Classic Horror Lovers discussion

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Themes > What do you think of modern stories that use famous characters from classic horror?

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message 1: by Danielle The Book Huntress , Jamesian Enthusiast (last edited Sep 19, 2010 12:18PM) (new)

 Danielle The Book Huntress  (gatadelafuente) | 1347 comments Mod
I profess I rather like seeing Dracula and the like show up in modern stories (when it's well done and with respect). I think it encourages readers to seek out the original sources, and keeps these characters alive in popular culture.

I admit, in one of the stories I wrote, my heroine was corresponding with Dr. Van Helsing and Dr. Seward about an unfortunate case that occurred back in 1896.


message 2: by Lisa (new)

Lisa | 3 comments If the story has some elements that make it original, it doesn't bother me. There isn't any vampire story written in this century that doesn't pay homage to Bram Stoker, whether directly or indirectly, but I'm not sure how I feel about poor Jane Austen being trotted out in a hybrid of sea monster/zombie themes.


message 3: by Danielle The Book Huntress , Jamesian Enthusiast (new)

 Danielle The Book Huntress  (gatadelafuente) | 1347 comments Mod
Yeah, I think the mixups (is that what they call them), can go either way. I admit, I have to check out Jane Slayre and Little Women and Werewolves, just out of curiosity, b/c I love those books. :)


message 4: by Lisa (new)

Lisa | 3 comments My only objection to the hybrids is that the authors whose work has been appropriated for this purpose have no say in the matter. Their novels have fallen into public domain and are no longer protected by copyright, and as a result, their work is fair game. I can't help but wonder how Jane Austen would feel about Mr. Darcy being a vampire, or Pride and Prejudice being overrun by zombies. Austen might have laughed at the concept and said, "cool!" but then again, she might be rolling over in her grave, too.


message 5: by Tressa (new)

Tressa  (moanalisa) I hate this fad and hope it passes soon.


message 6: by Danielle The Book Huntress , Jamesian Enthusiast (new)

 Danielle The Book Huntress  (gatadelafuente) | 1347 comments Mod
I prefer original writing, myself. I like seeing an author come up with her own story that incorporates myths/characters from the public domain, giving it a new spin.

I like a good homage.


Mike (the Paladin) (thepaladin) | 212 comments I admit I don't have anything against it in principle, but so far I can't think of an example where it's been done well. As in the recent "Dracula" "pastiche" or possibly "rip off" by Elrod (yes I'm aware of the relation), that owes more to the movie "Bram Stoker's Dracula" (which actually bears no resemblance Bram Stoker's, "Dracula") than it does to Stoker's book...

Sorry carried away. As I said, I don't object to the idea, but in every example I can think of, it's been a terrible mistake.


message 8: by Danielle The Book Huntress , Jamesian Enthusiast (last edited Sep 21, 2010 05:57AM) (new)

 Danielle The Book Huntress  (gatadelafuente) | 1347 comments Mod
All opinions are appreciated. There are a few books that actually feature real folks and important characters that I seem to want to read, such as:

Shadows Bend A Novel of the Fantastic and Unspeakable by David Barbour Has Lovecraft and RE Howard as main characters

The Arcanum by Thomas Wheeler Has Lovecraft, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Marie Laveau, and Harry Houdini

The Nimble Man (The Menagerie, #1) by Christopher Golden also has Doyle, and Lilith as main characters.

Anno Dracula by Kim Newman is self-explanatory

The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, Vol. 1 by Alan Moore Has Allen Quatermain, Mina Harker, Captain Nemo, Dr. Jekyll/Mr. Hyde, The Invisible Man as main characters

I'll post more when they come to me....


message 9: by Danielle The Book Huntress , Jamesian Enthusiast (last edited Oct 27, 2010 06:12PM) (new)

 Danielle The Book Huntress  (gatadelafuente) | 1347 comments Mod
The Hellboy comics and books are great for a fan of old school horror, dark mythology and folklore. Mike Mignola knows his stuff. If you haven't checked these, I highly recommend them. I became a fan of Hellboy via the first movie, which has some very prominent Lovecraftian elements, IMHO. Today I rewatched Blood and Iron, which is the second animated Hellboy adventure on DVD. Any other fans of Hellboy on here?


message 10: by Kurt (new)

Kurt Reichenbaugh (kurtreichenbaugh) | 54 comments Your list reminded me of another: Lovecraft, Lester Dent, Walter Gibson and L. Ron Hubbard were the heroes of The Chinatown Death Cloud Peril. Not horror, but pulp. I thought it was well done.


message 11: by Danielle The Book Huntress , Jamesian Enthusiast (new)

 Danielle The Book Huntress  (gatadelafuente) | 1347 comments Mod
Thanks, Kurt. I'll look into that book.


message 12: by Martha (new)

Martha (hellocthulhu) | 325 comments Mod
Lady Danielle "The Book Huntress" wrote: "The Hellboy comics and books are great for a fan of old school horror, dark mythology and folklore. Mike Mignola knows his stuff. If you haven't checked these, I highly recommend them. I became a ..."

You know I am! I love the comics, movies, and animated films. I haven't read any of the Hellboy novels yet but I want to. I totally agree with the 1st movie being strongly Lovecraftian. That's probably why I loved it so much! I have also read about half the BPRD comics, they are hit or miss, IMO. I think the original Hellboy comics are better, although I do like seeing what Abe's doing.


message 13: by Danielle The Book Huntress , Jamesian Enthusiast (last edited Oct 28, 2010 06:12AM) (new)

 Danielle The Book Huntress  (gatadelafuente) | 1347 comments Mod
I've only read one BRPD, The Dead. I really liked it. I can imagine Hellboy is better. He's a very dynamic figure. :)


message 14: by Justin (new)

Justin (justinbienvenue) | 80 comments I'm actually considering writing a horror novel that will either be based during the Victorian era and have that old vintage feel or write in the modern day and incorporate classic themes and settings. I am leaning more toward just setting it back in the day so the feeling and representation is more authentic rather than setting it in modern times and coating it with old themes.


message 15: by Danielle The Book Huntress , Jamesian Enthusiast (new)

 Danielle The Book Huntress  (gatadelafuente) | 1347 comments Mod
I love modern versions of classic horror.


message 16: by Alan (new)

Alan Toner | 20 comments Although I love it when classic monsters like Dracula show up occasionally in modern horror books, I HATE it when they play down the original horror aspect of the character and make him a slushy, pinup, Twilight-type.


Mike (the Paladin) (thepaladin) | 212 comments Gak...me to. Vamps are like the monster of monsters in folklore from the past and they've been turned into sparkly, romantic, love interests.


message 18: by Alan (new)

Alan Toner | 20 comments Mike (the Paladin) wrote: "Gak...me to. Vamps are like the monster of monsters in folklore from the past and they've been turned into sparkly, romantic, love interests."

I totally agree with you. It's pathetic the way they have watered down the traditional vampire's fright factor now. I would never buy a vampire novel now because of this. Vampires should be SCARY, not soppy.


message 19: by Justin (new)

Justin (justinbienvenue) | 80 comments I like it if it's done correctly and respectively. You don't want to stick Dracula in a Romance or Action story without any logic or reason.


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