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GENERAL BOOK DISCUSSIONS > worst book you read

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message 1: by Brenda (new)

Brenda  (readingfan654) | 3 comments what book was boring for you ? I would say
* mODLES DONT EAT ....


message 2: by Polkweed (new)

Polkweed | 25 comments just boring?
Atlas Shrugged


message 3: by Sam (new)

Sam (ecowitch) | 14 comments Other than some of the more popular titles like the Twilight Saga (yes I read them, why I'm not quite sure) I haven't really found many books boring, apart from Gone With The Wind, that was really not for me.


message 4: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 485 comments Polkweed wrote: "just boring?
Atlas Shrugged"


Did you actually manage to finish it? My parents tried to get me to read this in high school, but after a few chapters, I gave up (it also did not help that my parents told me to read this book to get rid of my socialism).


message 5: by Patricia (new)

Patricia I agree with Atlas Shrugged and The Fountainhead as well. I found both books a little dry and unreadable.


message 6: by Shay (new)

Shay | 66 comments Patricia wrote: "I agree with Atlas Shrugged and The Fountainhead as well. I found both books a little dry and unreadable."

I know it's an odd comparison, but one of the (many) reasons I despise Ayn Rand is the same reason I dislike Twilight. The followers- it seems like most of the people, when I was young, who liked The Fountainhead were obnoxious, pretentious, idiots. (I think you can only truly appreciate Ayn Rand during that flash of youthful egoism.) Sort of like Twilight, not actually the worst books ever, but the people who read it are sometimes "too much".


message 7: by Julie (new)

Julie S. That is a strange comparison, but Shay, I see what you mean. Over-zealous fans do get annoying to listen to after a while.


message 8: by Katie (new)

Katie (rosepixie) | 6 comments Are you looking for most boring or worst? They aren't necessarily the same thing.


message 9: by Alexis (new)

Alexis Patterson (alexispayne99aolcom) | 2 comments Julie wrote: "That is a strange comparison, but Shay, I see what you mean. Over-zealous fans do get annoying to listen to after a while."

I agree. And sometimes it's hard to keep in touch with them.


message 10: by Christine (new)

Christine (christinesey) Shay wrote: "Patricia wrote: "I agree with Atlas Shrugged and The Fountainhead as well. I found both books a little dry and unreadable."

I know it's an odd comparison, but one of the (many) reasons I despise A..."


You said it better than I ever could.


message 11: by Juliette (new)

Juliette | 1 comments I found White Noise by Don DeLillo to be the most boring book I had ever read. It may have been that I had high expectations for it, but I found the characters lacked in anything I would care about and the storyline uninteresting.
But boring and worst are two different things.


message 12: by Pandora (new)

Pandora  | 68 comments I like that comparsion Shay of Twilight and Atlas Shrugged. Never read Twiligh but, I did try to read Atlas Shrugged. I got so bored with it that I ended up skip reading just to find out if the book was going to end like I thought it would.

On Gone With the Wind never got around to reading the book. The last time though I watched the movie I couldn't believe how bad it was. It was too one sided and I just couldn't care less about the people.

Have to agree even though I was part of the Treker crowd that over zealous fans can go to far. Though I was a Treker it wasn't to the point of having over 500 items of Star Trek stuff like the runner up for greatest trek fan had.

Atlas Shrugged would have to be my vote for most boaring since I had to skip read it to finish it. For just plain bad though I would have to add The Historian. I found it not only boaring but, also illogical. The idea was Vlad Dracula was the first vampire. Only problem he was beheaded and the story never explained away this problem.

On Atlas Shurgged has anyone ever heard of The Girl Who Owned a City? It is a children's book based on Ayn Rand's ideas which should tell you how bad the story is.


message 13: by Ricky (new)

Ricky Barnes (naumadd) | 7 comments On the subject of "boring", I'd have to say that what meaning you find in a work - or don't find - is primarily up to you. Paradoxically, I have read a number of works that I initially found immensely boring only to return to them later to find great meaning in the exact same pages. So too in the reverse. The words didn't change - I did. "Boring" is a choice the reader makes. The author isn't responsible for it.


message 14: by Brett (new)

Brett (battlinjack) | 1 comments Ricky wrote: "On the subject of "boring", I'd have to say that what meaning you find in a work - or don't find - is primarily up to you. Paradoxically, I have read a number of works that I initially found immens..."

Great point Ricky.
I whole-heartedly agree. How a book 'reads' to you, the reader, is purely subjective and changes as you change.
A book I get excited about may bore you to tears and vice versa. And, as you mention, a book that bores me know may be the most exciting book ever some time down the road.

Our tastes change, sometimes frequently! I tend to read a variety of genres in cycles. I will read Fantasy until one day it's simply not interesting and I will change to Horror or Science Fiction or whatever.
Of course, in all reality, I am usually reading a half dozen books at the same time depending on where I am and my current interest.


message 15: by Julie (new)

Julie S. Your comments remind me of the saying, "There are no boring situations, just bored people."


message 16: by Polkweed (new)

Polkweed | 25 comments Julie wrote: "Your comments remind me of the saying, "There are no boring situations, just bored people.""

that saying never got stuck at the DMV.


message 17: by Samantha (new)

Samantha Leighanne (sleighanne) Polkweed wrote: "Julie wrote: "Your comments remind me of the saying, "There are no boring situations, just bored people.""

that saying never got stuck at the DMV."


That's so true hahaha


message 18: by Shay (new)

Shay | 66 comments Polkweed wrote: "Julie wrote: "Your comments remind me of the saying, "There are no boring situations, just bored people.""

that saying never got stuck at the DMV."


I've never waited more than 30 minutes at the DMV. I always pack a bunch of books and barely get to read more than a few pages.


message 19: by Julia (new)

Julia | 62 comments This year I read The Catcher in the Rye for a discussion at the library. I loved it when I was 15, but now, I hated that little self-absorbed twerp Holden. I know about the novel's importance and all that, but I didn't care, I didn't want to be around that narrator!


message 20: by Kelly H. (Maybedog), Big Kahuna, Ministry of Illicit Reading (last edited Jan 03, 2011 04:26AM) (new)

Kelly H. (Maybedog) (maybedog) | 623 comments Mod
I have little to add to this discussion. I agree with all of you. I especially disliked Catcher in the Rye *and* found it boring. I've found many many many books boring. If you mean worst, it's hard to say. I don't generally finish bad books. But I have to say I tried to read Twilight 3 times, the first before anyone had heard of it (because it takes place in Forks which is in my general geographical area and I've been to and enjoyed) and because I was into vampires back then. It was horrid. I also despised Infinite Jest. I can't even bear to read Ayn Rand.

Pandora Kat, I was one of those Trekkies who collected stuff but was never very zealous. I got rid of all of it a couple of years ago. I think it's funny that you use the word "Treker." I only thought hard-core ST fans used that word. :)


message 21: by Miri (new)

Miri I just read The Catcher in the Rye for the first time a few months ago, and I wasn't impressed, especially considering the number of people I know who've told me how incredible it is. Maybe you have to read it as a teenager to fully appreciate it?

I really hated Fight Club, by Chuck Palahniuk. Listened to it on audio and couldn't get past halfway.


message 22: by Meg (last edited Jan 06, 2011 09:40AM) (new)

Meg | 7 comments I read Catcher in the Rye (or tried to) without success in my 20's. In addition to not being a teenager, my opinion of the book was probably tarnished forever by it being the favored reading of Mark David Chapman. NOt Salinger's fault I know, but I cant hear the words "Catcher in the Rye" without thinking about it. I used to think I was the only beatles fan who felt that way but have found I am not.
I cant say its the worst book, because I still recognize its quality even as I dont enjoy it.

My candidate for the worst book I ever read was Seymour Hersh's Dark Side of Camelot....I dont mind reading about scandal in high places, much as I admire the Kennedy's I willingly admit their faults. But Hersh's book was so mean spirited and depressing (there is no good deed JFK did for which he cannot provide a negative ulterior motive.) I found myself wanting to take a show when I finished. I even gave the book away, something I almost never do with history books, even ones I disagree with....

I have never tried to read Ayn Rand, I figured life was too short....I have read the twilight books because my pretten daughter owns them, I wasnt that impressed but probably would have loved them at 11. Another set of books I was bored/disappointed by was Chronicles of Narnia....I read it after Lord Of the Rings looking for a similar experience and was not impressed (read his Sci-fi books in college and didnt like them eitherbut my daughter loves them and I just bought her the set.


message 23: by Pandora (new)

Pandora  | 68 comments I think the problem with Catcher in the Rye is that while it was something in the fifties by today's standards it not as shocking or as new. At least that was my thoughts after having to read in it High School.

I do also agree with Meg that as bad as fiction gets it is worse when non-fiction is wrong. I still have never forgiven James Cameron for his trashing of the Titanic and reducing a tragedy to a silly romance.


message 24: by Polkweed (new)

Polkweed | 25 comments Pandora Kat wrote: "I think the problem with Catcher in the Rye is that while it was something in the fifties by today's standards it not as shocking or as new. At least that was my thoughts after having to read in i..."

If you want to see a tragedy reduced to silly romance you should check out the animated Titanic movie they did a while back. It has a happy ending.


message 25: by Suz (new)

Suz You haven't specified fiction or non-fiction so I'll include both.

I agree with the general consensus of Atlas Shrugged, especially the monologue. A friend asked me to read it and I forced my way through the entire thing. When I was done I wasn't sure my friend and I were still friends anymore. I never read The Fountainhead. In fairness to Ms. Rand her shorter fiction works often conveyed her message without belaboring the point and with some measure of entertainment. Anthem comes to mind.

The Second Sex by Simone de Beauvoir belabored the point to the point of insanity.

Almost anything by Jean Paul Satre. I just can't stay awake through it.


message 26: by Dee (new)

Dee (austhokie) Wuthering Heights - I know it is considered a classic, but I wanted to kill myself...I was listening to it, vice reader since I have a 1+ commute each day, but it so depressing


message 27: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks | 485 comments Delicious Dee Challenge Addict wrote: "Wuthering Heights - I know it is considered a classic, but I wanted to kill myself...I was listening to it, vice reader since I have a 1+ commute each day, but it so depressing"

I never could understand why people enjoyed that book so much. I don't think I hated it as much as you did, but it certainly was not and is not a favourite (but, I think I gave it a high rating because it's a classic, I'm such a coward).


message 28: by jb (new)

jb Byrkit (jbbyrkit) LOL....I am very stingy with my 5 star ratings. Sometimes I even lower the rating later on if the book doesn't "stick" with me.


message 29: by J.L. (new)

J.L. I hate saying what is awful, but, I really didn't like The Windup Girl. To much forceful rape going on, just made me feel completely disgusting.


message 30: by Sam (new)

Sam (ecowitch) | 14 comments Delicious Dee Challenge Addict wrote: "Wuthering Heights - I know it is considered a classic, but I wanted to kill myself...I was listening to it, vice reader since I have a 1+ commute each day, but it so depressing"

I'm with you on that one, I got through it but then had to pick up a really upbeat cheery book straight after, just to recover!


message 31: by Alexis (new)

Alexis Patterson (alexispayne99aolcom) | 2 comments Brenda wrote: "what book was boring for you ? I would say
* mODLES DONT EAT ...."


Wut?


message 32: by Manybooks (last edited Feb 13, 2011 05:54AM) (new)

Manybooks | 485 comments Jaime wrote: "Anything by Jane Austen. I know most of you will disagree but every few years I try her again and I just can't stand the writing and nothing about any of the books make me want to keep reading."

Well, I would certainly disagree with that, but reading is such a personal experience and one person's favourite author is another person's least favourite author. And, that is especially true with writing style, particularly in books that are lengthy and involved. I love Jane Austen, and 18th Century satire, but 19th Century British authors, like the Brontës, George Eliot and Charles Dickens are not my favourites. Although I like them much better than Ayn Rand and some German authors like Adalbert Stifter and Robert Musil who just seem to engage in uninteresting verbosity.


message 33: by ♥Jenny♥ (new)

♥Jenny♥ The worst book that I've read is Blood and Chocolate this book shoul be banned, because it's just terrible.


message 34: by Dee (new)

Dee (austhokie) I dont mind austen, but I don't love her - I prefer Elizabeth Gaskell who was a few decades before her, she has a good satirical voice in her writing

Jaime wrote: "Anything by Jane Austen. I know most of you will disagree but every few years I try her again and I just can't stand the writing and nothing about any of the books make me want to keep reading."


message 35: by Elizabeth (new)

Elizabeth Herondale (shadowhunter1983) | 13 comments I'm sorry but the "Great Gatsby" I read it in high school and hated it. I also hated reading "The Giver" when I was in college, but I read it again a few months ago and liked it. So maybe I need to do that with the "Great Gatsby".


message 36: by Dee (new)

Dee (austhokie) i hated any book I "had" to read i nschool...I boycotted as much as possible and found cliff-notes if they were available...I should try re-reading Lord of the Flies now that i'm older and see whether I like it any better


message 37: by Elizabeth (new)

Elizabeth Herondale (shadowhunter1983) | 13 comments Yeah I think I was the same way, any book I had to read in school I hated, like "Beowulf" I hated that too. But also the problem with the books we "read" in high school we didn't really read them we watched the movie. I hated doing that.


message 38: by Samantha (last edited Feb 22, 2011 05:58PM) (new)

Samantha | 1 comments ♥Jenny♥ wrote: "The worst book that I've read is Blood and Chocolate this book shoul be banned, because it's just terrible."

what i liked that book but i hated the movie. did you see the movie first because that might explain it. the book that i hated the most would have to be Feed by M.T. Anderson not because of the writing but because i was forced to read it in school and i didnt like that the story showed little hope for the future. not to mention that i wanted to kick the people that did stupid things like cut down the last forest to make room for a oxygen factory. ugh


message 39: by Polkweed (new)

Polkweed | 25 comments Samantha wrote: "♥Jenny♥ wrote: "The worst book that I've read is Blood and Chocolate this book shoul be banned, because it's just terrible."

what i liked that book but i hated the movie. did you se..."


Someone else read Feed and hated it!?! I though I was the only one! I've read another book by the same author and just flat out can't stand how he writes. It's all about getting into the mind of an insecure, confused teenager and while that's all very edgy and realistic it's also very annoying because teenagers at their worst are very annoying. Now get off my lawn...


message 40: by Katrina (new)

Katrina | 5 comments I guess for me mine would be The Grapes of Wrath but in the lead would be Cold Sassy Tree, ugh....both horrible and both books I read in high school for required reading (Cold Sassy (Sophomore) and Grapes (Junior))....oh...I could also put Frankenstein (senior) in there...OMG....SOOOOO BORING! "Grapes" just got redundant, Cold Sassy was in just generally horrible and than Frankenstein made me want to never, ever read again, please come up with a different word then vehemently (which I swore was used in EVERY OTHER SENTENCE).

On the other hand, I enjoyed the "Twilight" books...they were suggested by someone who I know has a great taste in books...I downed them all in about a week (probably would have been faster if I didn't have school)...I don't count them as my favorite books and I don't look to read them OVER and OVER like the HPs, but for a quick bit of escapism that isn't overly rampant with gratuitous sex (most romance books BORE me) they are a nice little bit of fluff here and there to clear my mind for something a little stronger.


message 41: by Megan (new)

Megan I liked the Twilight books, too. They were really different, but good. I think that's why I liked them as much as I did---because they were so different than anything I had ever read.
But I LOVED "Grapes of Wrath!" It's one of my favorites! We read it this year in AP English. I thought I would not enjoy it very much but ended up loving it. That's okay that you don't care for it. Everyone has their own tastes in books. :)


message 42: by Katrina (new)

Katrina | 5 comments Megan wrote: "I liked the Twilight books, too. They were really different, but good. I think that's why I liked them as much as I did---because they were so different than anything I had ever read.
But I LOV..."

I probably was because it was one of my assigned summer reads for my junior year Honors English class...it was just the WRONG pace for summer time...though I am sure, if I even attempted to read it or anything by John Steinbeck today,I would probably be bored out of my gourd. Nothing happens for pretty much the whole book, then you have random chapters of randomness...I like more speed in my reads.


message 43: by She'Davia (new)

She'Davia Williams (redsoxocd) | 2 comments Jane Eyre tops the chart for me. I found it incredibly boring and the lack of emotion turned me off of the book. I had to read it for school. The line the killed me was

"Reader, I married him."

Like what was that! Could there be any less emotion???

Overall it was just a horrible book.


message 44: by Mark (new)

Mark McKenna (mark_mckenna) | 4 comments I could never get into "Moby Dick." I tried and failed twice. Maybe it's time to try again, now that I'm all grown up, ha.


message 45: by George (last edited Mar 30, 2011 10:23AM) (new)

George King (kinggeorge) | 15 comments As someone who taught English literature for 32 years, I would say that you might come back to a book that you hated in high school and try it again. I've done that myself and gained a new appreciation of the work. Gatsby falls into that category. Also, I've tackled some difficult books as an adult and really enjoyed them, books that I never would have read in my youth, Moby Dick, for example. You can check out my reviews of these two books here on goodreads. As for books that I hated and still hate, The DaVinci Code, The Celestine Prophecy, Love Story, and The Bridges of Madison County top the list. They are all shallow and poorly written in my opinion.


message 46: by Mark (new)

Mark McKenna (mark_mckenna) | 4 comments I agree with "Gatsby" -- the same thing happened to me. And I pretty much hated the same one's you did. I did feel the story lines were good, ie., "DaVinci," only the writing was so bad I couldn't believe it was published.


message 47: by Amanda (new)

Amanda M. Lyons (amandamlyons) George wrote: "As someone who taught English literature for 32 years, I would say that you might come back to a book that you hated in high school and try it again. I've done that myself and gained a new apprecia..."

I'm one of those unusual souls who enjoyed most of the books I read in school ;)


message 48: by George (new)

George King (kinggeorge) | 15 comments Congratulations! Maybe you had a good teacher like myself, ha!


message 49: by Amanda (new)

Amanda M. Lyons (amandamlyons) George wrote: "Congratulations! Maybe you had a good teacher like myself, ha!"

A couple, but mostly I've just always had an in born desire to read good books and so went out seeking them and enjoying them in class:)


message 50: by George (new)

George King (kinggeorge) | 15 comments I was similar to you, reading everything I could get my hands on up until high school when a preoccupation with girls and sports slowed me down. You'll be happy to know that I recovered nicely. I'm never without a book, somtimes two or three


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