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on writing > What Scenes Are the Easiest to Write?

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message 1: by Gemma (new)

Gemma | 12 comments For me, fight scenes are not only the easiest, they're the most fun as well. The cause/effect, action/reaction bits take a little more time to write in the first place, but they take the least effort.


message 2: by Joy (new)

Joy Alari (JoyAlari) | 1 comments totally agree with you gemma especially when its verbal, getting those words out is exhilarating for me.


message 3: by Andrea (new)

Andrea (andreakhost) The ones you've been looking forward to writing the entire book.


message 4: by Amanda (new)

Amanda M. Lyons (amandamlyons) For me it's actually the dialogue and interaction bits that are easier. I've had to spend the last few years really focusing on how to improve my action sequences because they were rushed through and it showed :(.

I'm not even sure why the action was harder. Maybe because i've never had to deal with that sort of sequence in real life?


message 5: by Liz (new)

Liz Fichera (lizfichera) I love writing action scenes, but I would have to say that no scene is easy to write. It might look easy after the third or fourth draft, but it's never easy. :-)


message 6: by Tom (new)

Tom Bensley (bensley56) | 2 comments Certainly depends on the individual and what they enjoy most.
Personally, when I write scenes involving the character having a mental breakdown or drastic change in mood/revelation, the words just pour out of me.
Then I look back and realise I need to re write the hell out of it, of course.
On the note of action scenes, mine always feel forced and awkward, so I tend to stay away if I can.
Writing realistic, important and interesting dialogue can be especially difficult though.


message 7: by Amanda (new)

Amanda M. Lyons (amandamlyons) Bensley56 wrote: "Certainly depends on the individual and what they enjoy most.
Personally, when I write scenes involving the character having a mental breakdown or drastic change in mood/revelation, the words just..."


Bensley56 there are some writing exercises online designed to help with action sequences and boosting your ability to write them. Try looking up "action writing practice exercise" and see what comes up. I hope that helps you. I know it allowed me to focus on them better.


message 8: by Grace (new)

Grace (themadmangoavenger) | 10 comments I find all of it difficult to write currently. When I'm just getting started, I find tension building scenes are the easiest though. I am good at seeing things from a remote view and emphasising the exciting bits.


message 9: by M.L. (last edited Feb 01, 2011 04:01PM) (new)

M.L. Bushman | 144 comments A lot of writers have trouble with action scenes. They want to draw it out, or feel they need to draw it out, when simple and to the point is the best.

Some of the best action scene writers keep it simple.

He raised his hand to slap her for the umpteenth time and she shot him. He bled all over the linoleum before he died.

The idea is not to milk it for all it's worth because then it won't be worth much.

It's action. Simple, to the point.

He took a fist to the jaw and levied a right hook to the temple that sent his attacker crashing to the floor.

The knife gleamed in the moonlight. He had her cornered. He never heard the shot from the derringer for the blow to the chest that knocked him down.

In all of the above examples, you know what happened, you know something about the characters, and you move on. Action is just that: action. Less wordiness is more.


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