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message 1: by Sherry (new)

Sherry (directorsherry) | 18 comments This is where I begin to post my plays. I finally figured it out! I am discussion topic impaired. So here goes.


message 2: by Sherry (new)

Sherry (directorsherry) | 18 comments This is a 10 minute play I wrote a couple of years ago. I'll put it out there to see how it flies.

DIME STORE BABY

It is 1964. A very tiny two bedroom apartment above a small five and dime store. The front door opens to exterior wooden stairs out to the street two floors below. The living room is tiny and has only a fold out couch and a chair, thrift store variety. The second room is a kitchen and a bedroom. A large double bed is up against the wall and a small pullman kitchen with stove refrigerator and sink are on the stage right wall. A door to the only bathroom is downstage right. There is only one window in the front room. It is night. Seventeen year old JENNIFER BLAKELY studies on thefold out couch in the front room. Her mother ENID cleans up the dinner dishes in the kitchen. There is a knock at the door. And then another louder knock. Jennifer looks at the door.
JENNIFER
Mom, Mom. There’s someone at the door.
The knock again. Enid goes to the door.
ENID
Who in the world?
She goes to the front door. Jennifer is close behind.
ENID (CONT'D)
(at the door)
Who is it?
TAD
Tad...Houston
Enid freezes in her tracks
ENID
(As if hearing a ghost)
Who?
TAD
Enid, It’s me Tad.
JENNIFER
You know this guy?
ENID
(to Tad)
What are you doing here?
TAD
I want to see you...and the baby.
JENNIFER
Is he talking about me?
ENID
(opens the door, to Tad)
The baby is a girl, her name is Jennifer.
Enid walks away from the door and leaves Jennifer stunned, staring at Tad. Tad is a handsome man in his late forties to early 50s. He’s dressed in a suit. He is obviously well to do.
TAD
Hi Jennifer.
ENID
This is your Dad. Tad Houston. Not that he deserves that title. Why are you here? It’s been what? Seventeen years?
TAD
I guess we lost touch.
ENID
I’m exactly where you left me. Above Granger’s five and dime. I didn’t lose touch. I thought we had a deal, one you made me agree to, as I recall. So I really don’t know why you’re here.
JENNIFER
What about Dad?
TAD
Blakely?
ENID
He was a man who stuck around long enough to give you a name and make it so I could walk down the street with my head up.
JENNIFER
That wasn’t very long was it? I hardly remember him before he went wherever he went.
ENID
We’re doing alright. You’re going to college next year, thanks to nobody but us.
(to Tad)
So why are you here? Really.
TAD
Because it’s about time. And...I just needed to clear something up.
ENID
What’s that?
He shows her a newspaper.
ENID (CONT'D)
Congratulations.
TAD
I’m running for office. Can we sit? I just need to talk for a few minutes.
JENNIFER
You want some coffee?
(she looks at her Mom, her Mom shrugs)
I’ll fix some.
Jennifer heads into the kitchen to put on the coffee. Tad follows her, and Enid does too.
TAD
You seem to be a nice young lady.
JENNIFER
I guess. Do you care?
TAD
Sure.
JENNIFER
Do I have brothers and sisters?
TAD
Three. Two brothers and a sister. All older than you.
JENNIFER
Do they know about me?
TAD
No.
ENID
That was part of the deal.
JENNIFER
The deal.
ENID
That I would never interfere in his life, if he let you live.
TAD
Enid, don’t say it like that.
ENID
How should I say it? It’s what happened.
TAD
I couldn’t leave my marriage. You knew that. I just wanted to save your reputation.
ENID
And yours. Don’t forget about that? I’m sure you haven’t. No doubt, that’s why you are here.
(to Jennifer)
Jennifer, I wanted to have you. He wanted to send me to France to have an abortion. I just couldn’t do it. I wanted a baby and I thought I could manage okay. So I had to agree to never tell you or anyone about your life. I met Mr. Blakely soon after. And we got married. It was just after the war. Everybody was married. You just couldn’t not be married. He was pretty much of a drifter. He had a good heart. He married me to make things better for you and me. He was never able stay in one place very long.
TAD
You could have chosen adoption.
ENID
I did not want to do that. And, if you’ll recall, that wasn’t an option for you either at the time. You were afraid your father would find out about this and cut you off.
JENNIFER
Great so I finally meet my real father and I find out he didn’t even want me to exist.
TAD
Nothing personal, really. You didn’t exist at that time.
JENNIFER
Okay, so nice to meet you. When are you leaving?
TAD
I have a favor and I think you’ll like it because it could mean you could leave this creepy apartment above the dime store.
ENID
I really don’t mind it. It’s home to me. It’s close to work. Just walk downstairs.
JENNIFER
I don’t either, it’s close to school. Just walk down the street.
TAD
Well, here’s what I have in mind. I need you to not know me. I don’t want any scandal, because I’m running for office. So I’ll make it worth your while to do this, and since you are my daughter it will help out with school, or whatever you need. It’s a check signed by my accountant.
ENID
(keeping her emotion under wraps.)
I don’t want your money. I’ve done just fine without you. I put food on the table and clothes on our backs. We have never had to take charity, I’m not going to start now. Don’t worry, I have no interest in even being associated with you. As far as I’m concerned, you don’t exist.
JENNIFER
Let me see the check.
(He hands it to her)
This is a lot of money, Mom.
ENID
I don’t care.
JENNIFER
Mom...
(to Tad)
Will you excuse us for a moment?
She pulls her Mom into the front room.
JENNIFER (CONT'D)
Mom, let’s take it. Come on. You don’t really like it at the dime store and you know it. You complain all the time. It would be nice for a change to not have to dig nickels and dimes out of the couch just to buy school supplies.
ENID
He’s just so arrogant.
JENNIFER
Mom, he‘s a stranger. He might as well be Mr. Anthony at our door with a check for a million dollars. I don’t know him and I don’t care to know him. He’s obviously not worth knowing. But if he wants to atone for his sins by giving us money. Let’s take it.
ENID
Jennifer, I’m sorry, I was so stupid.
JENNIFER
Did you love him, Mom?
ENID
Who knows. I thought I did. He was just so handsome, and he never told me about his family until it was too late.
JENNIFER
(hugs her Mom)
Well, I love you and I’ll be okay. I really will. I’ve got you and Granny and Grandpa. And everybody thinks my no good father went off and left us. So, who cares, right?
Jennifer crosses to the kitchen.
JENNIFER (CONT'D)
We’ll take your check.
TAD
Good -- And you’ll go on as if I don’t exist.
JENNIFER
No problem. As far as I’m concerned, you’re Mr. Anthony.
TAD
(he looks at her perplexed)
Oh, right the millionaire guy on television.
Tad walks to the door.
TAD (CONT'D)
(to Enid)
She’s a good kid. You did a great job.
(to Jennifer)
See ya, Dime store Baby. Have a nice life.
He leaves.
JENNIFER
Dime store Baby!
ENID
That’s what he used to call you. His dime store Baby.
JENNIFER
Did you live here when he met you?
ENID
No, but I worked in the store. It’s where he met me. He came in for a limeade and a pimento cheese sandwich. He was passing through.
JENNIFER
Are you sorry things turned out like they did?
ENID
I’m sorry I fell in love with a liar, but I’m not sorry about you.
(She pauses for a moment and looks at Jennifer)
You’re taking this well. Are you alright?
JENNIFER
Yeah, Mom... In some wierd way it’s kind of neat. I find out this rich important, uh, what’s the word, scum-bag is my real father. It has no real meaning for me. The only father that has meaning for me was a man named Blakely who left. And my Mother is someone who has always been here.
ENID
(hugs her)
I don’t know what I did to deserve you, my dime store baby.
You have been the best thing that ever happened to me.
JENNIFER
And now look what happened, this non existent scum-bag father is willing to pay a lot of money to me to keep quiet about something I wouldn’t give a plug nickle to mention. Not bad, huh?
ENID
Wow, I guess not. It’s just not bad at all.
THE END


message 3: by Sherry (new)

Sherry (directorsherry) | 18 comments Thanks so much for your comments. It's interesting, stage directions (referring to your first paragraph note,)as a rule are not supposed to be too wordy, just enough to give the picture. However, if it's confusing then I need to re-write it.


message 4: by Sherry (new)

Sherry (directorsherry) | 18 comments Okay, thanks. I'm also going to look up Scum-bag. Thanks for your comments. Much appreciated.


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