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NAPOLEONIC WARS > GLOSSARY -POST CAPTAIN

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message 1: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Nov 05, 2010 06:59PM) (new)

Bentley | 44207 comments Mod
*POTENTIAL SPOILERS*

This is the glossary for Post Captain. This is not a non spoiler thread so any urls and/or expansive discussion can take place.

Here is a url which will help with those folks trying to learn more about the ship.

http://www.thedearsurprise.com/?p=1837


message 2: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Nov 05, 2010 06:59PM) (new)

Bentley | 44207 comments Mod
This might be interesting for those folks wanting to find out more about women of this period and also the Regency Period in general.

An interesting link:

http://www.susannaives.com/nancyregen...

Source: Nancy Mayer - Regency Researcher


message 3: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44207 comments Mod
Man the Capstan:

Costume Update – The Bustle Dress

http://manthecapstan.wordpress.com/


message 4: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44207 comments Mod
Georgian London:

http://www.georgianlondon.com/


message 5: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Nov 26, 2010 02:52PM) (new)

Bentley | 44207 comments Mod
If anybody wants to post some helpful maps or links related to Post Captain, this is the thread to do it.

Post Captain (Aubrey/Maturin, #2) by Patrick O'Brian by Patrick O'Brian Patrick O'Brian


message 6: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44207 comments Mod
Peace of Amiens:

Here is a bit about the Peace of Amiens which seems to have taken place at the beginning of the book Post Captain:

http://www.nmm.ac.uk/explore/sea-and-...

Here is also a link for those folks who want to learn more about the French Revolutionary War: (our HBC thread)

http://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/2...


message 7: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44207 comments Mod
Piquet:

I actually did not know anything about this game.

This is what the introduction said about the game and its origin:

Piquet has long been regarded as one of the all-time great card games still being played. It was first mentioned on a written reference dating to 1535, in Gargantua and Pantagruel by Rabelais.

Although legend attributes the game's creation to Stephen de Vignolles, also known as La Hire, a knight in the reign of Charles VII during the Hundred Years' War, it may possibly have come into France from Spain because the words "pique" and "repique", the main features of the game, are of Spanish origin.

The game was introduced in Germany during the Thirty Years War, and texts of that period provide substantial evidence of its vogue, like the metaphorical use of the word "Repique" in the 1634-8 political poem Allamodisch Picket Spiel, which reflects the growing popularity of the game at that time.

As with other games like Bête, the substantive form of the word "Piquet" was turned into a verb and this is used substantially by Rist's 1640 Spiele: die man Picquetten[1] who gives the word his grudging assent.

Until the early 20th century, Piquet was perhaps the most popular card game in France, occupying a similar position to Cribbage in England. It first became popular in England after the marriage of Queen Mary I of England (Bloody Mary) to King Philip II of Spain in 1554. During this period the game was known as Cent, after the Spanish game Cientos, referring to the fact that one of the chief goals of Piquet is to reach 100 points.

Following the marriage of King Charles I of England to Henrietta Maria of France in 1625, the British adopted the French name for the game. It went in and out of fashion among the upper classes in Britain between the 17th and early 20th centuries. With the advent of Contract Bridge, however, Piquet has faded into general obscurity among amateur card-players.


Here is more on the game in wikipedia:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piquet


message 8: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)


message 9: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44207 comments Mod
In Chapter Four - Maturin and Aubrey arrive in Toulon.

Toulon:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toulon

Here is something about the Battle of Toulon which took place in 1793 which is before this book opened (timeframe 1802).

http://www.napoleonicsociety.com/engl...


message 10: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44207 comments Mod
Toulon - Trip Advisor Photos

http://www.tripadvisor.com/LocationPh...


message 11: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44207 comments Mod
Cholera

Cholera is an infection of the small intestine caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae. The main symptoms are profuse watery diarrhea and vomiting. Transmission is primarily through consuming contaminated drinking water or food. The severity of the diarrhea and vomiting can lead to rapid dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. Primary treatment is with oral rehydration solution and if these are not tolerated, intravenous fluids. Antibiotics are beneficial in those with severe disease. Worldwide it affects 3-5 million people and causes 100,000-130,000 deaths a year as of 2010. Cholera was one of the earliest infections to be studied by epidemiological methods.

Here is a link to find out more:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cholera

And

World Health Association Write-up:

http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsh...

This is an interesting article about the cholera outbreak in New York City in July 1832, the causes and how it was rooted out.

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/04/15/sci...


message 12: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Dec 10, 2010 12:17PM) (new)

Bentley | 44207 comments Mod
Egyptian Pox

I think they were talking about Small Pox. But why did they refer to it as the Egyptian Pox? Small Pox had actually originated in China.


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