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THE FEDERALIST PAPERS > JOHN JAY - (Spoiler Thread)

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message 1: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Mar 07, 2018 05:17AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Bentley | 44207 comments Mod
I thought it would be a good idea to have a thread dedicated to each of the authors of The Federalist Papers. This thread is dedicated to John Jay.


Jay as he appears at the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C.

John Jay (December 12, 1745 – May 17, 1829) was an American statesman, Patriot, diplomat, one of the Founding Fathers of the United States, negotiator and signatory of the Treaty of Paris of 1783, second Governor of New York, and the first Chief Justice of the United States (1789–1795). He directed U.S. foreign policy for much of the 1780s and was an important leader of the Federalist Party after the ratification of the United States Constitution in 1788.

Jay was born into a wealthy family of merchants and New York City government officials of Dutch descent. He became a lawyer and joined the New York Committee of Correspondence, organizing opposition to British polices in the time preceding the American Revolution. Jay was elected to the Second Continental Congress, and served as President of the Congress. From 1779 to 1782, Jay served as the ambassador to Spain; he persuaded Spain to provide financial aid to the fledgling United States. He also served as a negotiator of the Treaty of Paris, in which Britain recognized American independence. Following the end of the war, Jay served as Secretary of Foreign Affairs, directing United States foreign policy under the Articles of Confederation government. He also served as the first Secretary of State on an interim basis.

A proponent of strong, centralized government, Jay worked to ratify the United States Constitution in New York in 1788. He was a co-author of The Federalist Papers along with Alexander Hamilton and James Madison, and wrote five of the 85 essays. After the establishment of the new federal government, Jay was appointed by President George Washington as the first Chief Justice of the United States, serving from 1789 to 1795. The Jay Court experienced a light workload, deciding just four cases over six years. In 1794, while serving as Chief Justice, Jay negotiated the highly controversial Jay Treaty with Britain. Jay received a handful of electoral votes in three of the first four presidential elections, but never undertook a serious bid for the presidency.

Jay served as the Governor of New York from 1795 to 1801. Long an opponent of slavery, he helped enact a law that provided for the gradual emancipation of slaves, and the institution of slavery was abolished in New York in Jay's lifetime. In the waning days of President John Adams's administration, Jay was confirmed by the Senate for another term as Chief Justice, but he declined the position and retired to his farm in Westchester County, New York

Remainder of article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Jay

Source: Wikipedia


message 2: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Mar 06, 2018 05:35PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Bentley | 44207 comments Mod
Jay's Heritage Center:

Video: Examining John Jay’s Legacy at the Jay Heritage Center

http://jayheritagecenter.org/about/hi...


message 3: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new) - rated it 5 stars

Bentley | 44207 comments Mod
I do think that Jay was more instrumental than we give him credit for:



Here is an excerpt from the Columbia University papers on John Jay:

Jay wrote Thomas Jefferson with his ideas:

"Secondly, although Jay had been one of the earliest and most consistent advocates of augmenting the powers of Congress in the areas of taxation and the regulation of commerce, he was concerned that an omnipotent Congress might be established. To prevent such a possibility he advocated the separation of powers and checks and balances. "I have long sought," he wrote Jefferson in 1786, "and become daily more convinced that the construction of our Federal government is fundamentally wrong. To vest legislative, judicial, and executive powers in one and the same body of men, and that, too, in a body daily changing its members, can never be wise. In my opinion, these three great departments of sovereignty should be forever separated, and so distributed as to serve as checks on each other."[August 18, 1786, , 5860:] Again: "Let Congress legislate," he wrote Washington in 1787. "Let others execute. Let others judge." To the executive he would give a veto power over the acts passed by a dual-chambered legislature. [January 7,1787, 8424, 10393 (no images):]

JOHN JAY AND THE CONSTITUTION:

https://dlc.library.columbia.edu/jay/...

JAY AND NEW YORK

https://dlc.library.columbia.edu/jay/...

THE PAPERS OF JOHN JAY:

http://www.columbia.edu/cu/lweb/digit...

THE JAY TREATY:

https://dlc.library.columbia.edu/jay/...

JAY AND FRANCE:

https://dlc.library.columbia.edu/jay/...

JAY AND SLAVERY:

https://dlc.library.columbia.edu/jay/...

JAY PRINT PROJECT:

https://dlc.library.columbia.edu/jay/...

LEGACY PROJECT:

http://www.columbia.edu/cu/lweb/confe...

SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY:

https://dlc.library.columbia.edu/jay/...

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY BIOGRAPHY OF JOHN JAY:

https://dlc.library.columbia.edu/jay/...

Source: Columbia University


message 4: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Mar 09, 2018 11:49PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Bentley | 44207 comments Mod
John Jay: Family, Faith, & The Federalist Papers

https://youtu.be/j4S1ussrlks

Historian and author Walter Stahr discusses the life and lasting influence of John Jay, the first Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court. He discusses John Jay’s co-authorship of several of the Federalist Papers and the pivotal role he played in the founding of our nation. For more information on John Jay, check out our Part I video at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yZeR6... or browse the links below.

As always, the Federalist Society takes no position on particular legal or public policy issues; all expressions of opinion are those of the speaker.

Related Links:

John Jay: Founding Father by Walter Stahr
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B009...

Historian Walter Stahr’s website:
http://walterstahr.com/

John Jay Homestead located in Katonah, New York
http://johnjayhomestead.org/

Source: Youtube and The Federalist Society


message 5: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Mar 09, 2018 11:48PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Bentley | 44207 comments Mod
John Jay: The Reluctant Revolutionary

https://youtu.be/yZeR6aW_9dM

Historian Walter Stahr discusses the life of Founding Father John Jay and his role in forming our nation. Stahr is the author of John Jay: Founding Father.

As always, the Federalist Society takes no position on particular legal or public policy issues; all expressions of opinion are those of the speaker.

John Jay: Founding Father by Walter Stahr
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B009...

Historian Walter Stahr’s website:
http://walterstahr.com/

John Jay Homestead located in Katonah, New York
http://johnjayhomestead.org/

Source: Youtube and The Federalist Society


message 6: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new) - rated it 5 stars

Bentley | 44207 comments Mod
Another book about John Jay:

John Jay Founding Father by Walter Stahr by Walter Stahr (no photo)


message 7: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new) - rated it 5 stars

Bentley | 44207 comments Mod
055 Robb Haberman, John Jay, Forgotten Founder

Who was John Jay?


Jay played important and prominent roles during the founding of the United States and yet, his name isn’t one that many would list if asked to name founding fathers.

Today, we explore John Jay and his contributions to the founding of the United States with Robb Haberman, associate editor of The Selected Papers of John Jay documentary editing project.

https://youtu.be/TwJ2FyPGhT4

Source: Youtube


message 8: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new) - rated it 5 stars

Bentley | 44207 comments Mod
Here is another installment of the Hillsdale Federalist Papers videos:

"The Improved Science of Politics"
Overview


Publius argued that the “science of politics . . . has received great improvement” in his own day. These improvements include separation of powers, legislative checks and balances, judges who serve a life term during good behavior, and what he called “the ENLARGEMENT of the ORBIT” of government. Contrary to the practice of previous republics, Publius argued that a republic had a much greater chance of achieving success if it is spread out over a large or extended territory, rather than a small or contracted one.

Link to Video: https://online.hillsdale.edu/courses/...

And Q&A:
https://online.hillsdale.edu/courses/...


message 9: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new) - rated it 5 stars

Bentley | 44207 comments Mod
David Hume had an effect on the three Federalist Essayists.


David Hume, oil on canvas by Allan Ramsay, 1766; in the Scottish National Portrait Gallery, Edinburgh

Who was he:


David Hume, (born May 7 [April 26, Old Style], 1711, Edinburgh, Scotland—died August 25, 1776, Edinburgh), Scottish philosopher, historian, economist, and essayist known especially for his philosophical empiricism and skepticism.

Hume conceived of philosophy as the inductive, experimental science of human nature. Taking the scientific method of the English physicist Sir Isaac Newton as his model and building on the epistemology of the English philosopher John Locke, Hume tried to describe how the mind works in acquiring what is called knowledge. He concluded that no theory of reality is possible; there can be no knowledge of anything beyond experience. Despite the enduring impact of his theory of knowledge, Hume seems to have considered himself chiefly as a moralist.

Remainder of article:
https://www.britannica.com/biography/...

Source: Encyclopaedia Britannica


Title page of the first edition of the first volume of David Hume's A Treatise of Human Nature, London, England, 1739


David Hume, statue in Edinburgh.


Portrait of Scottish philosopher David Hume, by David Martin, 1770; in a private collection

A Treatise of Human Nature by David Hume by David Hume David Hume


message 10: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new) - rated it 5 stars

Bentley | 44207 comments Mod
I agree with this I really do - what do the others of you think about this? Keep the filibuster and stop the nuclear option - we need to pass bills that reflect the populace of America and not a limited view - bipartisanship is important - and of course reflection and putting the country first over a political party.

Conservatives Need to Love the Filibuster Again
It matters. It really does.

by CHARLES SYKES FEBRUARY 4, 2019 4:01 AM


Huey Long, after his record-breaking filibuster in 1935

Link: https://thebulwark.com/conservatives-...

Source: The Bulwark


message 11: by Lorna, Assisting Moderator (T) - SCOTUS - Civil Rights (new)

Lorna | 2159 comments Mod


A Brief Biography of John Jay

John Jay's long and eventful life, from 1745 to 1829, encompassed the movement for American independence and the creation of a new nation — both processes in which he played a full part. His achievements were many, varied and of key importance in the birth and early years of the fledgling nation. Although he did not initially favor separation from Britain, he was nonetheless among the American commissioners who negotiated the peace with Great Britain that secured independence for the former colonies. Serving the new republic he was Secretary for Foreign Affairs under the Articles of Confederation, a contributor to the Federalist, the first Chief Justice of the United States, negotiator of the 1794 "Jay Treaty" with Great Britain, and a two-term Governor of the State of New York. In his personal life, Jay embraced a wide range of social and cultural concerns.

His paternal grandfather, Augustus (1665-1751), established the Jay family's presence in America. Unable to remain in France when the rights of Protestants were abolished by the revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685, Augustus eventually settled in New York where, with an advantageous marriage and a thriving mercantile business, he established a strong foundation for his descendants. His son Peter, like Augustus a merchant, had ten children with his wife Mary Van Cortlandt, seven of them surviving into adulthood. John was the sixth of these seven. Shortly after John's birth, his family moved from Manhattan to Rye in order to provide a more salubrious environment for the raising of John's elder siblings, two of whom had been struck by blindness following the smallpox epidemic of 1739 and two others of whom suffered from mental handicaps.

Educated in his early years by private tutors, Jay entered the newly-founded King's College, the future Columbia University, in the late summer of 1760. There, he underwent the conventional classical education, graduating in 1764, when he became a law clerk in the office of Benjamin Kissam. On admission to the bar in 1768 Jay established a legal practice with Robert R. Livingston, Jr., scion of the "Lower Manor" branch of the Livingston family, before operating his own law office from 1771. Among other tasks during these years, Jay served as clerk of the New York-New Jersey Boundary Commission.

In the spring of 1774, Jay's life took two momentous turns. In April he married Sarah Livingston (1756-1802), the daughter of New Jersey Governor William Livingston, thus gaining important connections to a politically powerful Colonial family. In May he was swept into New York politics, largely as a result of the worsening relations with Great Britain. New York conservatives, seeking to outmaneuver more radical responses to the Intolerable Acts, nominated a "committee of 50," including Jay, to arrange the election of delegates to a Continental Congress. Throughout the revolutionary struggle, Jay followed a course of moderation, separating himself clearly from loyalists but resisting what he considered the extremism of more radical politicians. Thus, in the months before Independence he favored exploring the possibilities of rapprochement fully, helping to draft the Olive Branch Petition as a delegate to the second Continental Congress. As a delegate to the New York Convention of 1776-77, Jay had a formative influence in shaping the new state's constitution. Jay remained an important actor at the state level, becoming the Chief Justice of the state Supreme Court before moving to the national arena to assume the Presidency of Congress in late 1778.

The fall of 1779 found Jay selected for a mission to Spain, where he spent a frustrating three years seeking diplomatic recognition, financial support and a treaty of alliance and commerce. He was to spend the next four years abroad in his nation's service both as commissioner to Spain and then in Paris, where he was a member of the American delegation that negotiated the peace terms ending America's War of Independence with Britain. This process culminated with the signing of the Treaty of Paris in September 1783.

He returned to the United States in July, 1784 to discover that he had, in his absence, been elected Secretary for Foreign Affairs. In that role he was confronted by difficult issues stemming from violations of the Treaty of Paris by both countries — issues that he would later revisit in negotiations with Britain in 1794 and which would be addressed again in the resulting "Jay Treaty." Beyond his dealings with Great Britain, Jay succeeded in having the French accept a revised version of the Consular Convention that Franklin had earlier negotiated; he attempted to negotiate a treaty with Spain in which commercial benefits would have been exchanged for a renunciation of American access to the Mississippi for a number of years; and he endeavored, with limited resources, to secure the freedom of Americans captured and held for ransom in Algiers by so-called Barbary pirates. The frustrations he suffered as Secretary for Foreign Affairs, a post he held until 1789, clearly impressed upon him the need to construct a government more powerful than that under the Articles of Confederation. Though not selected to attend the Philadelphia Convention, he was a leading proponent of the principles that the new Constitution embodied and played a critical role in its ratification.

In 1787 and 1788 Jay collaborated with Alexander Hamilton and James Madison on the Federalist, authoring essays numbers two, three, four, five and, following an illness, sixty-four, thus contributing to the political arguments and intellectual discourse that led to Constitution's ratification. Jay also played a key role in shepherding the Constitution through the New York State Ratification Convention in the face of vigorous opposition. In this battle Jay relied not only on skillful political maneuvering, he also produced a pamphlet, "An Address to the People of New York," that powerfully restated the Federalist case for the new Constitution.

Read the remainder of the article: http://www.columbia.edu/cu/libraries/...

Other:
John Jay Founding Father by Walter Stahr by Walter Stahr (no photo)

Source: Columbia Education


message 12: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new) - rated it 5 stars

Bentley | 44207 comments Mod
Great add, thank you Lorna


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