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message 1: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
We guess that considering current situations in Egypt we should start a separate current events thread to discuss these events and post updates as they come in.


message 2: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Feb 05, 2011 02:44PM) (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
Here is a good discussion which was presented by Democracy Now: (I think these guys are not on the right: they call themselves progressives - but I would say left of center)

Its title: Uprising in Egypt: A Two-Hour Special on the Revolt Against the U.S.-Backed Mubarak Regime

In a special Saturday edition, Democracy Now! airs a two-hour broadcast.

Highlights include:

Live Reports from Cairo with Democracy Now! senior producer Sharif Abdel Kouddous and Democracy Now! correspondent Anjali Kamat.

Egyptian novelist Ahdaf Soueif on how life in Tahrir Square "is truly democracy in action."

Columbia professor Rashid Khalidi on the impact of the Egyptian and Tunisian uprisings on the Middle East.

Mohamed Abdel Dayem of the Committee to Protect Journalists on the continued attacks on journalists by supporters of the Mubarak regime.

Khaled Fahmy, professor at the American University in Cairo, on reports that Hosni Mubarak has resigned as head of the ruling NDP party.

University of California-Santa Barbara professor Paul Amar on the military’s role in a post-Mubarak Egypt.

Stanford Professor Joel Beinin on the Egyptian labor movement and the historical roots of the Jan. 25 uprising.

Egyptian-American activist Mostafa Omar on the role of Egyptian youth in the protests.

And Democracy Now plays the "video that started the revolution"–Asmaa Mahfouz’s Jan. 18th message calling for protests in Tahrir Square on Jan. 25.


Here is the link to the program:

http://www.democracynow.org/2011/2/5/...

What is Democracy Now? - Source: Wikipedia

Democracy Now! is an American daily independent syndicated program of news, analysis, and opinion aired by more than 900 radio, television, satellite and cable TV networks in North America. The award-winning one hour "War and Peace Report" is hosted by progressive investigative journalists Amy Goodman and Juan Gonzalez, and serves as the flagship program for Pacifica Radio network.[1] The program is funded entirely through contributions from listeners, viewers, and foundations and does not accept advertisers, corporate underwriting, or government funding.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Democrac...!


message 3: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Feb 05, 2011 02:37PM) (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
Report from Aljazeera in terms of what is coming out of Iran

This was their header:

Khamenei hails 'Islamic' uprisings
Iranian supreme leader urges Egyptians to follow in the footsteps of Iran's 1979 revolution.


It really amazes me about these people; they have a lot to say about other countries aside from their own where they brutally thwarted and oppressed their own protestors. Yet they are inciting them in other countries. Very sad; these poor Egyptian people are being used; I do hope things are settled peaceably.

http://english.aljazeera.net/news/mid...


message 4: by Garret (new)

Garret (ggannuch) Bentley wrote: "We guess that considering current situations in Egypt we should start a separate current events thread to discuss these events and post updates as they come in."

Great Idea


message 5: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
Garret, please feel free to add any items or links.


message 6: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
US escalates pressure on Egypt
Egyptian foreign minister says Washington seemed to be trying to impose its will on Cairo. (The Al Jazeera View)


http://english.aljazeera.net/news/mid...


message 7: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Feb 10, 2011 04:34AM) (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
Egypt foreign minister criticises US calls for change

The BBC View

Egypt's foreign minister has rebuffed calls from Washington to speed up the pace of political reform.

Rejecting a US demand to lift a state of emergency, Ahmed Aboul Gheit said Washington should not "impose" its will on "a great country".

Many thousands of Egyptians have been protesting since 25 January calling for President Hosni Mubarak to step down.

Wednesday saw protests in Cairo spread to Egypt's parliament, with violence and reports of strikes in other cities.

An organised protest camp now exists in Tahrir Square in the centre of Cairo, the focal point for demonstrations now in their 17th day.

TV pictures on Thursday showed crowds once again heading for a rally in the square. Numbers in Tahrir Square are expected to be at their largest on Friday, when organisers have called for another huge demonstration.

Google executive Wael Ghonim, who has become a figurehead for many in the protest movement after being released from 12 days of detention, said on Thursday he had no plans to stay involved in politics longer than necessary.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middl...


message 8: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Feb 10, 2011 05:10PM) (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
Journalists are being harrassed and worse:

Katie Couric:

http://www.aolnews.com/2011/02/03/kat...

Anderson Cooper

http://www.aolnews.com/2011/02/02/and...

Greg Palkot and Olaf Wiig

http://www.thewrap.com/media/column-p...

Graphic - these Fox news journalist and photographer were badly beaten. Their first post video.

http://video.foxnews.com/v/4526742/ex...

All of the above stated that it was the Pro-Mubarak supporters who were doing this.


message 9: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
Egyptian reporter dies; first journalist killed in clashes


Update at 5:10 p.m. ET: The reporter, 36-year-old Ahmed Mohammed Mahmoud, was shot by a sniper Jan. 28 on the balcony of his home near Tahrir Square as he took photos of clashes between protesters and security forces, the state-run newspaper Al-Ahram reported, according to the Associated Press.

Mahmoud worked for Al-Taawun, a newspaper also published by Al-Ahram.

Journalists continued to be attacked and detained today, and some newsrooms shut down. Al Jazeera's Arabic-language offices were set on fire in Cairo.

The Committee to Protect Journalists said it had documented nearly a dozen attacks and eight detentions. The New York Times writes that the violence and intimidation were not as widespread as on Thursday, "when a coordinated campaign of media intimidation hit its peak."

Original post: An Egyptian reporter shot last week has died, the first journalist killed in street clashes between President Hosni Mubarak's loyalists and democratic opponents, the Associated Press is reporting, citing an official newspaper.

The news comes as President Obama is speaking about the crisis. Appearing at the White House with Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper, Obama says the attacks against reporters, human rights workers and peaceful protesters is "unacceptable and says it violates international norms and human rights.

He said a government transition must begin "now," adding that "the future of Egypt will be determined by its people" and that "the entire world is watching."

Our colleagues at The Oval are covering the news conference.

http://content.usatoday.com/communiti...


message 10: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
Al Jazeera's headline:

Suleiman: The CIA's man in Cairo

http://english.aljazeera.net/indepth/...


message 11: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Feb 10, 2011 05:35PM) (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
Al Jazeera English: Live Stream

http://english.aljazeera.net/watch_now/

Couric has gone back to New York, and Brian Williams I believe is in London. Other CBS journalists were detained; CNN journalists were harassed and beaten, Fox News journalists were badly beaten and hospitalized. One of Al Jazeera's journalists is reported missing.


message 12: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Feb 10, 2011 05:38PM) (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
Hosni Mubarak Doesn't Resign, Cairo's Tahrir Square Erupts with Anger

Egypt's Embattled President Announces Reforms but Won't Step Down Despite Protesters' Demands

BY TERRY MORAN, NASSER ATTA, JIM SCUITTO, BRIAN HARTMAN, JON GARCIA AND HUMA KHAN
CAIRO, Egypt Feb. 10, 2011

http://abcnews.go.com/International/e...

Source: ABC


message 13: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Feb 13, 2011 09:56AM) (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
This is a note from Sridhar:

Sridhar said:

Hi,
This is an small idea that occurred to me while reading news today. Our group members are well read in history. Wouldnt it be great if all of us could contribute to the current events in context of the historical knowledge we have?
For example, Do you think NAM would get new impetus in lieu of the Revolution in Egypt?

I checked for appropriate thread to post this , but was unable to find any. Pardon if this post is not meant here.


message 14: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Feb 13, 2011 09:59AM) (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
Sridhar,

We have a Current Events folder which has numerous threads where this might fit:

http://www.goodreads.com/topic/group_fol...

I will also move the above note to the Current Events folder and the thread on Egypt. (Which I have done above)

Good question but I am not sure given the pandemonium currently.

Thanks,

Bentley


message 15: by André, Honorary Contributor - EMERITUS - Music (new)

André (andrh) | 2847 comments Mod
Sridhar:

Hi,
This is an small idea that occurred to me while reading news today. Our group members are well read in history. Wouldnt it be great if all of us cou..."


Hi Sridhar,

I'm not sure if I get you right, but isn't everybody always making comments based on his or hers (historical/political/geographical etc.) knowledge...

As to your NAM suggestion/theory, I personally think it's a little early to start thinking and discussing a NAM revival simply because I am not yet able to see a clear line where Egypt is/might be heading or would want to go.
Until they do know I prefer to spend my time with the news or history rather than discuss vague theories.
But that's just me.

If somehow I misunderstood your idea let me know.
Best wishes,
André


message 16: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
Here is an odd story:

Probe of violence, mass escapes from Egypt prisons
(AP) – 1 hour ago


http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/a...

Source: Associated Press


message 17: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
This was the President's speech on the Middle East in May of this year at the State Department.

http://thelede.blogs.nytimes.com/2011...


message 18: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
The Guardian: News from Egypt

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/egypt


message 19: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Oct 26, 2011 01:52AM) (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
Viewpoint: Egypt's Copts must not submit to grief

Source: BBC News

Earlier this month Egypt saw some of the worst religious violence in decades. Twenty-five people were killed in clashes between Egyptian security forces and mainly Coptic Christian demonstrators protesting against an attack on a church.

Here Yousef Sidhoum, editor of the Coptic newspaper al-Watani, argues that the situation for Egypt's Copts has worsened following the country's revolution, but that the Copts can still play a crucial role in building a liberal, civil state.

Since the start of Egypt's revolution on 25 January, the world has watched the country's attempts to transform itself from a dictatorship to a democracy with a considerable degree of admiration and respect.

To tell the truth, Egyptians of my age group - I am 62 years old - never imagined that their fellow citizens could successfully revolt against a corrupt regime backed by fierce security services and the military.

But our youth did it and proved that we had mistakenly underestimated their determination to change their harsh fate.

During the uprising, all Egyptians flocked to Tahrir Square calling for reforms to bring social justice, more jobs and the cancellation of forged parliamentary elections. Muslims and Christians were bound by the same challenges and aspirations.

In the square a strong, unprecedented bond of national solidarity was forged. This amazing bond moved the hearts and souls of Egyptians all over the country - little wonder, as previously it had been absent in daily life except when Egypt played in international football matches.

'Discriminatory tide'

As a Coptic Christian, deep down in my heart there lies a wound that does not heal. It has festered over more than three decades as the grievances of Egypt's Copts have mounted.

In the 1970s, our good-natured, amicable Egyptian character began to change. Copts started to feel that they were rejected, marginalised, and denied their full citizenship rights both by the state and their Muslim fellow citizens, merely because of their religious denomination.

A strong wave of fanatic, fundamentalist Islam invaded our country, a vicious, discriminatory tide that flooded state bodies, official establishments and educational institutions and affected Muslim clergy. It resulted in legislative inequalities and selective rules that had an Islamic flavour and meant Copts were treated as second-class citizens.

At the top of the list of Coptic complaints is the restriction on the right to build and maintain churches. The difficulties begin with acquiring a site and continue through the entire process.

National security police have the right to reject any application or suspend approvals for years without being held to account. A new church also requires a presidential decree, while repairs need a governor's approval. The same restrictions do not apply to mosques.

This sends a signal to Muslim fanatics that the state does not mind harassing Christians. It fuels negative sentiments and helps trigger attacks by mobs against existing or newly built churches.

These are often accompanied by general violence against Copts, looting and burning of their property and threats to their lives.

Local authorities often turn a deaf ear and blind eye to these authorities and do not enforce the rule of law.

Remainder of article:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middl...


message 20: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Oct 26, 2011 01:58AM) (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
Egypt takes first step towards elections

Video on youtube:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e3O1X0...

Source: AlJazeeraEnglish


message 21: by André, Honorary Contributor - EMERITUS - Music (new)

André (andrh) | 2847 comments Mod
Bentley wrote: "Viewpoint..."

Fanatics always pose a problem, no matter what color, religion, political viewpoint etc.etc.
It seems the local governments always had their problems trying to keep the different groups from fighting/killing each other, be it the Pharaohs, the Romans, and practically all that came after that...


message 22: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
Yes, and it still obviously is happening with the Copts. Anybody different seems to pose a threat for folks.


message 23: by André, Honorary Contributor - EMERITUS - Music (last edited Oct 26, 2011 02:28AM) (new)

André (andrh) | 2847 comments Mod
Being different is what makes us human - how hard can it be to understand that?
I'm sure nobody would want to end up being a copy of someone else - just imagine the world filled with identical clones...

We'd end up nodding all the time - and getting nothing done (smile)


message 24: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Oct 26, 2011 03:06AM) (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
Books on the Copts:

Among the Copts by John H. Watson by John H. Watson

Coptic Life in Egypt by Claudia Yvonne Wiens by Claudia Yvonne Wiens

Here is a website which has some information: (I should probably say that I am not endorsing its validity - just citing a source that was listed)

http://www.coptic.net/CopticWeb/


message 25: by André, Honorary Contributor - EMERITUS - Music (new)

André (andrh) | 2847 comments Mod
Oh my, when I read "defendants of the Christian Faith" all I can say, here we go again...


message 26: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Oct 26, 2011 03:07AM) (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
André wrote: "Oh my, when I read "defendants of the Christian Faith" all I can say, here we go again..."

Yes, some of the sites seem very slanted; I list them anyway and let folks make their own determinations.


message 27: by André, Honorary Contributor - EMERITUS - Music (last edited Oct 26, 2011 03:35AM) (new)

André (andrh) | 2847 comments Mod
Bentley wrote: "André wrote: "Oh my, when I read "defendants of the Christian Faith" all I can say, here we go again..."

Yes, some of the sites seem very slanted..."


I know - it's just that with slants like these they should not wonder the others start/won't stop going at them with more of the same.
I never understand why people thinking themselves Christians find it so very hard to follow some of Christ's simplest ideas.


message 28: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
Most religious sites seem to have this bent; I am sure you have noticed. I belong to an organized religion myself so I can understand folks who have faith but are tolerant of others who feel or believe differently. Unfortunately, that is not how all religions are or sites are across the board. Many seem to profess too much and too aggressively; but I cannot fault them for that if they are also tolerant and respectful of others who believe differently or not. Like I said, I let everybody decide for themselves. But I understand your perspective for sure.


message 29: by André, Honorary Contributor - EMERITUS - Music (new)

André (andrh) | 2847 comments Mod
Bentley wrote: "Most religious sites seem to have this bent; I am sure you have noticed. I belong to an organized religion myself so I can understand folks who have faith but are tolerant of others who feel or b..."

As I can see yours. I have no problem whatsoever with people who have faith (I'm Christian myself though not a member of any church) - I just have a problem with people thinking they need to "defend" theirs. Especially in this case where the Copts know very well that both sides suffer from fanaticism. Defending and/or fighting religion I believe has nothing to do with what Christ preached.


message 30: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
Very true Andre. I cannot agree more. I doubt those are the tenets that he would preach.


message 31: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
Egyptian authorities are 'attacking human rights'

Concern has intensified after the offices of a number of pro-democracy and human rights groups were raided by Egyptian security forces.

Heba Morayef, from the organisation Human Rights Watch in Cairo, claims the net effect of the authorities' action has been to target human rights defenders.

See video:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-16360905

Note:

It appears that these organizations are being investigated because they have been critical of the government and the military.


message 32: by M. (new)

M. Kirollos (mskirollos) I've just noticed this thread in the group, I hope I can be of any help providing reports and insights specially that I'm an Egyptian with a Coptic Christian upbringing and I'm currently in Egypt. It might help to present another perspective and how we, Egyptians, view the influence of the west and USA in particular.

I've always found it very interesting to read history from different perspectives, it enriches and deepens the view and the understanding of the historic events. An example of which are reading about the "Reconquista" and the crusades from both the western and the eastern writers, and some events in the Coptic history.


message 33: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Jan 18, 2012 12:53AM) (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
Mina, this thread is here to discuss news items, etc that are being published about Egypt. We are not here to propose specific viewpoints one way or the other. And of course this is not a thread about animosities toward the West, the US, Britain or any other country for that matter or vice versa. Because of the unrest in the region, this thread was set up to discuss that unrest.

But if there is an article or post you want to respectfully comment or post about; then of course we are interested in your perspective as always. It is great to hear from folks who are in Egypt as well.


message 34: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
Egypt revolutionaries seek to retake initiative

By Tom Perry

CAIRO (Reuters) - Pro-democracy activists marching through the crowded streets of Cairo last week were met with smiles and laughter from some, but also suspicion and hostility. Setting out, they had expected trouble, and maybe even violence.

Not everyone in this working class neighborhood of Imbaba liked their chants, and when they stopped outside a mosque to screen a film critical of the military council, one angry local resident forced them to move on.

It's a scene that illustrates just one of the problems facing Egypt's pro-democracy groups as they try to rally support for a campaign against military rulers they believe are standing in the way of promised change.

Though Egypt has just held its most free elections in six decades, political reforms in the country of 80 million have fallen far short of the overhaul sought by the young reformists who occupied Tahrir Square on January 25, 2011, precipitating the end of Hosni Mubarak's rule.

Hardly represented at all in a new parliament dominated by Islamists, those activists now find themselves sidelined and fighting to salvage a reputation they say has been damaged by media loyal to the state, which has cast them as foreign-backed troublemakers.

"We must present the revolution's real message because the official media is delivering misinformation," said Omar Almasry, a blogger who took part in the march.

"People power made the revolution a success. Now we are missing it," said Almasry, an independent liberal, who left his camera at home in anticipation of trouble.

Watching the procession from a bus stop, Mohammed Hussein expressed the skepticism felt by those Egyptians who are more concerned with making a living than further upheaval.

"They want revolution, revolution, revolution. But then what?" said the 42-year-old school teacher. "There must be someone behind them."
The sentiment reflects the challenge facing the groups which set off the anti-Mubarak uprising a year ago as they try to bring people back into the street.

"The youth movement has a long way to go in reclaiming the revolution," said political analyst Mohamed Soffar.

RECLAIMING THE REVOLUTION

While many Egyptians have tired of endless protests, refocused their attention on their livelihoods and left the military council to its business, among the activists, distrust of the generals has only grown with time.

They doubt the armed forces will meet its promise to fully hand power to civilian rule by the end of June and are concerned the military rulers are trying to co-opt the revolution for their own ends.

"We went into the revolution for democracy, freedom and social justice," said Saeed Abu el-Alaa, a 28-year-old leader of the Youth Socialist Alliance, one of the groups pressing for deeper and faster reform.

"The democracy we are living is superficial and false."

Human rights group Amnesty International has faulted the generals for a "a catalogue of abuses that was in some aspects worse than under Hosni Mubarak," including violent suppression of protests and a surge in military trials.

Headed by Field Marshal Mohamed Hussein Tantawi, Mubarak's defense minister for two decades, the military council has defended its role in the post-Mubarak Egypt, portraying itself as the guardian of the revolution.

"If there is pent-up frustration between some youth and the armed forces, then it must be eradicated," said Major General Ismail Etman, a member of the ruling Supreme Council of the Armed Forces, addressing the youth complaints.

The newly elected Muslim Brotherhood, which was slow to back the uprising, is cooperating with the military for now, fuelling suspicions it might agree to a power-sharing deal, although it remains publicly committed to democratic reforms.

Both the Brotherhood and the military have called for celebrations on January 25, setting them at odds with youth groups who want the day to be an occasion for mass protest.

"I call for another revolution," said Ahmed Harara, a 31-year-old who was blinded while taking part in the protests last year. "It will take four or five years at least until we get rid of this regime."

Even without the overt support of the well-organized Brotherhood, leading activists say they are better placed today than they were a year ago to bring people into the streets.

STRONGER THAN A YEAR AGO

Ahmed Maher, a founder of the prominent April 6 movement, dismisses any suggestion that the youth groups are floundering.
April 6, for example, now has 20,000 committed activists across Egypt, seven times its size when it helped launch the uprising, the bespectacled 31-year-old civil engineer said.

"Whoever talks about an end to the role of the square is deluded," said Maher, speaking at a sidestreet cafe where Cairenes meet to talk politics.

The activists say they are learning from their mistakes and are seeking to address criticism of their failure to join forces with like-minded groups and to build grassroots support.

Organisation is improving, said Sally Touma, a leader of the Revolutionary Youth Coalition, set up last year after the uprising erupted. "You have to do some self-reflection on the mistakes that were made," she said.

"We have to organize people in groups so the revolution is in every neighborhood," she said, speaking while taking part in the Imbaba protest.

Part of a campaign called "Liars," the march was one of some 300 events held since December aimed at highlighting what the activists call the military council's dishonesty.

The rally was itself the result of closer coordination between nascent political groups with the same aims.

The night before, representatives of five groups gathered in a cramped office for the third time in a month. Packed into a smoky room, the attendees voted on "The Revolution Continues Movement" as a new umbrella name for their alliance.

"There's no need for each group to work on its own," said Abu el-Alaa, the socialist youth leader who was attending the meeting. "Our main aim is organization, organization, organization to preserve our existence and our revolution."

But he agreed the revolutionaries needed to urgently address their image problem to counter what he described as the "theft of the revolution."

"We are lacking popular support, despite the fact we are stronger."
(Additional reporting by Marwa Awad; Editing by Sonya Hepinstall)


message 35: by M. (new)

M. Kirollos (mskirollos) Bentley wrote: "Mina, this thread is here to discuss news items, etc that are being published about Egypt. We are not here to propose specific viewpoints one way or the other. And of course this is not a thread..."

Well, Bentley, either you misunderstood what I wrote or it was a poor choice of words from my side. I think even the news reports can be and usually are constructed and formulated in a way to influence one view of a given subject. Anyway, good luck with the thread and the group.


message 36: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
Mina, I am not sure what you mean. If you would like to comment on a news story, please feel free to do so. Every group member has the ability to comment and discuss. However, it is always best to avoid emotional discussions which are not respectful or civil. I do not mean that in any way that this is the case with you; because of course I have no reason to believe that this would occur. We are just reading the news articles and discussing them (nothing more..nothing less).

We do not have any political agenda here; nor does anybody here not want the best for Egypt and your countrymen.

Please feel free to comment; if your comments are inappropriate - you will be told and the comments would be deleted. I cannot fathom what you have in mind so I really cannot comment on comments that you have not made. This thread is however about Egypt and not the West or the USA.


message 37: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Jan 19, 2012 03:25PM) (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
ABC News:

Egypt Tourism Receipts Slip Nearly 30 Pct in 2011

Revenues from Egypt's vital tourism sector plunged almost 30 percent last year, the government said Thursday, as unrest following the ouster of former President Hosni Mubarak stunted economic growth and forced the country to turn to the International Monetary Fund for help.

The decline in revenues caused by near-daily protests and strikes underscores the challenges as Egypt's military rulers and the interim government plot a course toward handing over power to an elected civilian administration.

Remainder of article:

http://abcnews.go.com/Business/wireSt...

Youtube Video on situation:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YA92QO...


message 38: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Jan 19, 2012 03:33PM) (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
In Egypt's New Parliament, Women Will Be Scarce
by LOURDES GARCIA-NAVARRO


Source: NPR

"We did a survey that was composed of only one question. Would you accept to see your president as a woman? One hundred percent of them said 'no.' This is what people think, it's OK to have democracy, but women are not in the equation of democracy."
- Dalia Ziada, female Egyptian activist who ran for parliament

In Egypt's recent parliamentary elections, the first since Hosni Mubarak's ouster and the fairest in the country's history, Islamists won big.

And one group suffered a shocking disappointment — women.

Although the final numbers haven't been announced, it appears there will be only about eight women out of the 508 seats – or less than 2 percent.

"I think it's a disastrous parliament, how this can represent a society?" said Dalia Abdel Hamid, the gender officer at the Egyptian Initiative for Human Rights. "After the revolution everyone wanted to be represented and to have their voices heard but ... women are just being marginalized by all the parties."

It's been almost a year since Egypt's revolution, and there's a feeling now that the heady days when men and women stood together in Cairo's Tahrir Square are long gone.

In many cases, nascent democracies have a quota system to ensure that all groups get at least some level of representation. But in Egypt, a quota for women was viewed with suspicion. Many thought it might be used, as it was in Mubarak's time, to stack the parliament unfairly.

Also, the women who ran on party lists were placed far down on those lists, meaning they had virtually no chance of getting into office. And that was true of all parties, Islamist as well as liberal.

"It really hurts so much when the same people you were with in that square that day, who are fighting against the regime ... are now turning against you," says Dalia Ziada, an activist who ran for parliament. "It's like betrayal, betrayal from our companions."

Remainder of article:

http://www.npr.org/2012/01/19/1454683...

Link to audio:

There is a very interesting audio on the NPR page.


message 39: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Jan 19, 2012 07:13PM) (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
The Struggle for Egypt
From Nasser to Tahrir Square

Author: Steven A. Cook, Hasib J. Sabbagh Senior Fellow for Middle Eastern Studies

Overview

The recent revolution in Egypt has shaken the Arab world to its roots. The most populous Arab country and the historical center of Arab intellectual life, Egypt is a linchpin of the United States' Middle East strategy, traditionally receiving more aid than any nation except Israel. This is not the first time that the world has turned its gaze to Egypt, however. A half-century ago, Egypt under Nasser became the putative leader of the Arab world and a beacon for all developing nations. Yet in the decades prior to the 2011 revolution, it was ruled over by a sclerotic regime plagued by nepotism and corruption. During that time, its economy declined into near shambles, a severely overpopulated Cairo fell into disrepair, and it produced scores of violent Islamic extremists such as Ayman al-Zawahiri and Mohammed Atta.

In The Struggle for Egypt, Steven Cook--a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations--explains how this parlous state of affairs came to be, why the revolution occurred, and where Egypt might be headed next. A sweeping account of Egypt in the modern era, it incisively chronicles all of the nation's central historical episodes: the decline of British rule, the rise of Nasser and his quest to become a pan-Arab leader, Egypt's decision to make peace with Israel and ally with the United States, the assassination of Sadat, the emergence of the Muslim Brotherhood, and--finally--the demonstrations that convulsed Tahrir Square and overthrew an entrenched regime.

Throughout Egypt's history, there has been an intense debate to define what Egypt is, what it stands for, and its relation to the world. Egyptians now have an opportunity to finally answer these questions. Doing so in a way that appeals to the vast majority of Egyptians, Cook notes, will be difficult but ultimately necessary if Egypt is to become an economically dynamic and politically vibrant society.

The Struggle for Egypt From Nasser to Tahrir Square by Steven A. Cook by Steven A. Cook


message 40: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
Pretty bad for those folks who need this treatment:

Egypt Eyed as Possible Source of Fake Avastin

LONDON—Authorities are investigating whether counterfeit packs of the cancer drug Avastin found on the U.S. market came from an Egyptian supplier, according to the U.K.'s medical regulator, amid a global effort to track the origins of the fake product that has spooked cancer doctors and patients.

One of the European wholesalers involved in trading the fake product, meanwhile, said it had been unaware that the drug wasn't real, and added that it was beefing up its system for checking the quality of the medicines it trades.

The wholesaler, Denmark's CareMed ApS, said it was making the changes on the orders of Denmark's medical regulator. CareMed added that it has heard reports that the fake medicine might have originated in Egypt or Turkey.

Avastin's maker, Roche Holding AG, said this week it had warned doctors, hospitals and patient groups that a counterfeit version of the medicine has been found in the U.S. It isn't clear how much of the counterfeit product was distributed in the U.S. or whether it has caused any harm. Roche's U.S. unit, Genentech, says it doesn't know whether any patients were given the fake drug.

The Food and Drug Administration is investigating, and has sent letters to 19 medical practices, mostly in California, but also in Texas and Illinois, that the agency says buys unapproved cancer medicines and might have bought the counterfeit Avastin.

The appearance of counterfeit Avastin highlights a rising threat: fakes of costly injectable therapies, rather than simple pills such as Viagra. The FDA recently alerted doctors and other health-care providers about the risk of "non-FDA-approved injectable cancer medications," including unauthorized versions of Herceptin, Rituxan and Neupogen, that were being marketed and sold to clinics and "most likely were administered to patients."

The counterfeit Avastin traveled through wholesalers in Switzerland, Denmark and the U.K. before landing in the U.S., according to medical regulators and CareMed. But regulators are still trying to determine where the fake drug was originally produced.

Remainder of article:

Source: Wall Street Journal

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001...


message 41: by Bea (last edited Apr 21, 2012 08:31PM) (new)

Bea | 1830 comments IMF sees "good progress" on loan deal for Egypt
April 20, 2012 - Reuters

The International Monetary Fund said on Friday that Egypt's government and political partners have made good progress in agreeing on the content of economic measures that will make up an IMF funding program for the country.

"We feel there is some progress in terms of getting a commitment and broad buy-in to the objectives and the measures" of a program, including among those who are likely to be involved in implementing it after the elections, said IMF Director for the Middle East Masood Ahmed.

Egypt and the IMF are in discussions on a $3.2 billion loan program, which had been opposed by the powerful Muslim Brotherhood's Freedom and Justice Party. But the FJP now appears to be on board.

The delay in sealing the deal, which the government had hoped to secure in March, has brought the country closer to a fiscal crisis that could lead to a jump in consumer prices and interest rates, a big currency devaluation and huge pressure on banks.

The IMF is insisting that any agreement on financing is backed by Egypt's government and political partners ahead of June elections. This would ensure the deal would outlast the political transition following the polls.

Ahmed said the IMF agreed with Egypt's estimated financing needs of $10 billion to $12 billion, part of it funded by the IMF and the rest by donors.

Remainder of article: http://news.yahoo.com/imf-sees-good-p...

Also on April 20, The Christian Science Monitor published an interesting piece entitled Egypt's dire economy looms over elections

Tagline: "Egypt's foreign reserves have tumbled to $15 billion from $36 billion, jeopardizing the government's ability to meet the people's needs. The future is about a lot more than voting."

http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Middle...

I feel sorry for the ordinary Egyptians. They still are not getting their democracy and austerity measures will put further pressure on the fragile process toward getting there. On the other hand, this was all a very predictable result of the Arab spring IMO. Tourism revenues must have fallen through the floor.


To be released April 24, 2012: The Battle For The Arab Spring: Revolution, Counter Revolution And The Making Of A New Era (wrong cover art on link page) by Tarek Osman (no photo)

Osman is the author of
The Battle For The Arab Spring Revolution, Counter Revolution And The Making Of A New Era by Tarek Osman which is apparently not listed separately on Goodreads.


message 42: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Apr 21, 2012 02:52PM) (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
There is a old saying which goes - be careful of what you wish for - you may get it. On one hand there is the faction that wants to stay in the past with austere fanatical viewpoints; they want to bring that back while the more moderate folks just want to be happy, successful and be free of tyranny. Neither side seems happy now that Mubarak is gone; it is hard to lead a country and make things work. I am not sure that they really know how to get what they want and what that entails.


message 43: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
Turkey and Egypt Seek Alliance Amid Region’s Upheaval
By TIM ARANGO
Published: October 18, 2012


Source: New York Times

ISTANBUL — With war on Turkey’s borders, and political and economic troubles in Egypt, the two countries have turned to each other for support, looking to build an alliance that could represent a significant geopolitical shift in the Middle East prompted by the Arab Spring, uniting two countries with regional ambitions each headed by parties with roots in political Islam.

Egypt and Turkey are considering plans to lift visa restrictions and recently completed joint naval exercises in the Mediterranean Sea. Turkey has offered a host of measures to bolster Egypt’s economy, including a $2 billion aid package. There is even talk of Turkey’s helping Egypt to restore its Ottoman-era buildings. A wider-ranging partnership is expected to be announced in the coming weeks when the Turkish prime minister, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, whose party shares an Islamist pedigree with Egypt’s leadership, goes to Cairo.

Remainder of article:

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/10/19/wor...


message 44: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
Egypt's revolution fails to reform police



Riot policemen beat a protester opposing Egyptian President Mohamed Mursi during clashes along Qasr Al Nil bridge, which leads to Tahrir Square in Cairo, in this January 28, 2013 file photo. A protest over Egypt's ineffective and heavy-handed police force two years ago started the uprising that toppled President Hosni Mubarak and inspired revolts throughout the Arab world. REUTERS/Amr Abdallah Dalsh/Files

http://www.iol.co.za/news/africa/egyp...

Source: IOL News


message 45: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

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Dreams and Shadows: The Future of the Middle East

Dreams and Shadows The Future of the Middle East by Robin Wright by Robin Wright (no photo)

Synopsis:

A magnificent reckoning with the extraordinary changes engulfing the Middle East, by one of our greatest reporters on the region

Robin Wright first landed in the Middle East on October 6, 1973, the day the fourth Middle East war erupted. She has covered every country and most major crises in the region since then, through to the rise of Al-Qaeda and the U.S. invasion of Iraq.

For all the drama of the past, however, the region's most decisive traumas are unfolding today as the Middle East struggles to deal with trends that have already reshaped the rest of the world. And for all the darkness, there is also hope.

Some of the emerging trends give cause for greater optimism about the future of the Middle East than at any time since the first Arab-Israeli War in 1948.

Dreams and Shadows is an extraordinary tour d'horizon of the new Middle East, with on-the-ground reportage of the ideas and movements driving change across the region-and the obstacles they confront.

Through the powerful storytelling for which the author is famous, Dreams and Shadows ties together the players and events in Iraq, Iran, Egypt, Syria, Lebanon, Morocco, Turkey, the Gulf states, and the Palestinian territories into a coherent vision of what lies ahead.

A marvelous field report from the center of the storm, the book is animated by the characters whose stories give the region's transformation its human immediacy and urgency. It is also rich with the history that brought us to this point. It is a masterpiece of the reporter's art and a work of profound and enduring insight.


message 46: by Peter (new)

Peter Flom I'm glad someone is optimistic!

The latest news from the Middle East doesn't cheer me at all. Syria - an obvious balagan (to use a word that is used in Israel for "a really totally messed up situation").

Egypt - Morsi becoming more and more dictatorial

Saudi Arabia - still struggling to enter the 20th century.

Yemen - Close to a failed state

etc

and

Israel - I love Israel, I lived there for 3 years, but I think they are headed in completely the wrong direction with Bibi.


message 47: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Apr 05, 2013 03:18PM) (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
Peter, being that I am already down about the refugee situation (20% of the nation) and the UN saying that they are running out of money to take care of the refugees they have and they are still streaming across the borders, I was sort of looking for a pick me up. Guess not. (smile)

When some of these folks taste power - they do anything to keep it.

Saudi Arabia - they finally are allowing women to ride bicycles but only for recreation and a father, brother or spouse must be with them and not to get to work. Oh dear.

Poor Yemen - I agree.

And Israel - I do not know what they think they are going to accomplish with more belligerence - it is a sad state of affairs and I feel bad that the Israelis cannot live in peace without a missile or rocket hitting their house or worse. Everyone who has been to Israel loves it and I know it is a tough situation for the Israelis; but I have to agree that Bibi's style seems aggressive and lacking empathy. Is that what you are referring to?

Well the review was probably written before this most recent debacle and I guess publishers try to be optimistic.

The reviews of books are always more optimistic than the news.


message 48: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
East is West - published in 1945 originally

East Is West by Freya Stark Freya Stark Freya Stark

Synopsis:

Once described as "a traveler of genius" Dame Freya Stark's vivid account of journeys in Persia, Arabia and the Near East opened up new vistas for a wide readership. Long before it was fashionable to be a solo traveler, much less a woman alone, she roamed the world.

EAST IS WEST is the story of her war-time experiences in Egypt, Palestine and Syria. Stark tells her story with the freedom and independence of an intrepid traveler and with the authority of an official of the British Diplomatic Corps.

"That she so triumphantly holds our attention and makes us long for more is due to her sensibilty, her courage, her honesty, and above all, to her gift that must leave all other travel writers desperate with envy." (The Listener)


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Eothen - Travel in the East

Eothen by Alexander William Kinglake by Alexander William Kinglake

One of Winston Churchill's favorites

Synopsis:

A solitary Western traveler in the Middle East in 1834, this is an extraordinary work of travel writing that is more about the author's internal journey than it is about monuments and museums, one that replicates the personal experience of travel and how it changes who we are. Kinglake's intimate, conversational style and his sense of humor and irony lend Eothen-the title means "from the early dawn" or "from the East"-an air that still feels as fresh and original in the 21st century as it must have when it was first published in 1844.

This delightful travelogue of a young Englishman's journey through the middle east, in 1835 has become a permanent classic. The authors personal observations of the characters he encounters, including Pashas, interpreters, camel merchants, slave-traders, magicians, Bedouins, governors, soldiers, Jews, monks, pilgrims, and even a famous expatriate stateswoman turned astrologist, are all amusing and give great insight into the Arab character.

Kinglake braved the plague, and numerous other ills in order to undertake these travels when transportation in the area was still quite difficult and dangerous, so many of his adventures are hair-raising as well as humorous.


message 50: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Apr 05, 2013 06:22PM) (new)

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Travels in Egypt and Nubia, Syria, and Asia Minor - During the Years 1817 and 1818

Travels in Egypt and Nubia, Syria, and the Holy Land Including a Journey Round the Dead Sea, and Through the Country East of the Jordan by Charles Leonard Irby by Charles Leonard Irby (no photo)

Synopsis:

Travels in Egypt and Nubia, Syria, and the Holy Land is a detailed journal from two commanders in the British Royal Navy, documenting their time in the Middle East during a "tour of the Continent."

Though the two captains, also relatives by marriage, had only intended on a short excursion, they extended their stay and explored the area for more than four years, from 1816 to 1820.

The result is an extensive and intricate study of Middle East culture and land. Included are sections on Egypt and Nubia, Syria, and Petra and the Dead Sea.

Entries are organized by date and include subjects such as, "Our Party and its Objects," "Crocodiles," "Visit to the Pyramids," "Convent on Mount Carmel," "Troubles with our Escort," and "Observations on the Character and Customs of the Arabs."

This entertaining and informative read will be of interest to historians and students of Middle Eastern culture.

The honorable Captain CHARLES LEONARD IRBY (1789-1845) was a captain in the British Royal Navy. He was married to Frances Mangles, daughter of John Mangles. He died at age 56 on December 3, 1845.

JAMES MANGLES (1786-1867) was a naval captain in the British Royal Navy. Throughout his travels, he collected plant specimens and seeds, developing a reputation as a botanist and explorer. He died November 18, 1867 in Fairfield, Exeter, England.


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