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Lost Summer of Louisa May Alcott > Question 4: Writing vs. Independence

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message 1: by Ashley (new)

Ashley | 384 comments Mod
Was Louisa May’s conflict more about writing or independence? Or, was it something else?


message 2: by Carol (new)

Carol (cajonesdoa) | 640 comments Mod
Louisa would not adhere to convention when it went against her own heart. She wasn’t afraid of being a “spinster”. When Nora became engaged to Joseph, I knew it would absolutely break her heart, but was she willing to give it up, NO. She knew what she
was sacrificing.

I also felt that she knew that for Anna it was right, but for her it wasn't. I enjoyed the letters between the sisters. Learned through them.


message 3: by Meghan (new)

Meghan | 115 comments I am going to say her conflict was about the independance to write....in essence they are intertwined and one can not be counted sperately. She was driven to write and be a successful writer, yet in order to do that she felt she needed complete independence ( don't necessarily agree with her on that). Therefore in her thinking in order to accomplish the primary goal of being a writer she had to also maintain complete independence.


message 4: by Lauren (new)

Lauren | 251 comments I'm with Meghan - I don't think you can entirely separate the two. That said, I do think her desire to get away from her family was based more on a need for independence than wanting to write. The book mentioned her having time to write (and also needing candles to write when it was dark), but she wanted to be away from all of that, hence the burning need to go to Boston.


message 5: by Ashley (new)

Ashley | 384 comments Mod
Nice, Meg: "The independence TO WRITE." Well put. Which actually makes me think Louisa wanted independence more than anything. For starters, she wasn't THAT great of a writer. That doesn't mean that she didn't desperately want to want, but I think her main objective was the need to not be tied down with obligation after obligation after obligation.


message 6: by Lauren (new)

Lauren | 251 comments Ashley wrote: "Nice, Meg: "The independence TO WRITE." Well put. Which actually makes me think Louisa wanted independence more than anything. For starters, she wasn't THAT great of a writer. That doesn't mean tha..."

Her father was the same - not a great writer (when it came to things meant for publication) but wanted the independence to go off and write (which he did). To that end, could her need for independence also stem from a desire to not subject any children she would have to the same haphazard upbringing?


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