty creepy. It appealed to some but the overall concept isn't one that is going to have a huge appeal to everyone. Good writers do write poor books and vice versa.


message 30: by Erika (new)

Erika (erikamiller) | 74 comments Schay wrote: "Erika wrote: "They don't Sparkle! sorry haha had to say it."

Lmao!
I remember reading that scene for the first time. My face was like O_O and then I just lol'd for so long after that. Seriousl..."


haha i agree :)


message 31: by Duchess Nicole (new)

Duchess Nicole | 138 comments Crazy4more wrote: "Kelleigh wrote: "I will always love the Twilight saga, simply because it rekindled my love for reading.

I think that, like a lot of other people, Twilight was the first paranormal romance I hav..."


I could copy your post word for word. I loved reading when I was younger, and after having kids and being a grown up, it seemed I didn't have time any more. One of my friend gave me the whole Twilight series and said 'read them.' I ignored life for a week, and reread the series again when I finished. It reminded me how much I love fiction, introduced me to the paranormal genre, and made me realize how much I need to read. I think it will always be one of my favorite series now, regardless whether I've read books that I've liked better since then. I can't imagine what I would do without my bookshelves/nook/library. What a boring life, to never have the fantasy that comes with reading!


message 32: by La La (new)

La La | 245 comments I'm going to be honest, I only read the books because of the movie. I live in the city and I'm going to tell you the book didn't start featuring prominently on the train until word leaked out that a movie of the same name was coming out, kind of like "The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo" is popular on the train now. Was the book good, yes. But to me, it was just good not great, In a nutshell the book was simplistic. There were no huge revalations and the langauage was easy to digest. It was written for young adults and when writing for them you don't want to bog them down with too much info. Just let them know the girl is ordinary and pretty poor and the guy is hot and rich *High School Musical*anyone and you have a hit on your hand. That formula, no matter what the genre, is going to work. As I read the book did I see Edward as a dangerous hero, no. He drinks animal blood and he's a virgin. Bella was only tempting to him because her blood had a special scent. He never had a hunger problem with other mortals.

Why the series holds a special place in my heart? It got me reading again after 10 yrs of not reading. Since then I've gotten back to reading the regular romances I use to read and discovered a whole new world in PNR and UF. Is the series a reread for me, no. By book three I was kind of tired of both Bella and Edward. By book 4 I started skipping a lot of pages trying to get to the point. If I had never read the book and decided to do so now after reading all the other PNR and UF books I've read in the last 3 year would I? Probably not. I'm not really much for YA and this book would probably come across as a little too young for me, but I am happy I gave it a chance when I did.


message 33: by Heather (new)

Heather (sparkleyturtle) | 151 comments Terry (Ter05 TwiMoms/ MundieMoms) wrote: "I agree that you must have a compelling story. The Host simply isn't a good story. Nothing about it appealed to me - the concept of aliens implanted in the back of your neck taking over your brai..."


Meanwhile, I loved the Host. I loved how relaxed and slow it was when the aliens were just being aliens and how the world got all turned around when she was with the humans. I liked the characters and enjoyed the story.


message 34: by Todd (last edited Jul 06, 2011 05:47PM) (new)

Todd (nerdytodd) Vidya wrote: "Weren’t there vampire romances before Twilight? Why did Twilight stand out?...
I’ve been reading reviews of a lot of paranormal romances on this site and some books sound like they have really inte..."


Taja Replied:
I think one of the big reasons that The Twilight Saga stood out was that you aren't just reading about a girl who falls in love. It is written from first-person perspective, so you are Bella. When I read Twilight, I actually fell in LOVE with Edward Cullen. I dreamt about him, I thought about him when I wasn't reading, and I longed to pickup the books and read & read... when I finished the fourth book, I felt a loss. I was actually in a sort-of depression because I was no longer a part of the story I had become obsessed with. I picked up book-1 and re-read them just to fill that void.

All of this I did... after making fun of the Twilight franchise, and laughing at the fool-girls who did this before me...

I have to say though, that I am not a huge fan of the movies. Though the movies are fine... they are NOTHING in comparison to the books. The movies were bred like pop-cinema and marketed to young teens who would think Robert Pattinson (Edward) or Taylor Lautner(Jacob) were "cute"... and they induced a teen-idol TwiMania obsession out of the saga that could make anyone puke... The books are NOT to be compared, in my opinion.

When I first picked up the books it was because my mother, and my father (divorced since 1983) had independently read the four books and had insisted that I partake. My father read them and was entranced for whole other reasons, saying that the story was "just awesome". My mother had fallen in love and tried to convince me that the books were NOT just for teens.

I read about the process, in the words of Stephenie Meyer, who said that she had a dream that spawned the whole story. She became obsessed with the Edward Cullen character almost immediately and actually fell in love with him as she began to write him into her books. She actually cried and went into her own depression when she realized that Edward had to leave in New Moon. She says that her love for the characters and her obsession with the story is what drove her to write these books. These were the first novels of her career.

I believe that the author's love & obsession leaked onto the pages for us all to soak in. I really feel like, because she was actually in love with Edward, we all got that sense of longing & obsession that we normally would only feel when we are in the first bounds of love, when love is the obsession, the butterflies, the dreams, and daydreams that keep you obsessing about that person...

Of the agegroups, when I speak to elderly women, or middle aged women, they say that the books remind them of their first loves. Women my age (late 20s, early 30s) agree that it reminds them of when they first met their husband, or their first loves. I have not actually met any teen girls who have actually read the books. But I have met several teen girls who agree that they love the movies.

When I compare these books to others that I liked, it was the emotion and the personal feelings that I had, that seperate these books from others. When I read the House of Night books by P.C. Cast I was entertained, but not in love. When I read the Hunger Games Trilogy by Suzanne Collins, I was obsessed, but not in love. When I read the Fallen Series byLauren Kate, I felt obsessed with the love story and am totally excited to buy and read book 4 instantly when it comes out,... but again, not in love. Though I understand the reason for falling in love with a character like Daniel Grigori in Fallen... I wasn't actually in love with him, myself.

And to me,... that is what seperates the Twilight Saga from the rest. It is why Twilight stood out, and is a part of me. Because it was a part of my past emotions, Edward Cullen is a member of my past-loves... It wasn't just a good story, or a good book like the rest.

And I have to add... Though Twilight & New Moon were good, You must get to the best of the series, and read book 3 Eclipse♥ to really understand how awesome the series can be, in my opinion.


message 35: by Missyb (new)

Missyb | 493 comments I think Twilight benefited from being marketed down our throats. It appealed to the younger audience and hooked them at a time that they didn't relly have that. It made vampires mainstream. It wasn't the best of books, the writting wasn't that great and had too much filler, but stuff like that may be overlooked by a younger audience then adults. I really enjoyed Breaking Dawn, and felt the writting did get better as the series went on.


message 36: by Missyb (new)

Missyb | 493 comments Davina wrote: "Terry, that's okay. We can agree to disagree. I'm not knocking the books or anyone who enjoys them. Personally, I'm not that into YA (haven't read the Harry Potter books and as of today have no pla..."

Good point on counteracting (or giving an alternate craze) the Harry Potter craze, it did give the girls something to swoon over.


message 37: by Vidya (new)

Vidya (vidyasamson) | 82 comments Thanks for your input, everyone. Lots of great responses and good points in this thread.

I’ve read teen girls moan that there are no boys like Edward in real life. check this out:

http://community.feministing.com/2011...

what do girls want that they find only in Edward? What attracts them to only him and not a dozen other fictional heroes? Romances are anyway packed with alpha males and men you can’t find in real life. what makes Edward different?

I had a thought. I haven’t heard it mentioned anywhere. Do you think they like that Edward is the one who insists on preserving Bella’s virginity since in real life teen boys are way too eager to get into girls’ pants? Perhaps this makes him seem safe to girls despite the other dangerous things about him.


message 38: by Melissa (new)

Melissa (havily_fray) | 13 comments I wonder why when I think about Edward breaking into Bella's bedroom to watch her sleep I think "awe". But when I think of my ex doing the same thing, I'm out for blood! And freaked out! It really is creepy and NOT romantic. Come to think of it, some guy being really possessive of me at that age, acting like that would have been dumped FAST. Yet somehow, Stephanie Meyers pulls it off! That's what I like about the whole PR genre though, most of what happens I wouldn't allow in real life, but in a book, it's all good!


message 39: by Todd (new)

Todd (nerdytodd) Melissa wrote: "I wonder why when I think about Edward breaking into Bella's bedroom to watch her sleep I think "awe". But when I think of my ex doing the same thing, I'm out for blood! And freaked out! ..."

OMG I loved your point :) !!!

That's whats good about a lot of these types of books. If I wanted to read reality, I would be in the groups for Non-Fiction, or Reality-Fiction, Historical-Fiction.... I love Fantasy & paranormal because it is about living outside yourself. It allows you to "allow" things that you would never allow otherwise.

If a guy began sparkling in front of me -on any day- I would start laughing at him like he was wearing glitter... if his skin was refracting light I might just totally freak out. If I found out vampires actually existed, I would have a complete-breakdown of my reality and sanity. If a guy I liked EVER broke into my house, was cold to the touch, could smell me <-- which is super gross.., or could do any of the things Edward does with Bella, it would be NOT OK.

But..... when I read about these things, I am totally like "awe" and getting teary because it is soo sweet! lol. I guess I accept sooo much more with my books because I know the whole thing is outside of reality anyway. ☺

With Twilight, its just written in a way that, I mean, Edward could do almost ANY things-that-other-boys-get-dumped-for-because-its-too-creepy and we will all just swoon... ♥


message 40: by Kiersten (new)

Kiersten Fay (kierstenfay) | 293 comments Taja wrote: "If I wanted to read reality, I would be in the groups for Non-Fiction, or Reality-Fiction, Historical-Fiction.... I love Fantasy & paranormal because it is about living outside yourself."

That's a really good point. And I agree with Melisa too. There is an obvious difference between fantasy and reality.

Stalker in real life=Call the cops.
Stalker in a romance book=Swoon.


message 41: by jD (new)

jD (jd_4everbooked) | 152 comments Lisa wrote: "My theory on Twilight is that it meant different things to different generations. For the teen audience it was written for, it tapped into the miracle of first love, the appeal of the forbidden lo..."

Lisa I am of the same frame of mind. Bella reminded me of why I would never be a teenager again. She also helped me appreciate my shy friends by reminding me that still waters run deep. The reason I picked it up at first was because Meyers is Mormon and I wanted to see what she would do with paranormal subject matter. She delivered a beautiful love story.


message 42: by Dee (new)

Dee (austhokie) I think that Twilight happened to just hit at a time when readers were looking for that something (however you want to define it) and Twilight presented it to them. I would argue with the same with the Steig Larsson series - IMHO, it hit at a time when readers were looking for something a bit darker than the standard US mystery fare (a la James Patterson and others like him) and the Millenium series did that...they were good, but i've read much better


message 43: by Cee (new)

Cee | 82 comments Twilight just had the marketing. There really is nothing special about the books.


message 44: by C.C. (new)

C.C. | 219 comments That's easy! SPARKLING VAMPIRES:)))
Oh and Edward ofcourse


message 45: by Mairéad (new)

Mairéad | 5 comments Celine wrote: "Twilight just had the marketing. There really is nothing special about the books."

True!!


message 46: by Kimi (new)

Kimi (kimisokool) | 60 comments Edward! You just can't duplicate Edward Cullens. He's amazing and unique in so many ways! =)


message 47: by ஐ Briansgirl (Book Queen)ஐ (last edited Jul 16, 2011 11:15AM) (new)

ஐ Briansgirl (Book Queen)ஐ (briansgirlkate) In my humble opinion, there is only one thing that made Twilight stand out from other previous vampire books (to start a trend), and that is... she geared it to a YA audience. After Harry Potter, they were looking for something else to read, perhaps with more romance in it, and they embraced the vampires, werewolves and Bella's struggle. It hit the right audience at the right time. Once Twilight became so popular, so it seems did other vampire and paranormal books. It's not that they weren't out there before, just not so mainstream. I mean, come on, even Harlequin put out a Nocture line of books to peddle vampires and werewolve romances.


message 48: by Cee (new)

Cee | 82 comments Thank you Mairead, not many people agree with me (;

That's probably very true Briansgirl. They were looking for the next best thing after Harry Potter, and Twilight just fit the bill.

I've read Twilight, and I thought they were al right. Not bad, not good either. I don't understand why so much girls are squee-ing their buts off for Edward. He is like the archetype of how a relationship SHOULDN'T be. Your boyfriend shouldn't climb through your window without your knowledge. He doesn't make Bella laugh. They don't have fun. Then, he leaves her to be a pathetic puddle of misery. Comes back saying "oopsie, I didn't know you cared that much".

I'm sorry, I don't despise the Twilight books, but I do have a personal grudge against Edward.


message 49: by Mairéad (new)

Mairéad | 5 comments Celine wrote: "Thank you Mairead, not many people agree with me (;

That's probably very true Briansgirl. They were looking for the next best thing after Harry Potter, and Twilight just fit the bill.

I've read T..."


No problemo! (:


Samantha (Book Lover's Cozy Cafe) (sparklyblueyes) | 1718 comments Twilight had the feel of innocence but not unrealistic innocence.


« previous 1
back to top