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Television & Radio > TV TALK (PART ONE) (2011) (ongoing thread for 2011)

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message 1: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (joyofglensfalls) | 16697 comments TV TALK (PART ONE) (2011) (ongoing thread for 2011)

INTRODUCTION

In our "Movies" section we often talk about films we see on TV and that's fine... that's how it should be. However, if we want to talk about other TV shows like sitcoms, we might want to post comments here.

Of course, the line between TV and Movies is blurred, especially now that we can obtain DVDs (e.g., from Netflix) of many of the series which originally aired on TV.

So it's up to the individual poster to decide where he/she wants to place his/her comments. This is just another avenue.


message 2: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Feb 12, 2011 11:34AM) (new)

Joy H. (joyofglensfalls) | 16697 comments That said, I'd like to say that I just learned something which you probably already know:
The TV comedy series, "30 Rock" gets its name from "30 Rockefeller Plaza" which is the address of the fictional TV studio in the TV series.

I had never been interested in "30 Rock" but when I learned that comedian, Tina Fey, had created the series, I became curious about it. I discovered that the series is streamable from Netflix. So I tried it. I watched the first 3 episodes.
"30 Rock" (TV Series 2006 – ____ ):
http://movies.netflix.com/Search?oq=&...
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0496424/
STORYLINE: "Liz Lemon (Tina Fey), head writer of the sketch comedy show ... must deal with an arrogant new boss (Alec Baldwin) and a crazy new star (Tracy Morgan), all while trying to run a successful TV show without losing her mind."

It seemed pretty silly to me, too many weird characters. But I do like seeing the interaction between Fey and Baldwin. I'm not sure if I'll try another episode. Perhaps the show will get better after I get to know some of the weird characters. :)


message 3: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Feb 13, 2011 01:57PM) (new)

Joy H. (joyofglensfalls) | 16697 comments PS-Here's the IMDb Award Page for "30 Rock".
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0496424/a...
It received lots of Emmys and Golden Globes. Lots of other awards too. (rec'd both nominations and wins)


message 4: by Jackie (new)

Jackie (thelastwolf) | 4050 comments Does anyone besides me regularly watch TV?


message 5: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (joyofglensfalls) | 16697 comments Jackie wrote: "Does anyone besides me regularly watch TV?"

Jackie, I've found that there are less and less programs on TV which interest me. I watch TV mostly for the news and a few talk shows. I also enjoy movies on TCM when they interest me. I also watch the award shows (Oscars, Golden Globes, and SAG). I try to catch the Kennedy Center Honors each year. On New Years Eve we watch the ball come down and on New Years Day I like to watch the Concert from Vienna. The reality shows don't interest me one bit. There are very few sitcoms or drama series which draw me in. Sports don't interest me either.

More and more I use our TV for watching DVDs and for streaming Netflix. I catch up with PBS shows like Masterpiece Theater via Netflix.


message 6: by Jackie (last edited Feb 13, 2011 02:30PM) (new)

Jackie (thelastwolf) | 4050 comments TV has gone downhill in a big way with the advent of reality TV. I don't care for sitcoms or sports neither. I get sucked into the drama series. And scifi or fantasy series will attract me.

If you find any good Masterpiece Theater, let me know and I'll try to find it on PBS or at the library. I'm always interested in those.


message 7: by Jackie (new)

Jackie (thelastwolf) | 4050 comments I just noticed that 'Any Human Heart' will be on PBS tonight at 9 PM. My British friend Lisa told me to look out for it because it's very good. She keeps me updated to all the British TV shows and I return the favor with American TV shows.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1631891/

A novelist's life ricochets from 1920s Paris to '50s New York and '80s London. Along the way he meets Ernest Hemingway, Ian Fleming and the Duke and Duchess of Windsor - the exiled British king and his mistress Wallis Simpson.


message 8: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Feb 13, 2011 04:57PM) (new)

Joy H. (joyofglensfalls) | 16697 comments Thank you, Jackie! "Any Human Heart" should be very interesting. I plan to watch it (9 to 10:30 PM), even though it's competing with the Grammy Awards which will be on from 8 to 11:30 PM on CBS.

Actually, I'm not very familiar with the pop stars who will be at the Grammys. The list includes: Lady Gaga, Katy Perry, Rihanna, Eminem, Cee Lo Green, Bob Dylan, and Justin Bieber.
Barbra Streisand, Dolly Parton, and Julie Andrews were honored at separate ceremonies.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/02...
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20110213/p...-
http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/award...

Looks like a busy night. :)


message 9: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (joyofglensfalls) | 16697 comments PS-The user review at IMDb says that "Any Human Heart" has a "a complex storyline." I'll have to pay attention. :)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1631891/


message 10: by Jackie (new)

Jackie (thelastwolf) | 4050 comments The friend who told me about it said: I thought it was very good and very moving too, it made me cry in places.

She's pretty good at recommending movies and TV that I will like. I've got it set on the DVR because I'm sure it continues next week, maybe longer. Imdb has it listed for 4 episodes but often PBS will give us an episode and a half. I guess we'll see soon enough.


message 11: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Feb 14, 2011 08:02AM) (new)

Joy H. (joyofglensfalls) | 16697 comments Jackie, I found the following online about "Any Human Heart" (TV Series 2010):
===========================================================
"... a new three-part miniseries. "Any Human Heart" is an adaptation of William Boyd's novel of a wayward 20th century writer. The film adapted by Boyd himself, starts with Jim Broadbent as Logan Mountstuart, looking back on his life, with Sam Claflin as the college version and the familiar Matthew Macfadyen ... as the grown man and contemporary of Ernest Hemingway and Ian Fleming. The main problem is that he's such a cad, that he's hard to love, let alone follow over six hour miniseries.
FROM: http://blogs.courant.com/roger_catlin...
========================================================

As it says above, the movie was adapted from the book:
Any Human Heart (2002) by William Boyd

PS-Below is a link to what looks like an interesting review of the film's first episode:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/tv...

PPS-Below is a link to a review of the last (4th) episode:
http://www.daemonstv.com/2010/12/13/a...
(It might have spoilers, but then again, it might help us to better understand the film.)


message 12: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Feb 14, 2011 08:01AM) (new)

Joy H. (joyofglensfalls) | 16697 comments PPPS-Below is a link to a long excerpt from the book:
"Any Human Heart: The Intimate Journals of Logan Montstuart"
By William Boyd (2002):
http://www.mostlyfiction.com/excerpts...
(Oy, lots of detail!)

The synopsis at the above link (at the bottom of the page) says:
===========================================================
"the story of Logan Mountstuart —writer, lover and man of the world— through his intimate journals.
"Here is the 'riotous and disorganized reality' of Mountstuart’s eighty-five years in all their extraordinary, tragic and humorous aspects. The journals begin with his boyhood in Montevideo, Uruguay; then move to Oxford in the 1920s and the publication of his first book; then on to Paris (where he meets Joyce, Picasso, Hemingway, et al.) and to Spain where he covers the civil war. During World War II, we see him as an agent for Naval Intelligence, becoming embroiled in a murder scandal that involves the Duke and Duchess of Windsor. The postwar years bring him to New York as an art dealer in the world of 1950s abstract expressionism, then on to West Africa, to London (where he has a run-in with the Baader-Meinhof Gang) and, finally, to France where, in his old age, he acquires a measure of hard-won serenity.

"A moving, ambitious and richly conceived novel that summons up the heroics and follies of twentieth-century life."
=========================================================

No wonder it's called "complicated". :)


message 13: by Jackie (new)

Jackie (thelastwolf) | 4050 comments Thank you for finding out the info. Now I know how many episodes it'll be recording.


message 14: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (joyofglensfalls) | 16697 comments You're welcome, Jackie. As you can see, my curiosity has been piqued.


message 15: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Feb 14, 2011 08:50AM) (new)

Joy H. (joyofglensfalls) | 16697 comments Well, Logan Mountstuart WAS a cad (as mentioned above in the quote in Message #11). I wonder what trouble he's going to get into in the next episodes!


message 16: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Feb 14, 2011 08:49AM) (new)

Joy H. (joyofglensfalls) | 16697 comments PS-I found the following review of "Any Human Heart":
==========================================================
"A downtrodden old man remembers his life from horny undergraduate through years as a struggling author to his dog food-eating latter days, in William Boyd’s simultaneously brilliant, infuriating, and often downright ridiculous (though never less than entertaining) adaptation of his own novel, which – despite lasting more than five hours, five hours filled with sex, death, and twentieth century history – often feels rather rushed."
-by Iain Stott at http://1linereview.blogspot.com/2010/...
=========================================================
BTW, the above was the only link for External Reviews at IMDb.

Somehow, after watching last night's part of the series on TV, I got the feeling that the famous celebrities like Hemingway were thrown into the story simply to attract an audience. So far, they really aren't an integral part of the plot, even though they do place the time and setting of the story. For example, the appearance of the Duchess of Windsor with the Duke on the golf course had nothing to do with the basic story. It seemed to be just "slipped" in there to spark the movie, IMO. Simple headlines to the historical events would have accomplished the same thing in indicating the chronology of the story.


message 17: by Katherine (new)

Katherine Totten (katherine42) | 199 comments Jackie wrote: "Does anyone besides me regularly watch TV?"
Hi Jackie,
Yes, I consider myself an avid TV watcher. My tastes in TV are as varied as my reading habits. Some of the programs I regularly watch are: Castle; Life After People (History Ch.); Commanders at War (Military Ch)
Top Chef; Project Runway; Glee; Masterpiece Theater and American Experience on PBS; Law & Order UK (BBC America; and on and on. Right now I'm into the reruns of Spartacus on Showtime. I enjoyed Showtime's The Tudors and hope to enjoy their version of Camelot when it airs this spring.


message 18: by Jackie (new)

Jackie (thelastwolf) | 4050 comments Camelot! This is the first I've heard of it. I'll have to watch that. I like the pay cable channel's original series.


message 19: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (joyofglensfalls) | 16697 comments When I think of "Camelot", I automatically think of the 1967 film with Franco Nero as Lancelot and Vanessa Redgrave as Guenevere. She was so young a beautiful. He was so handsome. They made a gorgeous couple. I don't think anything can top that for me when it comes to those two characters.
"Camelot" (1967)
http://movies.netflix.com/Movie/Camel...
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0061439/


message 20: by Katherine (new)

Katherine Totten (katherine42) | 199 comments UPDATE:
Camelot will be on Starz and produced by the producers of Showtime's The Tudous. Sorry for the confusion.

A sneak preview will be aired directly after the finale of Spartacus-Gods of the Arena on March 25th, with the series starting in April 1st. I watched the trailer and it's certainly not the Camelot we remember from the 60's. I think it's more of a medieval Spartacus, if you get my drift.

HBO will be showing the medieval series, Game of Thrones in mid-April. It is based on the books, Song of Ice and Fire. This one also looks good.


message 21: by Katherine (new)

Katherine Totten (katherine42) | 199 comments Katherine wrote: "UPDATE:
Camelot will be on Starz and produced by the producers of Showtime's The Tudous. Sorry for the confusion.

A sneak preview will be aired directly after the finale of Spartacus-Gods of th..."


Sorry I spelled "Tudors" wrong.


message 22: by Jim (new)

Jim (jimmaclachlan) | 6318 comments We just watched the first two of the three Jeopardy episodes with Watson against Jennings & Rutter. I'm not too surprised by the results. I don't want to say more & spoil it for anyone. Is anyone else watching it?


message 23: by Katherine (new)

Katherine Totten (katherine42) | 199 comments Jim wrote: "We just watched the first two of the three Jeopardy episodes with Watson against Jennings & Rutter. I'm not too surprised by the results. I don't want to say more & spoil it for anyone. Is anyon..."

Absolutely watching Watson on Jeopardy. Like you, I'm not surprised, but would rather see different results.


message 24: by Jackie (new)

Jackie (thelastwolf) | 4050 comments Yes, I'm watching Watson on Jeopardy. I expected he'd win but it's still amazing to watch.

Katherine, Starz, OK got it. Thanks. The extended trailer for HBO's A Game of Thrones looks spectacular. That's my most anticipated series of the year. I can hardly wait!


message 25: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Feb 15, 2011 08:30PM) (new)

Joy H. (joyofglensfalls) | 16697 comments Yes, I've been watching the Jeopardy shows with IBM's Watson, the supercomputer. To tell the truth, I don't enjoy watching the two contestants competing with Watson's artificial intelligence. Watson is too quick to answer and gets most of the answers first. I like it more when there are a few seconds to digest the question before the contestants ring in. With Watson the questions and answers fire too quickly... bang, bang, bang. It seems too automated. There's no time for thought.

Sure, the creation of the supercomputer with artificial intelligence is a huge feat, an impressive accomplishment. But that doesn't mean it makes good entertainment on TV.

Jim, I'm glad you brought up the subject of Watson. I've been wanting to say these things! (lol)

PS-Here's a link to info re Watson:
http://whatis.techtarget.com/definiti...


message 26: by Jackie (last edited Feb 15, 2011 09:34PM) (new)

Jackie (thelastwolf) | 4050 comments Joy wrote: But that doesn't mean it makes good entertainment on TV.

You're right about the entertainment factor. I don't enjoy seeing the two greatest Jeopardy champs look like chumps.
Watson is an amazing feat of technology, especially with understanding the nuances of the English language, further complicated by the way the Jeopardy 'questions' are formulated.
But it's still not as much fun to watch as I thought it would be.


message 27: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Feb 15, 2011 10:29PM) (new)

Joy H. (joyofglensfalls) | 16697 comments Jackie wrote: "I don't enjoy seeing the two greatest Jeopardy champs look like chumps. ..."

LOL - Yes, Jackie, I agree. It was painful to watch them stand there helplessly while Winston made them look stupid.


message 28: by Jim (new)

Jim (jimmaclachlan) | 6318 comments Watson is too quick on the buzzer. I hope they change that a bit for tonight's game. The contestants can't ring in until Alex stops talking. Since Watson is getting a text at the same time the clue goes up, it has all that time to figure the answer & can then ring in as soon as it gets the 'go ahead' signal. Unfair, IMO. Jennings was often pressing the buzzer, but didn't get in to answer.

The first game's categories also favored Watson. They were mostly straight forward, specific questions - encyclopedic lookups, if you will. I wasn't surprised that Watson was able to answer most accurately.

The final Jeopardy answer wasn't & Watson's answer was plain bizarre. It didn't even give a US city. It had the same problem with guessing the decade. Did you notice that it kept coming up with a single year in 2000+ as one answer?


message 29: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (joyofglensfalls) | 16697 comments Jim wrote: "Watson is too quick on the buzzer. ... The first game's categories also favored Watson. ..."

Those are good observations, Jim. I wonder if they'll adjust Watson's buzzer reaction time. Maybe they should. If they delayed it enough, it would be like a handicap in golf. Not a bad idea! It would show off Watson but would still give the real people a chance.


message 30: by Jackie (new)

Jackie (thelastwolf) | 4050 comments I noticed it too. I feel it gives Watson an unfair advantage.


message 31: by Jim (new)

Jim (jimmaclachlan) | 6318 comments Well, Watson brought it home, although Jennings got it together for a while. That buzzer seemed to be the main issue, though. That & Watson got 5 of the 6 double jeopardies available. I liked Jennings' final answer, though.


message 32: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Feb 16, 2011 07:14PM) (new)

Joy H. (joyofglensfalls) | 16697 comments Jim wrote: "... I liked Jennings' final answer, though."

Yes, Jim, Jennings final answer was great. I found it at the LA Times online (2/16/11):
=========================================================
"Ken Jennings, ever a good sport, bowed to the new 'Jeopardy!' champ. 'I for one welcome our new computer overlords,' he wrote on his video screen, quoting an episode of 'The Simpsons.' "
The LA Times also said:
" 'Jeopardy!' has a new champion, and its name is Watson. ... The win is a publicity coup for IBM, which created Watson as part of its Great Mind Challenge series. The company hopes to sell Watson’s question-answering technology for use in hospitals and call center help desks."
FROM: http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/showt...
===========================================================

**********************************************************
Wall Street Journal online 2/16/11 said:
"Last year, writer Stephen Baker approached Houghton Mifflin Harcourt with an idea for a book about an IBM computer designed to compete against humans on Jeopardy! ...
... The result, Final Jeopardy: Man vs. Machine and the Quest to Know Everything, will go on sale in hardcover tomorrow."
FROM: http://blogs.wsj.com/speakeasy/2011/0...
********************************************************

Another online article 2/16/11 said:
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"Jennings and Rutter had several strong runs, once taking seven questions in a row between them. In the end, however, Watson won the $1 million grand prize, which is slated to go to charity.
Jennings will receive $300,000 and Rutter will get $200,000. Both men said they will donate half of their winnings to charities."
FROM: http://www.computerworld.com/s/articl...
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


message 33: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Feb 16, 2011 07:26PM) (new)

Joy H. (joyofglensfalls) | 16697 comments PS-Here's link to the hardcover edition of the book:
_Final Jeopardy: Man vs. Machine and the Quest to Know Everything_
Final Jeopardy: Man vs. Machine and the Quest to Know Everything (2011)
by Stephen Baker:
http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/98...

(The other link in my previous message was to the Kindle edition. The descriptions are different. The Kindle description includes "Q & A With Author Stephen Baker".)


message 34: by Jackie (new)

Jackie (thelastwolf) | 4050 comments Ken's final answer was hilarious.


message 35: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Feb 16, 2011 08:40PM) (new)

Joy H. (joyofglensfalls) | 16697 comments Not only that, Jackie, I think it saved face. He acknowledged defeat gracefully... and with a bit of satire. :) In fact it was exquisite!

(Jennings' answer can be seen in Message #32 above.)


message 36: by Jackie (new)

Jackie (thelastwolf) | 4050 comments Ken always had a sense of humor during his long reign on Jeopardy. I really like him.


message 37: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (joyofglensfalls) | 16697 comments Jim, did you see the final question on Jeopardy today? It asked about the man for whom KY flew the flag at half-mast for 4 days when he died.
The answer was "Colonel Sanders".
Two contestants got it. The other answered with "Jim Beam". :)

The category was "Entrepreneurs".
The wording was: "When he passed away in December 1980, flags in Kentucky flew at half-staff for 4 days"
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_was_th...


message 38: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (joyofglensfalls) | 16697 comments PS-Curious, as usual, I went to Wiki and found this about "Jim Beam":
========================================================
"During the late 18th century, members of the Boehm family, who eventually changing the spelling of their surname to "Beam", emigrated from Germany and settled in Kentucky. Johannes 'Reginald' Beam (1770–1834) was a farmer that began producing whiskey in the style now referred to as bourbon. Jacob Beam sold his first barrels of corn whiskey around 1795. The whiskey was first called Old Jake Beam, and the distillery was known as Old Tub."
========================================================
FROM: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jim_Beam


message 39: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (joyofglensfalls) | 16697 comments PPS-Still being curious, I went to Wiki and found this:
==========================================================
"Bourbon is a type of American whiskey – a distilled spirit made primarily from corn (maize). The name of the spirit derives from its historical association with an area known as Old Bourbon, around what is now Bourbon County, Kentucky (which, in turn, got its name from the French House of Bourbon royal family). It has been produced since the 18th century. While it may be made anywhere in the United States, it is strongly associated with Kentucky. The bourbon produced in Tennessee is typically referred to as Tennessee whiskey or Sour mash whiskey rather than as bourbon."
FROM: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bourbon_...
==========================================================

How's that for history? :)


message 40: by Jim (new)

Jim (jimmaclachlan) | 6318 comments I think that was an old Jeopardy, Joy. I do recall that question coming up. Both Marg & I got it. He was a Kentucky Colonel which is more of a citizenship award than anything.

Claudia Sanders, his wife, has a restaurant just on the other side of Shelbyville from us.
http://www.claudiasanders.com/
It's not that great, but OK occasionally. It's sort of fancy, but fancy around here, in these times, doesn't mean much. The Science Hill Inn is fancier & even there jeans are OK. There are some cool shops in that old building, though.


message 41: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (joyofglensfalls) | 16697 comments Jim, Claudia Sanders Dinner House looks like a beautiful place!

Here's the Wiki page for Colonel Sanders:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colonel_...
You have to admire his hard work and determination.


message 42: by Jim (new)

Jim (jimmaclachlan) | 6318 comments Here's an article by Ken Jennings about the Jeopardy match.
http://www.slate.com/id/2284721/pagen...


message 43: by Jackie (last edited Feb 17, 2011 11:34AM) (new)

Jackie (thelastwolf) | 4050 comments From the article: "Watching you on Jeopardy! is what inspired the whole project," one IBM engineer told me [Ken Jennings], consolingly. "And we looked at your games over and over, your style of play. There's a lot of you in Watson."

How freaking awesome is that? (As you can probably tell, I'm a big Ken Jennings fan.)

Joy, the 12:30 airing of Jeopardy in our area is indeed reruns. I remember that question also.


message 44: by Jackie (last edited Feb 17, 2011 11:35AM) (new)

Jackie (thelastwolf) | 4050 comments PS: Anyone can apply to be a Kentucky Colonel. My cousin applied so now I call him 'The Colonel'. lol


message 45: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Feb 17, 2011 11:48AM) (new)

Joy H. (joyofglensfalls) | 16697 comments Thanks, Jackie. I'm reading the article Jim referred us to now. Yes, the parallels between the Watson computer and Jennings' brain are awesome.
===========================================================
Jennings says (in the same article):
"The computer's techniques for unraveling Jeopardy! clues sounded just like mine. That machine zeroes in on key words in a clue, then combs its memory (in Watson's case, a 15-terabyte data bank of human knowledge) for clusters of associations with those words. It rigorously checks the top hits against all the contextual information it can muster: the category name; the kind of answer being sought; the time, place, and gender hinted at in the clue; and so on. And when it feels "sure" enough, it decides to buzz. This is all an instant, intuitive process for a human Jeopardy! player, but I felt convinced that under the hood my brain was doing more or less the same thing."
FROM: http://www.slate.com/id/2284721/pagen...
===========================================================

I wonder what Jennings' I.Q. is.


message 46: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Feb 17, 2011 11:53AM) (new)

Joy H. (joyofglensfalls) | 16697 comments Did you know the following:

"Daily Doubles (in Jeopardy) aren't distributed randomly across the board; as Watson well knows, they're more likely to be in some places than others."
[FROM the Jennings article we're discussing)

I didn't realize this.


message 47: by Joy H., Group Founder (last edited Feb 17, 2011 12:16PM) (new)

Joy H. (joyofglensfalls) | 16697 comments Jim, the Jennings article was extremely interesting. Thanks for pointing us to it. Jennings writes so very well!

He was smart to say: "That was Watson's role, as a symbol and product of human innovation and ingenuity." That's what Watson is!

But there are still doubters. See the following article entitled:
"What humans know that Watson doesn't":
http://www.cnn.com/2011/OPINION/02/17...

PS-The article says: "It is the informal, tacit*, embodied knowledge that is the hardest for computers to grasp, but it is often such knowledge that is most crucial to our lives."

That's the big challenge for Watson!

[As we know, "tacit" means: "implied by or inferred from actions or statements".]

Can a computer "infer" when things are merely implied?

As Jennings said in his article:
"Jeopardy! clues cover an open domain of human knowledge—every subject imaginable—and are full of booby traps for computers: puns, slang, wordplay, oblique allusions."


message 48: by Jackie (new)

Jackie (thelastwolf) | 4050 comments I didn't know that either. I notice they are more often in the higher dollar amount clues but I have seen them in the lower ones too.


message 49: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (joyofglensfalls) | 16697 comments Also, Jennings used the word "sentient". Yes, can a computer become "sentient", i.e., can it have feelings? Aren't feelings important too?


message 50: by Joy H., Group Founder (new)

Joy H. (joyofglensfalls) | 16697 comments My mind is whirling from thinking about all of this Watson/Jeopardy stuff. My brain is in jeopardy of crashing! (lol)


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