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advice requests > laid or lay? I never seem to get it right.

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message 1: by John (new)

John Carroll (johncarroll) | 27 comments "Sir Danth sat on the wagon then laid down."
or
"Sir Danth sat on the wagon then lay down."

I just can't seem to get it right and neither looks correct. :( *sigh*

I really appreciate the help I get on these forums. :)


message 2: by Thea (new)

Thea Atkinson (theaatkinson) it's lay. laid is to put (mainly it is a tense of lay, but not where you use it)


message 3: by John (new)

John Carroll (johncarroll) | 27 comments Thank you very much. :)


message 4: by Shirley (new)

Shirley McLain (shirleymclain) | 8 comments OK, I need some education. If he sat on the wagon then laid down that would make both your verbs past tense. Why would you have sat and then a future tense? Thanks


message 5: by John (new)

John Carroll (johncarroll) | 27 comments Umm . . . *blank stare* . . .

*wishing I could go back to dialogue*


message 6: by Thea (new)

Thea Atkinson (theaatkinson) for clarification: maybe I was too quick

the past tense of lie is lay, so both verbs should be in past tense if you change laid to lay. laid is not a recline verb in any tense; it means to put in the past tense


message 7: by [deleted user] (new)

Excuse me throwing a spanner into the works, but why did he sit first then recline? As a reader I would want more information. Hope you don't mind my comment but I'm only trying to help. I've led quite a few writers workshops. In this instance I would advise you to be more specific, i.e. 'Tired in mind and limb, Sir Danth slumped onto the hard ground, then lay full stretch, not caring about the stones, the dust or the irritation of ants.' A little OTT perhaps, but if it helps...


message 8: by John (new)

John Carroll (johncarroll) | 27 comments spanner = wrench, yes? I'm putting in the two paragraphs where the instance occurs. I'm not wedded to him having to sit down first. Please keep in mind that this is raw, unedited work and I wrote it when I was really tired. I'm honestly not thrilled with this chapter. It's one of those that I keep writing in the hopes that a ray of brilliance will suddenly appear and make it shiny. ;)
Excerpt:

A moment later, they were standing next to a low cart with big wheels. “If you would lie down on the cart, Sir Knight, we’ll cover you up until we reach the gate. Once there, my people will try to get you through without removing the cloth,” he said, gesturing to a heavy white blanket held by one of his men who was wearing an apron. There were six people with aprons. There would have been seven if the one hadn’t run away. “If they have to uncover you, remain completely still. My people will try to talk them into letting you in. If that fails . . .” he trailed off with a shrug.

Sir Danth sat on the wagon then lay down. The man with the blanket spread it out over the knight with the help of another. Once everything was set, Elian led them to the big doors at the end of the warehouse and let them out. Liselle didn’t like wearing the apron over her clothes, but didn’t look as awkward as Tathan or Vevin, who was wearing his purple vest that he preferred when traveling and fighting.


message 9: by M.L. (new)

M.L. Bushman | 144 comments People lie or lay

Stuff is laid down.

Unless people get laid.

Sorry, couldn't resist...


message 10: by Shirley (new)

Shirley McLain (shirleymclain) | 8 comments Thank you very much, I do appreciate you giving me an answer that really makes sense to me. Now the big thing is just to remember it:)


message 11: by L.A. (new)

L.A. Hilden (lahilden) | 44 comments I have a sheet of paper where I write these little messages to myself down, it helps.


message 12: by Thom (new)

Thom Dunn | 4 comments Right now I lie on my couch. Yesterday I lay on my couch. I have lain on my couch. ....?


message 13: by Sofea (new)

Sofea (sofeaghani) | 4 comments M.L. wrote: "People lie or lay

Stuff is laid down.

Unless people get laid.

Sorry, couldn't resist..."


Haha, good one (Y)


message 14: by Thom (new)

Thom Dunn | 4 comments Sofea wrote: "M.L. wrote: "People lie or lay

Stuff is laid down.

Unless people get laid.

Sorry, couldn't resist..."

Haha, good one (Y)"


When does one use "layed" ? ....If I remember some 60-odd years ago, we never did get this whole mess straightened out in English class. Reminds me of the guy whole fell off a cruise ship. He was left to drown because he kept shouting "I WILL drown, no one SHALL save me !" instead of vice-versa.


message 15: by Jen (new)

Jen (jennaumannauthor) | 2 comments I am laughing at this post - glad I'm not the only one who struggles with it! When I get too confused I find a completely different way to say it...lol!


message 16: by Thom (new)

Thom Dunn | 4 comments Jen wrote: "I am laughing at this post - glad I'm not the only one who struggles with it! When I get too confused I find a completely different way to say it...lol!"

I was told to call that strategy "circumlocution". I proceeded to and immediately felt smarter about it all.


message 17: by Sally (last edited Mar 23, 2012 08:12AM) (new)

Sally (goodreadscomdinah) The reason we get so confused is, of course, that the format of the verbs is so weird:
lie (present), lay (past), lain (pluperfect)
lay (present), laid (past), laid (pluperfect).

I think the general rule is that lay (present) requires a direct object.
Thus:
I lie (present) on the bed (no direct object).
I lay my head (present with direct object) on the pillow when I lie down (no direct object).
I laid (past) the knife (direct object) down before I lay down (no direct object).


message 18: by Thom (new)

Thom Dunn | 4 comments Yes, and "The first time/ever I LAY with you/ I felt your heart so close to mine....."

Point being: a good example is the best teacher. ...IMAO


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