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message 1: by Jo (new)

Jo Wake | 35 comments This is somewhat off most topics, but I like to keep records of my personal library and incidentally music I own. I used to make a database with Microsoft Word's programme but I found it rather cumbersome plus over the years, I lost a lot of the information. Now I am looking for an easier way of making a database of all my books and authors. Can anyone recommend anything? I can't be the only one who does this!!!


message 2: by Felina (new)

Felina I have lists of all the books I own, have read and book’s I have traded on PBS so you are not alone with the lists. In fact, I hear list making is usually a habit of avid readers. I would suggest Access by Microsoft. It’s a great program but can be tricky to learn to use if you are not familiar. Get a how to book if you go that way. For Mac's there is Bento which does mostly everything Access does except...well...it tends to be easier. Much more intuitive. I had a list on Access then when I got my new Mac I moved it over to Bento and its worked great. There is always Excel if your list isn't very long although the searching options in Excel are cumbersome and not dependable.


message 3: by Richard (last edited Sep 28, 2010 12:15PM) (new)

Richard (thinkingbluecountingtwo) | 138 comments I use Librarian Pro from Koingo Software on my Mac (also available for Windows). It's not free but it does so much more than I need, suitable for book sellers, libraries and collectors alike. It lets you catalogue books, music, movies, games etc. etc. to your hearts content and links seamlessly with Amazon to download cover art, reviews etc. The above links should take you to the relevant web pages if you're interested.

Cheers,

Richard.


message 4: by Chris (new)

Chris  (haughtc) Wow. I thought I was a nerd for the excel files I keep my book records on. Not only am I not alone in this process, but Felina is hardcore. She uses Access! I'm in awe.


message 5: by Felina (last edited Sep 28, 2010 12:22PM) (new)

Felina Umm Chris you should know that I take by databasing seriously! But that Librarian Pro has me drooling.

Oh and if you have an iPhone there is a very cool app called iBookshelf that scans books and places them in your library as owned, borrowed or want and also keeps track of a lot of really cool information including the net value of your library. I was shocked when I saw mine. It also keeps a wishlist so when I go to the bookstore I can see what books I want to buy. Not sure if its available for other smart phones. Only cost $1.99 I think. Oh and its connected to GR so you can see the GR description and average rating when you load a book.


message 6: by [ A ] (new)

[ A ] | 2 comments Bookpedia has been a program I am interested in purchasing. My database is currently in AppleWorks' Database (yes, very, very old but luckily can easily be exported to CSV). I believe Bookpedia is only for Mac OS at the moment, but from my demoing it looks like a great solution.

http://www.bruji.com/bookpedia/


message 7: by Chris (new)

Chris  (haughtc) I don't have a smartphone. I'm not qualified to use it.


message 8: by Felina (new)

Felina Whatever, the iPhone is by far the easiest phone I've ever had. Push the app you want to use and its running. Want to get out of that app? Just push the only button on the phone. Easy peasy. If AT&T didn't suck so bad I would recommend it to all device illiterate people. I got my mom one and she loves it...this is a woman who needs me to start up the internet for her. If she can do it, anybody can.


message 9: by Ken (new)

Ken (ogi8745) | 1357 comments I have all my books and movies kept on a simple txt document. My reasoning is that I can open it with any sort of Word type program so if technology evolves I can ALWAYS open a TXT document


message 10: by Jo (new)

Jo Wake | 35 comments Access is the programme on which I created my original lists, but over the years, I lost my database. However, I agree, it can be a bit awkward to learn, as I said, I find it somewhat cumbersome. I will certainly have a look at Librarian Pro, but may not be able to afford it in which case I will be forced back to Access. I have to re-enter the whole thing which will take me a while. This goes back to earlier days when backups were not as good as they are to day.


message 11: by Kathi, Moderator & Book Lover (new)

Kathi | 3327 comments Mod
Amanda (JT) wrote: "My database is currently in AppleWorks' Database (yes, very, very old but luckily can easily be exported to CSV)."

I, too, have my books in an AppleWorks Database and someone recommended Bookpedia to me. Unfortunately, I need something that can go on both a Mac and a PC. If you export the database to CSV, then what can you do with it?


message 12: by Jo (new)

Jo Wake | 35 comments Having decided that the various programmes were too expensive, I started re-entering my info on Access. However, I then thought I would scan my original lists which I did and now I have them all on Word. Worked fine. I have now to do the same with my Recordings. Thanks for all the input


message 13: by [ A ] (new)

[ A ] | 2 comments Kathi wrote: "If you export the database to CSV, then what can you do with it? "


Hi Kathi, sorry for this late reply!

CSV is a format that can be read by pretty much every single database and/or word processing program. :) It means "Comma-Separated Values". So basically, when you export your book database, you will get a big text file that has each row in your database separated by commas.

Excel in particular is excellent about importing these files.

I don't think Bookpedia works on PC, and I'm not sure if they have plans to make a port of it. So perhaps would not be a good choice for you unfortunately. :(


message 14: by Kathi, Moderator & Book Lover (new)

Kathi | 3327 comments Mod
Amanda (JT) wrote: "Hi Kathi, sorry for this late reply!"

Amanda, no worries, I read this group discussion most every day and haven't done anything yet with my Appleworks Database files, so I think I may try this. Excel would be great because I can have the files on Mac, PC, Palm, and iPod touch. I just didn't want to enter everything by hand.
Thanks!


message 15: by [deleted user] (new)

Question for those with Kindle--I've never had one, always done paper and ink books. Now I'm thinking seriously about getting a Kindle. If you have one, do you like it more than a paper book? Is it easy to find the books you want to read? Did you get the cover?


message 16: by Marty (new)

Marty (martyjm) | 310 comments Laura, I love mine. not exactly the same experience. the flipping back and forth to see something that happened earlier I can't do with the kindle. I did get a cover which I like. I also like being able to carry all those books in that little package. Also really like the dictionary access (move the cursor by the word and ta da! it will be defined at the bottom of the page. It is also really nice on footnotes. I like to read them and find the two bookmark back and forth a pain with a paper book. on kindle it's a click to go to it and another button to go back. Now I want a nook because I like to spread my business around and want to see how that reader is comparitively. It is not the same and some people don't seem to be able to get past that. for me it is great. whatever you decide, Happy Reading!


message 17: by Marty (new)

Marty (martyjm) | 310 comments tried to edit that to be more coherent and somehow it did not work. oh well. let me know if i was confusing....


message 18: by Jo (new)

Jo Wake | 35 comments I have been reading ebooks on my Palm Zire for years. Long before Kindle came out. I like the convenience and the ability to carry several books around with me, but I prefer to read a paper and ink book any time. I own some 300 ebooks, so I am not inexperienced in reading electronically.


message 19: by Sally (new)

Sally (mxsallybend) | 7 comments I went with the Sony Reader Pocket Edition and I love it. Yes, it lacks the wireless features of the Kindle, but it's compact, quick, and holds a ton of books. I find the display very natural and easy to read, with no eyestrain even after hours of reading.

I still love the feel of a real book, but it's great to have a library in my pocket.


message 20: by Felina (new)

Felina I have a Kindle and I do like its design but I'm finding that more and more eBooks are just as/if not more expensive than a new paperback book. I've found unless you travel a lot (which I was when I bought my Kindle but have since stopped) its really not worth it to me. If you don't search out used books and usually buy your books new then its a great tool to have. I hate hard bound books so if something is coming out that I can't wait for in paperback (Under the Dome) then I will get it on my Kindle. And most classics are free for Kindle (is this true for the Nook?). If I had to make the choice again I wouldn't have bought an eReader in general.


message 21: by Stefan, Group Founder + Moderator (Retired) (new)

Stefan (sraets) | 1667 comments Mod
My take: the entire ebook reader thing leaves me cold. I like paper books. I don't feel the need to carry a library around with me because I never find myself thinking "gee, I wish I could read some right now". I just don't have the slightest inclination to bring electronics into my reading experience right now - and that's speaking as someone who is usually very much into gadgets.

On the other hand, I find it neat that you can read magazines and newspapers on e-readers and get them delivered electronically. It sounds convenient and saves some trees. However, I would need a color screen to really enjoy this, so the Kindle is pretty much out of the question. I'd probably go for an iPad, but right now you can get a nice basic laptop for the cost of an iPad, so I have no inclination to invest in this until the price comes down a bit.


message 22: by [deleted user] (new)

Dear all,

Thanks for your thoughts and experiences on the subject. I think I will put it on my wishlist low priority for Xmas and if it turns up under the tree, great, If not, still okay. I only buy a new book once in a while, generally it's used. I am a big fan of re-use, especially of books. I love PBS.


message 23: by Felina (new)

Felina I'd probably go for an iPad, but right now you can get a nice basic laptop for the cost of an iPad, so I have no inclination to invest in this until the price comes down a bit.

Soooo true. Way to expensive.

I bought the first edition Kindle and was in love with it for about 6 months and now I never touch it. I like the idea for iPad more because it does more than just be an ereader. And, Laura, I bought my Kindle before I really understood all the outlets for getting second hand books. Its so easy and so inexpensive.


message 24: by Christine (new)

Christine | 620 comments As someone who almost never buys books (but since I've joined this group, I have bought some books...) but rather uses my public library, I love my Sony eReader. I can access books 24/7 so when i travel, I don't have to lug around several pounds of books (many of which I will never read) out of fear of running out of books on vacations. I have been vilified by my neighbors for not supporting my local bookstore (and others here may also choose to vilify me), but this is my habit. I didn't want to have to buy books which is why the Sony


message 25: by Peterb (last edited Oct 29, 2010 05:04AM) (new)

Peterb If your neighbors are really vilifying you for "not supporting your local bookstore", then you need new neighbors, because your existing ones are cretinous jerks.

I use my iPad, both the iBooks app and the Kindle app. The only way you'll get it away from me is by prying it out of my cold, dead, hands. I don't care if I never touch a paper book again for as long as I live. Everywhere I go I am carrying an entire portable library to which I can add books at will without increasing weight or bulk. I can adjust the font sizes to suit my taste (and my poor eyesight).

Basically, e-readers have re-energized my reading life, allowing me to read as much as I want, whenever I want, and wherever I want, without drowning me in clutter. Paper books can bite me.


message 26: by Christine (new)

Christine | 620 comments Peterb wrote: "If your neighbors are really vilifying you for "not supporting your local bookstore", then you need new neighbors, because your existing ones are cretinous jerks.

I use my iPad, both the iBooks ap..."


Thank you Peter for understanding the allure of an eReader; I love to read and love the idea of having so many books so easily available


message 27: by Random (new)

Random (rand0m1s) | 877 comments Peterb wrote: "Paper books can bite me."

That added a good laugh to my morning. :)

I can completely agree. Anymore I'm almost strictly digital in one form or another, only going to paper when I've no other option. Even then, I tend to drag my feet on those in the hopes that if I wait a digital edition will show up.


message 28: by Stefan, Group Founder + Moderator (Retired) (new)

Stefan (sraets) | 1667 comments Mod
Christine wrote: "Thank you Peter for understanding the allure of an eReader; I love to read and love the idea of having so many books so easily available "

See, for me this doesn't matter. I only read one book at a time, very occasionally two, so I don't need to have more than one book available at a time. When I'm done with one, I pick up the next one. If I used an e-reader, it'd be exactly the same.

However, I used to travel for business very frequently, and I could see it being useful in that situation. Even then, I'd probably just have a couple of paperbacks in my luggage.

The magazine/newspaper thing is still the only aspect that's remotely interesting for me.


message 29: by Felina (new)

Felina Peterb wrote: "If your neighbors are really vilifying you for "not supporting your local bookstore", then you need new neighbors, because your existing ones are cretinous jerks.

I use my iPad, both the iBooks ap..."


I like my Kindle app on my phone a lot. I don't like to carry a purse (just my phone and very small wallet that fits nicely into a pocket) so with my phone I don't have to worry about being stuck at the DMV for an hour and having to waste reading time. But I just can't justify spending $8.00 for a book I could get second hand for $.50.


message 30: by Michelle (new)

 Michelle (varmint3) | 34 comments Laura wrote: "Question for those with Kindle--I've never had one, always done paper and ink books. Now I'm thinking seriously about getting a Kindle. If you have one, do you like it more than a paper book? Is..."

Laura,

I have had my Kindle for almost 2 years now and vacations will never be the same - they're much "lighter" now =).

It's not a matter of liking it more or less than paper - they're just different. I still buy paper books if the Kindle version is not available when I want/need to read something, but tend to get the Kindle version if it's available. One big thing to consider - if you read a lot of books with pictures, footnotes, maps or other reference material, the Kindle WILL be a different experience and possibly have quite a learning curve as you get used to accessing these materials on the device. Books without this type of stuff read very much like a paper book. I don't buy anything for Kindle where having color or super-clear photos/illustrations will make a difference to comprehensibility. Regular novels & story collections without illustrations though, are prefect for the Kindle. So the type of reading you do can affect your Kindle experience & have a big impact on whether you like it or not...


message 31: by Ken (new)

Ken (ogi8745) | 1357 comments Stefan and I are on the same page. I read one book at a time, no need for a e-reader with 12 gigs of books. I do have a couple of short stories on my phone for emergencies.
One final big thing for me. If I leave the kindle, Nook or whatever somewhere I am out some big bucks.


message 32: by Jeff (new)

Jeff Watson | 55 comments I downloaded the Windows trial of Librarian Pro and after a few minutes there are a few of things about it I'm not impressed with. It doesn't seem to remember Series that I enter in the editable Series drop down. Not much use to have a drop down if you can't populated it. It also keeps telling me the database has been modified since it was open (this is a multi-user feature I believe). Since I'm the one who changed the DB it would be nice if it didn't bug me. I can't find a way to turn it off. It's rather twitchy when it comes to setting My Rating. Click on the star and it half selects it. I found I have to click to upper right of the star to get a full star selected. Is the Mac version this twitchy?


message 33: by Sandra (last edited Oct 30, 2010 02:44PM) (new)

Sandra  (sleo) | 1141 comments Stefan wrote: "My take: the entire ebook reader thing leaves me cold. I like paper books. I don't feel the need to carry a library around with me because I never find myself thinking "gee, I wish I could read s..."

Nook is ccming out with a new color reader in a bit - much cheaper than an iPad, for reading magazines and such, Stefan. I admit being a bit of a tech gadget geek, but the main reason I bought my Nook is because I have a hard time with small print and it lets me read in any size print that's comfortable. The other thing I love about it is the ease of searching for words, names, etc. in books - either to remind myself who a character is or what is being talked about or to look up things for book discussions and quotes.

I have plenty of both paper books and ebooks and do like the feel, smell, etc. of paper books, but sure do love the portability and convenience of my Nook. Find something I want? Fire up my Nook, look it up and buy it right now. No need for trips to the bookstore or online ordering and then waiting and waiting for it to come. Bad for impulse buying, though. But if I go to a bookstore, the impulse buying is even worse. Instead of one book, I buy five and some bookmarks, cards, book lights, fancy memo pads and pens and you name it while I'm at it.

I went to the bookstore to buy my granddaughter a present for her 10th birthday. She wanted the 7th Harry Potter book (I turned her onto them last year and she and my daughter read them aloud together), so I got that, then saw a set of the A Wrinkle in Time series, so got that, some little fancy clips for page edges to mark your place, and a new book light. I gave the receipt to my daughter in case she wanted to exchange anything and she told me I shouldn't have spent that much on Hannah's birthday present. LOL I had to tell her that some of it was for me. :D


message 34: by Kathi, Moderator & Book Lover (new)

Kathi | 3327 comments Mod
Travel is the reason I probably would get an e-reader of some kind.

For those of you who read on your phone or device the size of an iPhone or iPod Touch--isn't the screen kind of small? I use my husband's Touch when we travel to access email and it makes me crazy. To fit a decent about of text on the page, the font is too small to read. To have the font a comfortable size to read, I can only see a little text at a time.


message 35: by Random (new)

Random (rand0m1s) | 877 comments I currently use the HTC HD2, which is a little larger display size from my coworker's iphone. I find the size is perfect, any larger and it would be too big.

When I first started using ereaders (over 10 years ago now) my first objection was display size, but after a small amount of time (within the first book) I found that it didn't bother me at all. While you tend to turn pages more often, I find myself doing so while barely noticing what I'm doing.

While I have nothing against dedicated readers, I personally won't buy one. I have a thing about devices I own needing to be multipurpose. I don't like to carry much stuff with me.


message 36: by Kerry (new)

Kerry (rocalisa) | 487 comments I'm like Random and I want a multi-purpose device. I also prefer something that fits in my pocket as there are times I don't want to have to carry a whole handbag around. I also tend to use a walking stick when I'm out of the house and it adds to the complication of carrying things.

I currently use my iPhone for everything and I love that I can get away with just carrying that and my car keys and have pretty much everything I need with me.

I don't personally find the screen size a problem, at least not at this point in my life. I actually see much better up close and with my glasses off for reading, so size isn't an issue. I think the thing that would most likely get me to spring for a dedicated ereader in the future would if my eyesight became an issue. Right now it's not and as I said, I love having everything in one place.


message 37: by Jeff (new)

Jeff Watson | 55 comments I've purchased Windows software to catalog my books. The software is ReaderWare and comes in three flavors books, videos, and music. It addressed all the issues I had with other software. It has some very powerful features as well. It has the ability to drag a link from a web source (amazon for instance) and drop it on a hotspot in the UI and it will import the information from the source webpage. You can enter UPC symbol numbers and the system will go to any selection of a number of sources such as Barnes and Noble, Amazon, etc to download the info. Additionally, it supports barcode scanners so that the UPC symbols can be scanned into the software. If you buy all three flavors of the software and order the CD you get a free wand barcode reader.


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