Books on the Nightstand discussion

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What books are you curious, yet uncertain, about reading?

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message 1: by Tenoko1 (last edited Sep 15, 2010 11:39AM) (new)

Tenoko1 What books are you curious to read, even if a little bit unsure? It sounds like it could be really interesting, but you're taking a chance of really not liking it, either because the subject content is taboo or unlike your usual reads? We all talk about what we're currently reading or have read or will read next. What about the curious uncertains?

My current one is Forbidden  by Tabitha Suzuma Forbidden.

The content itself is risque enough, but the rave reviews make me truly curious to see what the fuss is all about. It lists you can buy a 'Definitions' version of it, but I'm not sure what that means, and big chain bookstores say the book isn't even out yet. Which makes me curious how all the reviewers got their hands on the story to begin with, though I see this a lot on here: people writing reviews for books not even out yet. But that is neither here nor there.


message 2: by Libby (new)

Libby (libbyw) | 131 comments Misty wrote: "Which makes me curious how all the reviewers got their hands on the story to begin with, though I see this a lot on here: people writing reviews for books not even out yet."

Hi, Misty, book reviewers and book stores receive advance reading copies which are trade paperback sized versions of a book. As the name indicates, they come out before a book is published or released in hard back.


message 3: by Tenoko1 (new)

Tenoko1 Libby wrote: "Hi, Misty, book reviewers and book stores receive advance reading copies which are trade paperback sized versions of a book. As the name indicates, they come out before a book is published or released in hard back."

Hm. How does a person become a reviewer or get an advanced bookstore copy?


message 4: by Eric (new)

Eric | 1175 comments Mod
My current one is Forbidden

You're on your own there...the description sounds like creepy, prurient porn.


message 5: by Tenoko1 (last edited Sep 16, 2010 08:28AM) (new)

Tenoko1 lol All the people that have read it say it isn't like that, that it's really emotional and bittersweet, and that the sexual side of it is actually very chaste.

It sounds like one of those stories that from the beginning you know a character is doomed and yet they fight their hardest and you find yourself cheering for them and hoping... aaaand then it gets to the end, they die like you both knew they would, and yet you're still as heartbroken as though you never saw it coming, because you're so dissappointed.


message 6: by Tenoko1 (last edited Sep 16, 2010 11:47AM) (new)

Tenoko1 I'm also curious to read Pegasus by Robin McKinley Pegasus by Robin McKinley.

That's always been an idea of mine, to incorporate a story with a girl and a pegasus, and possibly an impossible love between them, either because he is cursed into the form or whatever. But it would be so difficult to write, though that is part of the appeal. Ha ha. I think I just learned something about myself. I like the stories where the romance is seemingly impossible or doomed from the beginning. Or perhaps it's just my Beauty and the Beast/ Phantom of the Opera obsession rearing it's head again. I like cursed characters, he he.


message 7: by Eric (new)

Eric | 1175 comments Mod
to incorporate a story with a girl and a pegasus, and possibly an impossible love between them

I'm keeping a close eye on you people.


message 8: by Tenoko1 (new)

Tenoko1 Eric wrote: "to incorporate a story with a girl and a pegasus, and possibly an impossible love between them

I'm keeping a close eye on you people."


lol I've given cause for concern, huh?


message 9: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (tracemick) | 217 comments Misty wrote: "Eric wrote: "to incorporate a story with a girl and a pegasus, and possibly an impossible love between them

I'm keeping a close eye on you people."

lol I've given cause for concern, huh?"


Both of those books sound interesting to me! I don't usually find myself uncertain about reading a book. I think if the genre is not what I usually read, I may pause but as long as the story sounds interesting, I'll give it a shot. If only I could be more of a risk taker in other parts of my life. :)


message 10: by Vanessa (new)

Vanessa | 330 comments I'm so finicky about what I will read. I always research before I decide on a book.

I've been curious about Franzen's The Corrections for a while but it's long (I have a weird thing about long books--if I don't really like it, the agony is prolonged.) Also, it gets mentioned in the same breath as Don DeLillo, an author I have no intention of reading again. But a friend swears it is brilliant.

Two other long books I vacillate on is Harlot's Ghost: A Novel and the possibly too abstruse for the likes of me Infinite Jest.

Can't say I'm rushing to read the unicorn romance though, Missy. You certainly have a knack for finding unique literature though :)


message 11: by Loretta (new)

Loretta (lorettalucia) | 136 comments The Outlander series by Diana Gabaldon has been on the periphery of my mind for years, but I'm afraid to pull the trigger for a few reasons: a) I might love it, and then there's the commitment of reading all the books, which is a LOT; b) I might love the first one, but then grow disenchanted with a series that seems like it's been going on forever (perhaps too long?); c) since the series has been going so long, I wonder if it will ever end (or has it already? I haven't done that much research...) and if the author has the ending mapped out, etc, etc.


message 12: by Vanessa (new)

Vanessa | 330 comments Lots of people seem to like the Outlander series. I tried to read the first book once and didn't get very far. It reminded me of the romance novels I read in 9th grade. I can only guess or hope that it improves but I've been kind of reluctant to try again yet still curious if I missed something.


message 13: by Eric (new)

Eric | 1175 comments Mod
Speaking of stuff like the Outlander series, or Eat, Pray, Love: as a guy, there are certain books that have an aura of "chick-book" about them. And as such I wouldn't necessarily want to be seen reading them.

And this is coming from a guy who's an unapologetic Jane Austen fan.


message 14: by Kay (new)

Kay | 9 comments The first two books of the Outlander series was enough for me. I liked the first one, but the second was too "romance novel" for my taste. Reminded me a bit of the the Angelique novels I read lo so long ago.


message 15: by Pam (new)

Pam Lauman | 99 comments Oh I absolutely loved the Angelique series. I still have them all. I haven't read Outlander yet but heard Diana Galbadon speak at the National Book Festival and she was hilarious. Listen to her if you get a chance.


message 16: by Linda (new)

Linda | 2753 comments Mod
I first learned about the Outlander series through a fellow teacher - and a student (and as a Special Ed teacher, we didn't have many students who willingly read). I had to pass through Janice's segment of the divided room to my cubicle. At the end of the day she'd have her feet propped on her desk detoxing by reading. Whenever I'd pass through, I'd ask, "What you reading?" She'd answe, "A romance." I'd turn up my nose.

One of those "romances" was Outlander. That and the fact that a student was reading an 800+ page book AND I had no trouble selling them on eBay - I tried one and got hooked.

They aren't just romance, although there is that (and I skim those parts) they are fantastic historical fiction.

This is the book I usually take to NYC since I only have to have the one rather than a suitcase full. On one trip, I visited my cousin in the WTC. She had a word-a-day calendar with the word gardyloo on it. Shortly after I left her, that word was in the volume I was reading (It's what was called before the black water was thrown out the window.) Then a little later I came across my way-back great grandmother who helped Bonnie Prince Charlie in his quest for the throne - Flora McDonald.

I'm sold! And yes, Gabladon is a hoot to hear.


message 17: by wynter (new)

wynter (wynterkm) | 2 comments I was going to start a new thread asking for recommendations, but then realized that my request fit perfectly into this thread...

So: I am very curious, but definitely uncertain, about Stephen King. He has written a lot of books and it's kind of intimidating knowing where to start. Additionally, a lot of his books would be categorized as horror, which is not a genre that I typically read. I tend to be one of those people who scare easily, so I've stayed away from King for years, but he's such a popular writer I think it's time to give him a chance.

That said, help please! Which should I start with? I think I've decided against Carrie, Cujo and It, but other than that I'm open to suggestions.


message 18: by Eric (new)

Eric | 1175 comments Mod
I'd go with The Stand, Salem's Lot, or The Shining. Can't go wrong there.


message 19: by Ann (new)

Ann (akingman) | 2097 comments Mod
My Stephen King recommendation for wkm: Different Seasons. It's a collection of 4 stories -- almost novellas, actually -- and fabulous. They are not overwritten, as much of King's work can be, and they really make you think.

I also loved The Stand (though I only read the original "abridged" version, but I still think of that as different some some of his straight up horror.

The Shining is an excellent example of King's horror books. It's hard to separate the book from the film images that we all know, but it's a worthy read.


message 20: by [deleted user] (new)

I think this would be an excellent topic for an episode ....

I was curious about reading such lighthearted classics as Ulysses and In Search of Lost Time (Remembrance of Things Past): Proust 6-packso I just did. Was it pleasant? Not all the time. But it makes me look good to say I've read them :-)

I am curious to read
The Hunger Gamestrilogy, but that is totally outside my reading comfort zone and I'm not ready yet to take the risk.


message 21: by Eric (new)

Eric | 1175 comments Mod
I would think that if you've read Joyce and Proust (as I also have), there would be no barrier of difficulty in reading anything, since those writers, along with some poets and maybe Pynchon, are the most challenging the English language has to offer. The only difficulty would be whether or not you could sustain an interest in the material.

That having been said, The Hunger Games is about as accessible as can be. Suzanne, what specifically do you think your difficulty would be?


message 22: by [deleted user] (new)

Eric wrote: "I would think that if you've read Joyce and Proust (as I also have), there would be no barrier of difficulty in reading anything, since those writers, along with some poets and maybe Pynchon, are t..."

The subject matter. Dystopia is not normally my cup of tea.


message 23: by Violinknitter (new)

Violinknitter | 4 comments Misty wrote: "I'm also curious to read Pegasus by Robin McKinleyPegasus by Robin McKinley.

That's always been an idea of mine, to incorporate a story with a girl and a pegasus, ..."


I loved Pegasus, and plan to reread it before the second book comes out next year. Warning: it ends on an awful cliffhanger, so if you don't want to be left dangling for months, you might want to wait to read it.

The main pegasus character isn't cursed, but there's a lot of tension and communication problems between the humans and the pegasi. The world-building in the book is fabulous. Some people think it moves slowly, but I like the way McKinley takes time to set up her world and its characters.


message 24: by Louise (new)

Louise | 279 comments Vanessa wrote: "I'm so finicky about what I will read. I always research before I decide on a book.

I've been curious about Franzen's The Corrections for a while but it's long (I have a weird thing..."


I'm reading The Corrections at the moment, I hesitated, I'm very unsure about whether to read writers like Franzen and Jonathan Safran Foer, but this is for my book club, so he's getting a chance.

I'm on page 211, so far it's ok, but a little too "dysfunctional modern family" for my taste - all the characters are very agonizing to be around.
I guess have a hard time if the characters are too caricatured. But we'll see! :-)


message 25: by Julie (new)

Julie M (woolyjooly) | 269 comments Agree, Louise. Franzen is just too . . dysfunctional. He may be a very good writer with insight into modern relationships/society, but I just didn't enjoy his earlier book, and have avoided the newer one (the title of which I've already forgotten . .) A book like Emma Donoghue's "Room" was very, very good, I thought. Not a light topic, but with believable, interesting characters that made the story ultimately satisfying.


message 26: by Normandy (new)

Normandy (bookwitch69) I got a Nook for Christmas and these are the books I am thinking of getting. The Night Strangers by Chris Bohjalian The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo (Millennium, #1) by Stieg Larsson The Help by Kathryn Stockett


message 27: by Elizabeth☮ (new)

Elizabeth☮ i am always curious about any book that begins a series, but i am always reluctant to pick one up. i hate to get roped into a series and feel so obligated to read all books in the series whether they are good or bad.


message 28: by Janet (new)

Janet (justjanet) | 790 comments Elizabeth wrote: "i am always curious about any book that begins a series, but i am always reluctant to pick one up. i hate to get roped into a series and feel so obligated to read all books in the series whether th..."

Ditto....I despise series because there is always at least one weak book and that keeps me from better reading. Somehow though I always end up getting pulled into them.
I'd say the number one book I'm curious about is

The Art of Fielding because I pretty much dislike all sports but people keep telling me this book is not really about baseball. Not sure I want to invest the time to find out.


message 29: by Gerald (new)

Gerald Miller | 807 comments Janet wrote: "Elizabeth wrote: "i am always curious about any book that begins a series, but i am always reluctant to pick one up. i hate to get roped into a series and feel so obligated to read all books in the..."
If you consider a book like
Bottom of the 33rd Hope, Redemption, and Baseball's Longest Game by Dan Barry That's a "baseball book" but I the The Art of Fielding is a book were baseball is the core story but its not the story of the book.ger


message 30: by Victoria (new)

Victoria (vicki_c) | 366 comments I have a few books for which my interest is only moderate, but I just picked them up really cheap, so I'm adding them to my pile. One is Life of Pi which I got for $.99 on Amazon a few days ago.

The other - too bad I don't know how to "tag" Ann here like on Facebook - was The Last Werewolf which I scored today on Amazon for $3.99 (Kindle)(look at 100 books under $3.99 if you're interested). I know I won't get the full experience of the cool book jacket described on the podcast, but still - for $3.99!

I also picked up today's Kindle deal of the day, which was Pictures of You for $.99.

Always good to fill up the e-library with some decent choices when the deal is good.


message 31: by Merleiv (new)

Merleiv Ivey | 4 comments Life of Pi is a reading experience that is life changing....


message 32: by Janet (new)

Janet (justjanet) | 790 comments Merleiv wrote: "Life of Pi is a reading experience that is life changing...."

I wasn't overly impressed with it.


message 33: by Dorota (new)

Dorota (readinggirl91) | 7 comments I am really trying to get in the mood for Infinite Jest.


message 34: by Gerald (new)

Gerald Miller | 807 comments Merleiv wrote: "Life of Pi is a reading experience that is life changing...."

Life of Pi was just offered at a discount from Kindle but I failed to download it.Poooh for me.ger


message 35: by Andrew (new)

Andrew (andrewjross) | 1 comments Gerald wrote: "Merleiv wrote: "Life of Pi is a reading experience that is life changing...."

Life of Pi was just offered at a discount from Kindle but I failed to download it.Poooh for me.ger"


If you can, try listening to Life of Pi on the audio. Jeff Woodman's narration is unbelievable. It got me hooked on audiobooks.


message 36: by Leanne (new)

Leanne | 8 comments Loretta wrote: "The Outlander series by Diana Gabaldon has been on the periphery of my mind for years, but I'm afraid to pull the trigger for a few reasons: a) I might love it, and then ..."

Ooh this is exactly how I feel about the Outlander books. The first one has been on my Amazon wishlist for years, but I just can't seem to take the plunge. I think I know I'll really like them want to devour all of them as quickly as possible. I hate how work gets in the way of obsessive reading habits!

I think i'm saving this series for the day when I break a leg and have to spend weeks in bed with nothing to do but read!


message 37: by Ann (new)

Ann (akingman) | 2097 comments Mod
Oh, Leanne, be careful what you wish for! Especially since I may know where you live .... (insert evil cackle here)...


message 38: by Leanne (new)

Leanne | 8 comments I'm looking forward to it! If it doesn't happen naturally I absolutley intend on self sabotage! 6 weeks in bed getting fat and reading sounds like absolute bliss :)


message 39: by Linda (new)

Linda | 2753 comments Mod
Leanne wrote: "I'm looking forward to it! If it doesn't happen naturally I absolutley intend on self sabotage! 6 weeks in bed getting fat and reading sounds like absolute bliss :)"

Been there. Done that! Broken leg and 4 months in bed. Read 60 books in that time. I think that was the start of my keeping track of what I read.


message 40: by Leanne (new)

Leanne | 8 comments Oh dear 4 months that sounds awful :O But still 60 books is pretty impressive. I think we need to all schedule in broken legs and bed rest so we can get through our reading lists!


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