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Grammar Central > Foreign Language Word of the Day

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message 1: by Boreal Elizabeth (last edited Aug 19, 2008 04:20PM) (new)

Boreal Elizabeth | 401 comments salam
hello in persian

http://www.easypersian.com/

i think i put this link up already but it should be on this thread

my word for today is ducet (very soft t)
= friend in persian


Boreal Elizabeth | 401 comments and now i have to run
i have some friends to meet by 5:30 and am hopping the bus for the cross town trip

got to go catch it


"you make me happy when skies are grey
you'll never know dear how much i love you
please don't take my sunshine away"

my blessed grandmother used to sing this to me when i was a little sunshine


message 3: by Prabha (new)

Prabha | 70 comments 'Salam' is also 'hello', or 'geetings', in Malay. The Persian influence, I think.

'Namaste' means 'Greetings' in Hindi.


message 4: by tayyebeh (new)

tayyebeh | 1 comments "khoda haafez"=bye in persian


message 5: by David (new)

David | 4568 comments Maururu in Tahitian.


message 6: by Debbie, sardonic princess of cheerfulness (new)

Debbie (sardonicprincessofcheerfulness) | 6387 comments Mod
Kia ora...informal greeting and farewell in Maori (pronounced key-ora).


Boreal Elizabeth | 401 comments thank you tay yebeh
now i can say hello and goodbye :)


message 8: by Symbol (last edited Aug 22, 2008 09:17PM) (new)

Symbol | 51 comments My word for the day is "taoiseach". The Taoiseach (pronounced "T-shock") is the Irish head of government, equivalent to a Prime Minister.


message 9: by Ken (new)

Ken | 18480 comments Mod
Symbol, maybe you can translate Enya songs for us (at times it just sounds like musical moaning).


message 10: by Boreal Elizabeth (new)

Boreal Elizabeth | 401 comments aye
tis the sea moaning round the isle lad
and the wind across the heath
and the mother's heart for her sick babe
and the woman's soul for her man
moaning like a beast is it
because life is all a losing
and it's sure sad when everything you love is pulled away from ye
and all's that's left is to keen


message 11: by Savvy (new)

Savvy  (savvysuzdolcefarniente) | 1456 comments FULANO- so and so (Dominican)

pg 256 of The Breif Life of Oscar Wao

"Well, fulano, who knows fulano, who knows fulano, said that that little girl is his daughter."


message 12: by David (new)

David | 4568 comments In Braz. Portuguese has same meaning.

"Fulano, cicrano e beltrano" means "Tom, Dick, and Harry."


message 13: by David (new)

David | 4568 comments Apparently, fulano comes from Arabic, where it means something like "such."

Beltrano is a name borrowed from the Franks.

Cicrano, who knows?


message 14: by M.D. (new)

M.D. (mdbenoit) My word is:

Allo

A casual greeting in French, meaning Hello or Hi


message 15: by Peter (new)

Peter Pier | 45 comments Salut?


message 16: by M.D. (new)

M.D. (mdbenoit) Salut is also a casual version of Good day.


message 17: by David (new)

David | 4568 comments Words used as toasts:

Saúde--"Your health" in Portuguese
Prosit--German
Kampai--Japanese, from the Shanghainese "Kanpai"
Salud, amor y pesetas--"Health, love and money" in Spanish
Cheers, or, Her Majesty the Queen--a common toast in Pommyland
"May the wind be always at your back, may the road rise to meet you, fand may the Good Lord keep you in the palm of his hand"--Irish toast




message 18: by Gail (new)

Gail Bloody mindedness, I think. I am constantly mystified by Gaelic orthography. My daughter, who is more learned in these matters than myself (she studies Welsh, Gaelic, etc.; I study Latin, Spanish, German)has not been able to find an explanation or rationale, either. I must always ask her the correct pronounciation (is that spelled wrong?) for Gaelic words as I am stymied.


message 19: by Debbie, sardonic princess of cheerfulness (new)

Debbie (sardonicprincessofcheerfulness) | 6387 comments Mod
You beat me to 'slainte' Donna. My grandmother was the daughter of an Irish sailor who emigrated to NZ....she always pronounced it 'shlonta'.
And I think the reason the orthography is so different is because of their diverse roots and seperate evolutionary paths...geography has little to do with it, particularly as the native inhabitants of Ireland were viewed as another species altogether by various foreign invaders (Romans, Vikings etc). English is more Germanic and Latin with a smattering of French thrown in after the conquest.....Gaelic is more your basic tribal French isn't it? Correct me if I'm wrong please....I like to have my facts straight and I am on shaky ground here!!


message 20: by Ken (new)

Ken | 18480 comments Mod
I think Russian and Polish are similar toasts: Nastrovia (sp).


message 21: by Debbie, sardonic princess of cheerfulness (last edited Aug 29, 2008 05:31PM) (new)

Debbie (sardonicprincessofcheerfulness) | 6387 comments Mod
Nasdrovya NE....make mine a double Black Russian.
And thanks Donna.....more grist for my mill! I always wondered if there was some relationship between Celtic and Gaelic.


message 22: by Ken (last edited Aug 29, 2008 05:31PM) (new)

Ken | 18480 comments Mod
Now spell it in Cyrillic and I'll buy you two -- both Boris AND Ivan.


message 23: by Debbie, sardonic princess of cheerfulness (new)

Debbie (sardonicprincessofcheerfulness) | 6387 comments Mod
I can't.....:-(


message 24: by Ken (new)

Ken | 18480 comments Mod
Don't feel bad. You'd have to borrow Cyril's keyboard for starters...


message 25: by Debbie, sardonic princess of cheerfulness (new)

Debbie (sardonicprincessofcheerfulness) | 6387 comments Mod
Grooooaaaan!!!!


message 26: by Marian (new)

Marian (gramma) | 39 comments I thought it was 2 words "nos" "Drovnya" Drovnia or Dobra in Polish means "good" The slavic languages began with one Slavonic language (Like Latin) & then evolved into Polish, Czech, Slovak,ect. like Latin broke down into Italian, French & Spanish. My husband spoke Polish, but when his parents generation (the people who arrived in the US in their adult years) passed away, the language was used less.


message 27: by Ken (new)

Ken | 18480 comments Mod
OK, looked it up and you're right about the two words, Marian:

POLISH = Na zdrowie!

RUSSIAN = Na zdorovje!


message 28: by Faeze (last edited Oct 24, 2009 06:29AM) (new)

Faeze | 12 comments Boreal Elizabeth wrote: "salam
hello in persian"


It was really interesting for me that you have mentioned three persian words here. I just wanted to add another one:

'Yar' (The pronounciation in persian is somehow close to 'yard' without 'd' in English) = 1. friend, 2. beloved (Actually the meaning depends on the context)




message 29: by Gail (new)

Gail | 9 comments I'm a Spanish teacher and I have a cognate word of the day. Example: didáctico=didactic astuto=astute.
The students have told me that many times the words i give them are on the SAT exam :)

Yesterday's word was lápida( lapidario, lapidar) which mean tombstone, lapidary and lapidate. We discussed that in Spanish a lapidario can be not only a person who carves tombstones or cuts precious stones, but also someone who stones someone! Of course, the kids wanted to know if that was the same as a stoner...


message 30: by Ken (last edited Oct 24, 2009 07:16AM) (new)

Ken | 18480 comments Mod
Baran -- Is "yar" used only among family and very close friends, or is it more informal, like when English-speaking peoples say, "You, my friend, are correct."

Gail -- Yes! The SAT's love Latin-based words and the Romance languages all were spawned by the Dead Language of Old. I know the word "lapidary" (having to do with precious stones) and the word "didactic" has a bit of a negative connotation nowadays, meaning "intended to teach a lesson." For instance, if a novel were didactic, it wouldn't be much of a compliment because that would make it too instructional, like a schoolmarm wrote it or some such.

My Foreign Language Mot du Jour:

lapsus linguae -- Latin for "slip of the tongue"

lapsus calami -- Latin for "slip of the pen"




message 31: by Faeze (new)

Faeze | 12 comments Boreal Elizabeth wrote: "my word for today is ducet (very soft t)
= friend in persian"


Actually 'Yar' is more formal than 'ducet' when used to mean 'friend' and it mostley suits literary works and formal pieces of writing.

'Yar' in the second sense is mostly used to mean sweetheart or mistress but again it is a literary word. I should add we rarely call a person 'Yar' as you used in your example except in songs, poems, ...


message 32: by David (new)

David | 4568 comments And then there are "dulcet" tones.


message 33: by Debbie, sardonic princess of cheerfulness (new)

Debbie (sardonicprincessofcheerfulness) | 6387 comments Mod
....and in upper-crust English, a long-drawn out 'Yaaar' means yes!


message 34: by Gail (new)

Gail | 9 comments with dulce being "sweet" in Spanish...


message 35: by David (new)

David | 4568 comments And this, from the well-known Wilfred Owen poem, citing the Latin:

If in some smothering dreams you too could pace
Behind the wagon that we flung him in,
And watch the white eyes writhing in his face,
His hanging face, like a devil's sick of sin;
If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood
Come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs,
Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud
Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues,
My friend, you would not tell with such high zest
To children ardent for some desperate glory,
The old Lie; Dulce et Decorum est
Pro patria mori.


message 36: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 16002 comments Mod
Thanks David. (I think.)


message 37: by David (last edited Oct 26, 2009 09:42AM) (new)

David | 4568 comments So a friend of the wife asked how to say "sheet" in Spanish. While on the phone with her friend, she asked me. Hard of hearing as I am, I heard "sheep," and said "ovejas," which was passed on.

There are now wooly domesticated ruminants on the friend's beds. The correct word is sábanas.


message 38: by Debbie, sardonic princess of cheerfulness (new)

Debbie (sardonicprincessofcheerfulness) | 6387 comments Mod
Heeheehee!


message 39: by Carol (new)

Carol | 10401 comments David wrote: "So a friend of the wife asked how to say "sheet" in Spanish. While on the phone with her friend, she asked me. Hard of hearing as I am, I heard "sheep," and said "ovejas," which was passed on.

Th..."


It could only happen to you David. hahahahahaaha. Now me I have perfect hearing. huh what did you say? hehehe


message 40: by David (new)

David | 4568 comments The friend is not even from one of those nationalities rumoured by the malicious to be on intimate terms with our wooly confrères,


message 41: by Debbie, sardonic princess of cheerfulness (new)

Debbie (sardonicprincessofcheerfulness) | 6387 comments Mod
Huh?!! (Flounces off to Gabi's place to mutter......)


message 42: by Carol (new)

Carol | 10401 comments Don't forget your wai



message 43: by David (new)

David | 4568 comments See the limerick.


message 44: by Debbie, sardonic princess of cheerfulness (new)

Debbie (sardonicprincessofcheerfulness) | 6387 comments Mod
Wai.....is Maori for water.....think I'd rather take rum! I did see your limerick David.....llamas indeed (snort)!!


message 45: by Harvey (new)

Harvey | 1065 comments ♪ Baran wrote: "Boreal Elizabeth wrote: "my word for today is ducet (very soft t)
= friend in persian"

Actually 'Yar' is more formal than 'ducet' when used to mean 'friend' and it mostley suits literary works..."


But then Edward FitzGerald translated "Ay doost beya...." as "Ah my beloved...." as on the rubaiyee:

Ah, my Beloved, fill the Cup that clears
TO-DAY of past Regrets and future Fears-
To-morrow?-Why, To-morrow I may be
Myself with Yesterday's Sev'n Thousand Years.



message 46: by David (last edited Nov 22, 2009 08:48PM) (new)

David | 4568 comments A word from Spanish 1 or 2: ratazanas, "big fecking rats," with an unusual augmentative, pejorative as the often are in Spanish.

[image error]

Most of the pictures refer to Brazilian sites. Maybe it's a Portuguese word. More research needed.

UPDATE: It's a Portuguese word, not Spanish at all. Still a great word.


message 47: by Carol (new)

Carol | 10401 comments Disgusting creatures.


message 48: by Harvey (new)

Harvey | 1065 comments Reminds me of Sunny Side UpArthur Marshall who liked the word 'Zanzara'... as in Senora Zanzara etc.... Zanzara is Spanish for mosquito, not my favourite creatures either!


message 49: by Ken (new)

Ken | 18480 comments Mod
Rats are people, too.


message 50: by Harvey (new)

Harvey | 1065 comments Soylent Green are people... oops! wrong discussion!


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