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Chapter 4: Asking the Experts

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message 1: by Franki (new)

Franki Sibberson | 19 comments Mod
This is for discussions around thoughts and ideas from Chapter 4.


message 2: by Cathy (new)

Cathy Mere (catmere) | 11 comments While this chapter was called "Asking the Experts" it could have been called "Becoming An Expert" because it shared many ways experts work and move toward expertise.

The key points in this chapter (experts break problems into parts, rely on evidence, look for patterns, consider other perspectives, follow hunches, use familiar ideas in new ways, collaborate, welcome critique, revise, persist, seek new challenge, know how they work best) really take me back to a question of Tony's (I think in chapter 1). Tony asked do we move so quickly through standards and indicators that we forget to slow down to learn? I wonder, do we provide opportunities for students to really follow interests? To pursue deeper understanding? To practice and find success? To become "expert"?

It seems being an expert requires time and do we find this in our classroom for our children?


message 3: by Gaby (new)

Gaby Richard-harrington | 13 comments My first reaction to this chapter is realizing how few teachers I have worked with have met this book's definition of expert. 10,000 hours of deliberate practice, consider other's perspective, use familiar ideas in new ways, collaborate, welcome critique, revise repeatedly, seek out new challenges....
Yikes!
How many teachers have created one set of lectures and repeated them for 10-20 years? How many welcome other teachers into their rooms to give feedback?

I consider myself on the path to expert. My path is well worn, but I cannot say I am there. The end keeps moving farther away! Teaching has a constantly moving path and destination which is different from some other careers.

How many are up for the new challenges of moving to more student centered and 21st century modes? How many embrace change including the use of technology?

This chapter also makes me think of all the ways that I need to revise classwork and homework to make it more valuable.


message 4: by Tony (new)

Tony Keefer (keeferto) | 6 comments I really enjoyed thinking about the traits of experts shared this chapter.  Lots and lots to think about.  I think what I lied the most was the downplaying of experts are smart.  While I do think that any definition of expert or any examination of expertise does need to include adept level of knowledge within a discipline, I do think that we tend to get wrapped up in what experts know instead of what they do.

I also love that some of the the things listed under the heading of Habits of Experts are character traits that require a good measure of humility.  For example:

Experts ask good questions 
Experts rely on evidence
Experts consider other opinions
Experts welcome critique
Experts collaborate

I think that demystifying the idea of an expert, but also elevating the habits that are essential to obtaining expertise will be one that sticks with me for a while.  Would be interesting to see an expert who is really strong at helping others become more expert like.


message 5: by Tony (new)

Tony Keefer (keeferto) | 6 comments Catmere wrote: "While this chapter was called "Asking the Experts" it could have been called "Becoming An Expert" because it shared many ways experts work and move toward expertise."

I agree with this thinking and echoing what Gaby said, "I may be on the path of becoming an expert, but I have a long way to go.


message 6: by Franki (new)

Franki Sibberson | 19 comments Mod
After reading this chapter, I want to go back and read Outliers. So much about the hours spent that is so interesting. As a teacher, a reader, a writer, etc. experience is at the heart of becoming an expert. Wonder what our kids spend 10,000 hours doing throughout school K-12?


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