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Writer Q & A (Archived) > Q and A with Aaron Paul Lazar: Sept 11th-12th

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message 1: by A.F. (last edited Sep 11, 2010 06:51AM) (new)

A.F. (scribe77) | 1777 comments Mod
Please welcome Aaron Paul Lazar, a talented mystery writer, author of the LeGarde Mystery series and the Moore Mystery series. In his own words he “writes to soothe his soul”. This author enjoys the Genesee Valley countryside in upstate New York, where his characters embrace life, play with their dogs and grandkids, grow sumptuous gardens, and chase bad guys.

His columns and articles have appeared in numerous publications, including Futures Mystery Anthology Magazine, Absolute Write, Mystery Fiction, and Great Mystery and Suspense magazine. He is also co-owner of a Writer’s Digest Best 101 Websites blog, Murder by 4.

His websites:
http://www.aaronlazar.blogspot.com
http://www.aplazar.gather.com

His Goodreads Profile:
http://www.goodreads.com/user/show/150197

His Books:

LEGARDE MYSTERIES:

Double Forte' A Gus LeGarde Mystery by Aaron Paul Lazar
Double Forte'
Upstaged A Gus LeGarde Mystery by Aaron Paul Lazar
Upstaged
Tremolo cry of the loon by Aaron Paul Lazar
Tremolo: cry of the loon
Mazurka (A Gus LeGarde Mystery) by Aaron Paul Lazar
Mazurka

The next book in the series, Firesong comes out in 2010.
For more information on these books, check out the website: http://www.legardemysteries.com/

MOORE MYSTERIES:

Healey's Cave by Aaron Lazar
Healey's Cave Paperback

Healey's Cave by Aaron Paul Lazar
Healey's Cave Kindle Edition

The next books in the series, One Potato, Blue Potato and For Keeps come out in 2011 and 2012 respectively.
For more information on these books, check out the website: http://www.mooremysteries.com/


message 2: by A.F. (new)

A.F. (scribe77) | 1777 comments Mod
I'm curious, of all possible children's toys, why did you choose a marble as the catalyst for the paranormal aspects in Healey's Cave?


message 3: by Aaron (new)

Aaron Lazar (aaronpaullazar) | 12 comments Hello, A.F. The marble kind of chose me, to tell the truth. One day I was rototilling in my garden, and found this beautiful cat's eye marble. As I stood in the warm breeze and sunshine, I kept wondering about the child who lost it. I imagined a little boy, and wondered if perhaps he'd lost it a very long time ago, maybe even fifty years earlier. Then I wondered how it would be to be able to jump back in time to see him, his life, what he was doing the day he lost it. It wasn't long after that that the idea for Healey's Cave took hold. I never dreamed it would start a whole new series! ;o)


message 4: by A.F. (new)

A.F. (scribe77) | 1777 comments Mod
One of group's members, M.R., wasn't certain he be able to make it, but he asked that his question be posted.
So here it is:
"What do you think of the ebook trend. I know that the physical form of the book will never be replaced completly, but do you think the digital medium is changing publishing? If so then how?"


message 5: by Aaron (new)

Aaron Lazar (aaronpaullazar) | 12 comments M.R. : The eBook trend has been escalating like mad. At first, there were doubts about how well they would be received by readers, and how anyone would make any money on it. Now I think there are no doubts left. Even the big pubs have finally jumped on the eBook wagon. I'm seeing more eBook sales than print right now, as well, which surprises me. I guess it shouldn't, right? It's just so new. :o)


message 6: by Marc (new)

Marc Johnson (marcjohnsonbooks) | 4 comments I'd like to thank you for taking the time to have a discussion with us.

How do you interact with your local bookstores in order to help promote your work?

Are your interactions limited to readings, or do you have means of promotion?

Do you opt for more of an online oriented marketing plan?

Also, do you find it difficult to attract new readers?

Lastly, as someone who would like to get better acquainted with your work, which book would you suggest starting with?

Thank you again and I look forward to your answers.

M


message 7: by Aaron (new)

Aaron Lazar (aaronpaullazar) | 12 comments Hello, Marc. You're most welcome. I usually contact local bookstores myself, introduce myself via an email after talking on the phone, including bio, list of pubbed books, awards, etc. Then I tell them I'm available for events which can be either a talk/Q&A/Reading or combo of the above. It all works. ;o) I do a lot of local promotion (book clubs, libraries, book stores) but also do tons of online promotion - these days, you have to to grow your readership. I find it pretty easy to attract new readers, as long as I'm in front of them! And if you are in that position, with a great cover and book blurb to intrigue them, then it's usually a done deal. (if they like to read!)

Thanks for your great questions, Marc. I'd say you might as well start with Healey's Cave, since it's the newest and the start of a new series. Then, if you like it, you could go to Double Forte' and start from the beginning in LeGarde Mysteries. ;o)


message 8: by A.F. (new)

A.F. (scribe77) | 1777 comments Mod
Aaron, I know many of the details in your books are drawn from your real life. What are your other sources for ideas and inspiration? Have you ever considered writing a story that is far out of your comfort zone?


message 9: by Aaron (new)

Aaron Lazar (aaronpaullazar) | 12 comments My dreams are huge idea makers for me. I wrote a kooky story recently WAY out of my comfort zone - it's here: Anthropomorphism

I also started a new series from a woman's POV - which was a HUGE shift for me! It's called Tall Pines Mysteries, and also includes a bit of psychic connection type paranormalcy.

Maybe one of these days I'll do a romance, or a sci fi!


message 10: by A.F. (new)

A.F. (scribe77) | 1777 comments Mod
Aaron wrote: "My dreams are huge idea makers for me. I wrote a kooky story recently WAY out of my comfort zone - it's here: Anthropomorphism

I also started a new series from a woman's POV - which was a HUGE shi..."


I think you could write a good romance novel.


message 11: by Aaron (new)

Aaron Lazar (aaronpaullazar) | 12 comments You think so, Anita? I appreciate your confidence in me. I feel a certain affinity to Nicholas Spark's story lines - they speak to me, and affect me greatly. I know it's probably a formula now, but each one is very evocative. I started to tear up during the last one, The Last Song. Of course, my father was a music professor who died of lung cancer (not unlike what happened in the story.)


message 12: by A.F. (new)

A.F. (scribe77) | 1777 comments Mod
Aaron wrote: "You think so, Anita? I appreciate your confidence in me. I feel a certain affinity to Nicholas Spark's story lines - they speak to me, and affect me greatly. I know it's probably a formula now, but..."

That's just the sort of romance novel I could see you writing; a quiet contemporary love story.


message 13: by Sheila (new)

Sheila | 97 comments Interesting that you mention Nicholas Sparks. He was the author I thought of when I read Mazurka.

Sorry I missed the discussion. Weekends are always complicated, or should that read life?


message 14: by Aaron (new)

Aaron Lazar (aaronpaullazar) | 12 comments Anita, thank you very much for hosting me this weekend. And Sheila, if you happen to have a question, I'm not going anywhere soon!


message 15: by Sheila (new)

Sheila | 97 comments In that case, yes I do have a question. It's the one I always ask. How did you get from just writing to having so many published books, columns, articles, and co-ownership of a really great blog? I'm assuming like all journeys it took little steps, but from the outside all we see is where you are now.


message 16: by A.F. (new)

A.F. (scribe77) | 1777 comments Mod
You're welcome Aaron, and Sheila do post a question; we don't frown on a straggler or two. Everyone knows about busy schedules.


message 17: by Aaron (new)

Aaron Lazar (aaronpaullazar) | 12 comments Sheila, you're right. Lots of small steps along the way. The first 2-3 years I just wrote books. Lots of books. Then I started wondering about sharing them with the world, and little by little began to explore publishing, promotion, advertising, networking, all the usual aspects of getting out there. I met some wonderful mentors along the way, who suggested that I write articles to help make my platform. Once I started on the articles, it was rather addicting and fun. And Gather.com became one of my best vehicles for meeting great writers and readers and establishing a wonder circle of friends.


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