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The Books > Black Moth and sequels?

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Tracy (A Good Novel) Hi, all! I'm a Heyer newbie; I'm just reading my first (Arabella) now.

I had a question I was hoping someone could answer. I got The Black Moth as a free eBook, and it's come to my attention through browsing various Heyers that there seems to be a few sequels to it? Maybe not sequels outright, but stories featuring some of the characters? I know Devil's Cub is one, but I've heard a few different ones have the same characters.

So if anyone could help me out and let me know which ones have the same characters/which order they go in, that would be much appreciated!


message 2: by Christy B, Admin (In Absentia) (last edited Sep 11, 2010 09:53PM) (new)

Christy B (runaway84) | 24 comments Mod
The book These Old Shades per Wikipedia:

These Old Shades is itself a sequel. Heyer's first novel The Black Moth was a melodrama and as a 'sequel' per se would not work in with the plot, she renamed many characters and made them 'shades' of their former selves for These Old Shades.

After These Old Shades is Devil's Cub and then there's An Infamous Army.

These Old Shades, Devil's Cub and An Infamous Army is the Alastair Trilogy.


Tracy (A Good Novel) Thanks so much! That helps a whole lot.


message 4: by Christy B, Admin (In Absentia) (last edited Sep 11, 2010 10:14PM) (new)

Christy B (runaway84) | 24 comments Mod
No problem!

Also, An Infamous Army is a sequel to Regency Buck, as well.

It took me a while to get all this straight.


message 5: by Elcee (new)

Elcee | 13 comments Actually, An Infamous Army is a true historical novel with the emphasis on the battle of Waterloo. As such it features characters who are previously mentioned in both Devil's Cub and Regency Buck. It can't be regarded as a true sequel to These Old Shades except in the sense that the Alastair family and their decendents feature heavily.


message 6: by Christy B, Admin (In Absentia) (last edited Sep 12, 2010 11:55AM) (new)

Christy B (runaway84) | 24 comments Mod
Yes, but it's a part of The Alastair Trilogy Boxed Set: Includes: These Old Shades, Devil's Cub, Infamous Army, which is why I included it.


message 7: by Elcee (new)

Elcee | 13 comments Yes. I'll happily acknowledge that comment. I love the reappearance of Dominic and Mary and their wilful and charming grandchildren. I also love An Infamous Army because the historical research which GH did for that book has been recognized by military experts as being so descriptive of the actual battle that it shows her deep understanding and interpretation tactics of both sides. She must have had such a good brain!


message 8: by Elcee (new)

Elcee | 13 comments Yes, Risa. It's certainly a matter of taste. Both my daughter and my daughter-in-law agree with you and they are die hard Heyer fans.


message 9: by Claire (new)

Claire | 46 comments Well she wrote enough books for everyone to have a favourite.


message 10: by Veronica (new)

Veronica | 108 comments Elcee wrote: "Actually, An Infamous Army is a true historical novel with the emphasis on the battle of Waterloo. As such it features characters who are previously mentioned in both Devil's Cub and Regency Buck...."

Even though it may be called a sequel, it doesn't explain the time line clearly. Given Dominique married Mary in the year 1780, he still cannot have had a grand daughter aged five and twenty in the year 1813. The book did not disappoint me cause Barbara reminded me of Mary and Leonie combined with Dominique's obstinacy. As for the regency buck's characters, it was annoyance beyond forbearance.


message 11: by Karlyne (new)

Karlyne Landrum | 3895 comments I read an Infamous Army back when I loved historical fiction that leaned toward non-fiction. Isn't it funny how tastes change? But the best part of that predilection for historical novels is that it gave me a good grasp of history that I never would have gotten in school. It's nice to have a background to hang stories onto! Having said that, however, I have to confess I don't remember at all that this book was connected with the others! I guess I'll have to re-read it and see how it works for me now.


message 12: by Teresa (new)

Teresa Edgerton (teresaedgerton) | 151 comments One of my biggest problems with An Infamous Army is that Mary and Dominic don't sound like Mary and Dominic (not even older versions of themselves). I wish that they hadn't appeared in the story at all. In fact, it would have been better to leave the Alastair family out of it altogether -- Barbara need not be related to any of the families in other Heyer novels -- and not build up expectations that the story would have the same playful, romantic qualities that we associate with most of her stories.

Taken as a Historical novel, it is exceptional (it made me see the Battle of Waterloo in a whole new way), but as a sequel to TOS and DC it's disappointing.


message 13: by HJ (new)

HJ | 948 comments Teresa wrote: "One of my biggest problems with An Infamous Army is that Mary and Dominic don't sound like Mary and Dominic (not even older versions of themselves). I wish that they hadn't appeared in the story at all..."

I agree with this, albeit with the caveat that I've never managed to finish An Infamous Army so am judging on only part of the book.


message 14: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl (goodreadscomcherylbdale) | 23 comments Christy B wrote: "The book These Old Shades per Wikipedia:

These Old Shades is itself a sequel. Heyer's first novel The Black Moth was a melodrama and as a 'sequel' per se would not work in with the plot, she renam..."


You know, I never thought of this as a reason she changed characters. I figured it was because she was bound to one publisher for character rights to The Black Moth and couldn't carry them over to a new one!

Thanks for posting this! Very interesting!


message 15: by Barbara (new)

Barbara (sema4dogz) | 428 comments Teresa wrote: "One of my biggest problems with An Infamous Army is that Mary and Dominic don't sound like Mary and Dominic (not even older versions of themselves). I wish that they hadn't appeared in the story at..."

Yes I do agree, no real need for the IA version of Mary and Dominic at all. It seems Barbara had to be an Alastair to explain her wayward ways, but she could, I think, have been explained by having some other 'bad blood' family, not necessarily one we had already met. GH could create anything she wantd and have us believe it , so why not?
Also, like many people, I didn't care for Worth and Judith in IA. She was naught but a domesticated shadow of her former self and Worth was , though still commanding, rather tedious.


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