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message 1: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Jan 25, 2019 04:48PM) (new)

Bentley | 40070 comments Mod
This will be the thread dedicated to Jazz.



Jazz is a music genre that originated at the beginning of the 20th century in African American communities in the Southern United States from a confluence of African and European music traditions. From its early development until the present, jazz has incorporated music from 19th and 20th century American popular music.

Its West African pedigree is evident in its use of blue notes, improvisation, polyrhythms, syncopation, and the swung note.

The word "jazz" (in early years also spelled "jass") began as a West Coast slang term and was first used to refer to music in Chicago in about 1915.

From its beginnings in the early 20th century jazz has spawned a variety of subgenres: New Orleans Dixieland dating from the early 1910s, big band-style swing from the 1930s and 1940s, bebop from the mid-1940s, a variety of Latin jazz fusions such as Afro-Cuban and Brazilian jazz, free jazz from the 1950s and 1960s, jazz fusion from the 1970s, acid jazz from the 1980s (which added funk and hip-hop influences), and Nujazz in the 1990s. As the music has spread around the world it has drawn on local national and regional musical cultures, its aesthetics being adapted to its varied environments and giving rise to many distinctive styles.


Source: Wikipedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jazz


message 2: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig This is a very good book. Chicago was a center for jazz before New York City.

Chicago Jazz A Cultural History, 1904-1930 by William Howland Kenney by William Howland Kenney


message 3: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig The music historian,Gunther Schuller, has written a two-volume history of jazz:

Early Jazz Its Roots and Musical Development (History of Jazz) by Gunther Schuller by Gunther Schuller The Swing Era The Development of Jazz, 1930-1945 (The History of Jazz, Vol. 2) by Gunther Schuller by Gunther Schuller

The thing about these books is that you have to know a little bit of music to appreciate them. However, I liked them.


message 4: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig A couple of great resources:

The Biographical Encyclopedia of Jazz by Ira Gitler by Leonard G. Feather

The Penguin Guide to Jazz on CD Seventh Edition (Penguin Guide to Jazz Recordings) by Richard Cook by Richard Cook


message 5: by Alisa (new)

Alisa (mstaz) This just popped into my radar today and judging by the goodreads users ratings and reviews it looks quite interesting. An icon of jazz, hard to imagine this musical genre without his contribution.
Pops A Life of Louis Armstrong by Terry Teachout byTerry Teachout


message 6: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 40070 comments Mod
Yes perfect Alisa.


message 7: by Alisa (new)

Alisa (mstaz) but when are we going to find the time to read them all? at this rate i need to live to 100.

this one looks really good though, glad you like the add.


message 8: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 40070 comments Mod
Yes, that is the problem..we cannot read them all...though we might want to.

But I love the threads and the idea of interest areas because folks can sample from all of these and get a taste of the different topics and events and in this case musical giants.


message 9: by Garret (last edited Oct 06, 2010 12:18PM) (new)

Garret (ggannuch) Alisa wrote: "This just popped into my radar today and judging by the goodreads users ratings and reviews it looks quite interesting. An icon of jazz, hard to imagine this musical genre without his contribution..."

I am about 1/2 way through this and am enjoying it very much. I am taking it slow as I am trying to listen to all of the music mentioned in the book. Terry Teachout is a wonderful writer. Check out his blog About Last Night. If you search his site for the book Pops or google Pops and teachout you can find many online interviews he has done about the book, audio and video podcasts, some with great stories. The intro to this book alone is just about worth the price of admission.

About Last Night


message 10: by Garret (new)

Garret (ggannuch) Bentley wrote: "This will be the thread dedicated to Jazz."

Really glad to see this topic!

Thanks Bently


message 11: by Garret (new)

Garret (ggannuch) I just watched a fascinating documentary on singer Jackie Paris, 'Tis Autumn the search for Jackie Paris. This is an interesting sideline in the history of Jazz. A now little known but highly respected singer from the bebop era who performed with Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, who got accolades from Peggy Lee, Ella Fitzgerald, and many jazz musicians. He was the first vocalist to record Monk's 'Round Midnight and his recording of Skylark is considered by many to be the definitive version.

http://www.hangoverlounge.com/index.html

I am not aware of any biography.


message 12: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 40070 comments Mod
Garret wrote: "Alisa wrote: "This just popped into my radar today and judging by the goodreads users ratings and reviews it looks quite interesting. An icon of jazz, hard to imagine this musical genre without hi..."

Thank you so much Garret and glad you like these topics. Thank you for the add.


message 13: by Garret (new)

Garret (ggannuch) Be sure to check out
West Coast Jazz Modern Jazz in California, 1945-1960 by Ted Gioia The History of Jazz by Ted Gioia both byTed Gioia

The Oxford Companion to Jazz by Bill Kirchner Bill Kirchner
Kirchner, a jazz musician, radio host and scholar, is the editor to this multi-author work which includes many topics breezed over or ignored by most jazz histories. The contributors range from musicians to journalists to lyricists to historians to many well recognized jazz writers.


message 14: by Garret (new)

Garret (ggannuch) Bryan wrote: "The music historian,Gunther Schuller, has written a two-volume history of jazz:

Early Jazz Its Roots and Musical Development (History of Jazz) by Gunther Schuller by Gunther Schuller..."


"Early Jazz" Early Jazz Its Roots and Musical Development (History of Jazz) by Gunther Schuller by Gunther Schulleris considered a classic on this era. I read it many years ago and learned a lot. I also have The Swing Era The Development of Jazz, 1930-1945 (The History of Jazz, Vol. 2) by Gunther Schuller in my collection but never got around to it. It has been criticized for inaccuracies in some other books I've read. I see you liked this Bently so I should put it in my to read list. I have found that many inaccuracies in jazz history are perpetuated from book to book and once out there it seems hard to purge them from the histories despite good scholarship pointing out the errors.


message 15: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Sep 28, 2010 09:11AM) (new)

Bentley | 40070 comments Mod
Yes, Bryan also liked them. You are so right Garret; some stories and inaccuracies just seem to go from book to book like folklore.

Thank you for your adds. They do look interesting.


message 16: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig Garret: I heard the same thing about the second book, too.

I have not read Ward's companion book to Ken Burns' Jazz:

Jazz A History of America's Music by Geoffrey C. Ward Geoffrey C. Ward Geoffrey C. Ward


message 17: by Garret (new)

Garret (ggannuch) I read this when it came out. It is lavishly illustrated. It was blasted by some writers at the time in the jazz community for being too selective, misleading and containing errors and gross omissions. However, there is a lot to commend it and as long as it is not the only work on jazz one reads it probably is worth it alone for all the great photos and reproductions which give a flavor of the eras. I hated the boring PBS series that it accompanies so this is not a reference I turn to. But I think a lot of people enjoyed both the book and the documentary.


message 18: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 40070 comments Mod
Good post Garret and very informative.


message 19: by [deleted user] (new)

Any Anita O'Day fans out there? Here's a link to a fun live 1963 performance of Tea for Two:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hXKvaD...

And another link to an excerpt from a good documentary on her life and career:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QfcH8f...


message 20: by Garret (new)

Garret (ggannuch) Anita was still at the top of her form in the early 60's. Thanks for the link.


message 21: by Alisa (new)

Alisa (mstaz) A favorite stop of mine when I am in The Crescent City and am sure many others have wandered by or heard music when passing by on the street. I really don't care that it is the size of a postage stamp and easy for tourists to find, it's still a cool place and one with a distinct historic feel even when the music is not playing. And here is a book about it, might be worth a quick read.
Preservation Hall (Bayou) by William Carter byWilliam Carter
and what's not to love about these old guys who still tear it up whenever they get the chance?

Preservation Hall Jazz Band


message 22: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig Alisa wrote: "A favorite stop of mine when I am in The Crescent City and am sure many others have wandered by or heard music when passing by on the street. I really don't care that it is the size of a postage s..."

Great band, and we when we went on a pilgrimage to New Orleans, were the only folks that stayed for two sets!


message 23: by Alisa (new)

Alisa (mstaz) Bryan, I could stand in that cramped little space for hours! Everywhere in that city is great for music but Preservation Hall is a classic.


message 24: by Garret (new)

Garret (ggannuch) It definitely is fun!


message 25: by Garret (last edited Sep 29, 2010 06:47AM) (new)

Garret (ggannuch) Where the Dark and the Light Folks Meet by Randall Sandke Randy Sandke by Randall Sandke is a well researched look at racism and inequality in the jazz world and ways this has changed over more than a century. His research seems to set a lot of misconceptions straight. I read this one earlier this year. Sandke is a brilliant jazz trumpeter.


message 26: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 40070 comments Mod
That looks like another great book Garret.


message 27: by Alisa (new)

Alisa (mstaz) Garret, great recommendation. Looks like my to-read shelf is going to grow quickly here. Thanks.


message 28: by Garret (last edited Oct 06, 2010 12:17PM) (new)

Garret (ggannuch) Jazz Matters Reflections on the Music & Some of Its Makers by Doug Ramsey Take Five The Public and Private Lives of Paul Desmond by Doug Ramsey by Doug Ramsey These are 2 great books on jazz artists by the man who writes best jazz blog around, Rifftides.

Rifftides


Jazz matters is a collection of his writings covering numerous artists. The Paul Desmond biography is one of the most beautiful biographies you will run across. Stunning photos. What coffee table books aspire to. Desmond was quite an interesting man. He had a quick mind, musically and verbally. He had aspirations to be a writer. Along with the instantly recognizable style and sound, the wit comes through in his playing, When soloing, many jazz artists will quote other songs, classical music or other artist's solos. Ramsey explains how he often weaved quotes together to tell witty stories.

Anyone have a favorite biography on a jazz artist?


message 29: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 40070 comments Mod
Bird Lives! The High Life and Hard Times of Charlie (Yardbird) Parker by Ross Russell by Ross Russell

Synopsis:

Charlie Parker is considered one of the most influential jazz musicians in the history of the music. This biography is a vivid account of the innovative saxophonist's immense talents and tragic flaws. From the perspective of Ross Russell, who worked closely with Parker as a record producer, the book tells of Bird's rapid ascent to legendary status, and his spiraling downfall and early death.


message 30: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Sep 28, 2010 09:46PM) (new)

Bentley | 40070 comments Mod
DUKE ELLINGTON AND HIS ORCHESTRA:

This is old footage; fairly high quality except for some flutters at the beginning.

Enjoyable concert by Duke and the band.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SSxTHS...


message 31: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig In response to Garret's question:

Art Tatum is one of my all time favorites jazz artists. Considered one of the greatest pianists, he hailed from Toledo where my grandma lived.

Too Marvelous for Words The Life and Genius of Art Tatum by James T. Lester by James T. Lester


message 32: by André, Honorary Contributor - EMERITUS - Music (last edited Sep 29, 2010 06:46AM) (new)

André (andrh) | 2798 comments Mod
Kind of Blue The Making of the Miles Davis Masterpiece by Ashley Kahn by Ashley Kahn
A Love Supreme The Story of John Coltrane's Signature Album by Ashley Kahn by Ashley Kahn

I thought since this is as much about books as about the music I put in these two.

My favorite "period" is Bop with Cannonball Adderley, Hank Mobley, Thelonious Monk, John Coltrane, McCoy Tyner, Bill Evans, Modern Jazz Quartet, Shirley Horn, Miles Davis, Billie Holiday, and some Stan Getz, Art Pepper, CHet Baker among my favorites (I know they're not all pure Bop - I just named them as they came up.)


message 33: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig Andre:

I heard about this book and I'm glad you recommend it.

Don't forget to add the cover and author:

Kind of Blue The Making of the Miles Davis Masterpiece by Ashley Kahn by Ashley Kahn


message 34: by Garret (new)

Garret (ggannuch) Bryan wrote: "In response to Garret's question:

Art Tatum is one of my all time favorites jazz artists. Considered one of the greatest pianists, he hailed from Toledo where my grandma lived.

[bookcover:Too..."

Thanks. I see that there is a Kindle edition available. Can't wait to read this one. He is one of my favorites as well. I remember listening to Oscar Peterson describe his first experience listening to Art Tatum to Andre Previn on a show Previn did in the 70s. Peterson's dad played something recorded by Tatum for Oscar to hear. After Oscar learned it was only one, not 2, pianists playing, he was depressed for weeks. Didn't touch the piano.


message 35: by André, Honorary Contributor - EMERITUS - Music (new)

André (andrh) | 2798 comments Mod
Bryan wrote: "Andre:

Don't forget to add the cover and author:


Don't worry Bryan. I had pushed the wrong button before I knew it. It's all there as you can see.
Best



message 36: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig Garret wrote: "Bryan wrote: "In response to Garret's question:

Art Tatum is one of my all time favorites jazz artists. Considered one of the greatest pianists, he hailed from Toledo where my grandma lived.

..."


LOL, Tatum had that affect on people. They were totally blown away.


message 37: by Garret (last edited Oct 06, 2010 12:16PM) (new)

Garret (ggannuch) Here's a jazz web site with good historical and biographical information.

Jazz.com


message 38: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Sep 30, 2010 04:35PM) (new)

Bentley | 40070 comments Mod
I thought that some of you might enjoy this video:

Black and Tan fantasy; Creole Love call

http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x156...

Black and Tan Fantasy Ellington Duke 1958

Duke Ellington on tour. From a 1958 concert in Amsterdam (I think it was the Concertgebouw) we see a performance of a famous medley of tunes from the Duke's early repertoire.
Black and Tan Fantasy, Creole Love Call and the Mooche.

Through the years Duke would frequently change the featured solo players, the arrangements and the assortment of instrumentation, all to keep it interesting for himself, challinging for the musicians and surprising for his audiences.

Duke Ellington - Black And Tan Fantasy 1929 Arthur Whetsol plays the jungle style trumpet solos!

This write-up was from youtube:

Duke Ellington and his Orchestra 1929.
Black And Tan Fantasy.
Black Beauty
Cotton Club Stomp

These are excerpts of the early jazz art movie : Black And Tan Fantasy
It shows the band in a setting very close to what the band did in the famous cotton club, backing dancers, singers and other acts.

Black and Tan Fantasy is one of the first pieces Ellington recorded in what is now called jungle style.
Originally in 1927 it was a kind of solo piece for trumpetter Bubber Miley. There also exist a lovely version (Even 2 takes) where Jabbo Smith substitutes for Miley, also 1927.
When the time was ready in 1929 to make a movie recording, Miley had allready left the Ellington band.
What makes this movie very interesting is that not Miley's follow up, Cootie Williams plays the solos, but instead it is Arthur Whetsol. Cootie was allready in the band, but self declared in an interview that at first he did laugh about the growl/plunger solos and only after a while started studying it seriously.

Arthur Whetsol was more known for his lyrical solo work, a famous example is the haunting beautyfull tone on Creole Rhapsody. Another striking lyrical solo by Whetsol can be heard on Black Beauty, also in this movie. Also note that Whetsol plays the muted solo on Black and Tan with a harmon mute, usually it is done with a plunger by others.

Also an interesting note is that the alto saxophone solo, that used to be played by Otto Hardwicke, is not played by his follow up Johnny Hodges, but instead by Harry Carney, more famous for his baritone sax contributions.

Tricky Sam Nanton plays his usual plunger solo, which is pure magic!

Duke Ellington - piano, composer
Fred Guy - banjo
Wellman Braud - double bass
Sonny Greer - drums
Arthur Whetsol, Cootie Williams, Freddy Jenkins - trumpets
Joe "Tricky Sam" Nanton - trombone, Juan Tizol - valve trombone
Johnny Hodges, Harry Carney, Barney Bigard - reeds

Freddie Washington - dancer

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oy4CL2...


message 39: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 40070 comments Mod
"It Don't Mean a Thing (If It Ain't Got That Swing)"

Duke Ellington - It don't mean a thing (1943)

This one has Bubber Miley playing.

Here is the youtube write-up:

Duke Ellington and his orchestra playing this awesome tune in 1943.

"It Don't Mean a Thing (If It Ain't Got That Swing)" is a 1931 composition by Duke Ellington with lyrics by Irving Mills, now accepted as a jazz standard. The music was written and arranged by Ellington in August 1931 during intermissions at Chicago's Lincoln Tavern and was first recorded by Ellington and his orchestra for Brunswick Records (Br 6265) on February 2, 1932. Ivie Anderson sang the vocal and trombonist Joe Nanton and alto saxophonist Johnny Hodges played the instrumental solos. The title was based on the oft stated credo of Ellington's former trumpeter Bubber Miley, who was dying of tuberculosis. The song became famous, Ellington wrote, "as the expression of a sentiment which prevailed among jazz musicians at the time." Probably the first song to use the phrase "swing" in the title, it introduced the term into everyday language and presaged the Swing Era by three years. The Ellington band played the song continuously over the years and recorded it numerous times, most often with trumpeter Ray Nance as vocalist.

Possibly I should set up a thread for SWING

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qDQpZT...


message 40: by [deleted user] (new)

Bentley -- RE: your Ellington posts -- Bravo!


message 41: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 40070 comments Mod
I am glad that you liked them.


message 42: by André, Honorary Contributor - EMERITUS - Music (new)

André (andrh) | 2798 comments Mod
Terrific find Bentley! Amazing what's all on Youtube! Also your additional info: thanks!


message 43: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 40070 comments Mod
I guess you just have to look for it. Google has done a good job too.


message 44: by André, Honorary Contributor - EMERITUS - Music (new)

André (andrh) | 2798 comments Mod
Sure. The good thing with this older stuff - or should I say diamonds?! - they won't block it.
I don't know if you heard but here in Europe, especially Germany the local record companies/GEMA etc. block certain videos because they fear they're losing money...


message 45: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 40070 comments Mod
Hmmm - you know there is a lot that I cannot play from Europe - now that you mention it. I wonder though, I think most folks who really like the music want to buy the real thing for sound quality and the rest of the reasons.


message 46: by André, Honorary Contributor - EMERITUS - Music (new)

André (andrh) | 2798 comments Mod
Sure. But with the "younger generation" just knowing the sound quality they get through downloads (and some companies even reducing the quality of their cd's (a nice example, the latest "remaster" of Exile on Main Street or Oasis' latest) we can only hope for the best.
Since the Japanese were always keen on preserving sound quality maybe they will one day be the ones "saving" the recordings...?!?


message 47: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 40070 comments Mod
You know Andre - it seems we have more stuff of inferior quality every day.


message 48: by André, Honorary Contributor - EMERITUS - Music (new)

André (andrh) | 2798 comments Mod
What do they say? Amen to that!


message 49: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig It makes me glad I still have a sizable jazz CD library. Not as convenient to move around, but good sound.


message 50: by André, Honorary Contributor - EMERITUS - Music (new)

André (andrh) | 2798 comments Mod
Bryan, you're so right. Just imagine listening to a compressed Kind of Blue....


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