The Readers Review: Literature from 1714 to 1910 discussion

174 views
The Short Story Salon > Some of My Favorite Short Story Collections & Authors

Comments Showing 1-50 of 119 (119 new)    post a comment »
« previous 1 3

Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.) (captain_sir_roddy) | 1483 comments Mod
I thought I'd share just a brief list of some of my favorite short story collections that I find myself reading and re-reading.

The Country of the Pointed Firs and Selected Short Fiction by Sarah Orne Jewett is wonderful, and one I return to frequently. This was a woman profoundly admired by the young Willa Cather; and, in fact, Jewett told Cather (paraphrasing) 'to stop writing like Henry James, and just tell the story.' Cather was so affected by Jewett's influence that she dedicated her 1913 novel, O' Pioneers to Jewett. This collection of Jewett's short stories is magnificent; they are a quiet, pastoral, lovely and idyllic look at a small slice of Americana in a small Maine sea-side village at the end of the 19th century, and told from the perspective of an unnamed female narrator. Each of these unpretentious little stories just has the feel of something that your grandmother, or great-aunt, would have told you over a bowl of blueberries and cream. Cather included Jewett's writing in with Nathanial Hawthorne's and Mark Twain's as some of of America's most timeless fiction. High praise indeed!

The New York Stories of Edith Wharton by Edith Wharton. Edith Wharton is near the top of the pinnacle of American fiction for me. While I have read all of her novels, I have come to realize that her greatest strength may well be her short stories. They are simply sublime. They definitely pack a punch! And while I reference the New York Review of Books edition here, I have a couple of other collection of her shorts and they are all nothing short of brilliant. She published a volume of ghost stories that are truly some of the best spooky stuff out there. In my opinion, Wharton is one of the masters of the short genre; she grabs you in a page or two, and doesn't let go. When finished with a story, you just lean back in your chair and breathe a low, "Whew!" Yes, she's that good! Wharton's shorts span more than forty years, from the early 1890s until her death in 1937, and reflect her evolving literary style as well as her changing views on society and the lives and relationships of the people living in it. If you read only a sample of Wharton shorts, read Autre Temps, Pomegranate Seed, and Roman Fever.

The Troll Garden: Short Stories by Willa Cather is another of my faves. All six of these short stories are worth reading! This is an exquisite collection of Cather's early writing. Once Cather embarked on writing her novels, she only wrote sixteen more short stories, so these early works are an important window into her maturation as a writer. From this collection, I most especially loved Flavia and Her Artists, A Death in the Desert, and The Marriage of Phaedra. This is a woman who is in touch with the pulse of the people around her in her time. This is very good stuff. As an aside, I am a huge fan of the Victorian poet, Christina Georgina Rossetti, and was quite intrigued to find that Cather uses a stanza from Rossetti's epic poem, Goblin Market, as an epigraph to open the collection.

"We must not look at Goblin men,
We must not buy their fruits;
Who knows upon what soil they fed
Their hungry thirsty roots?"

Like Wharton, Cather is a master at describing, with pathos and drama, the relationships and conflicts between men and women. Each of these stories is crafted with imagination, tension, and poignancy--it is all here. Cather is just brilliant! This is a terrific collection of her short fiction!

The Withered Arm and Other Stories by Thomas Hardy. As many of you know, I have been on a serious Hardy jag of late. Hardy is the bomb! I haven't encountered an author with power like this in some time. The last author that grabbed me like this was Cormac McCarthy for fiction and Christina Rossetti with her poetry. Hardy's short stories are nothing short of amazing. They are macabre, devilish, scary, spooky, bizarre, gut-wrenching, and hauntingly beautiful. There are several superb collections of Hardy's shorts out there, but I strongly recommend that you find and read the following stories: The Withered Arm, Barbara of the House of Grebe, The Son's Veto, The Fiddler of the Reels, An Imaginative Woman, and The Grave by the Handpost.

If you are a fan of poetry, you can find many references to elements from these shorts in Hardy's poetry too. Following on that thought, I have to say that much of Thomas Hardy's poetry reads like short stories too; as much of his poetry has the distinct earthy feel and flavor of the folk tales and ballads he would have heard growing up in southwestern England in the mid-19th century. So, if you want to host a Halloween Party and read some spooky stories aloud, I strongly recommend reading a couple of Hardy stories (and some of his poetry); they'd go well with the Edgar Allen Poe stories (and some rum punches!).

Finally, for humor (and a bit of the macabre), one be hard-pressed to find an author of short fiction that can top Hector Hugh Munro, or 'Saki.' I have his complete collection, entitled Saki. Personally, I love 'em all; but I adore The Chronicles of Clovis, and his Reginald stories, and a whole slew of his individual stories. They are all rather short (i.e., just a few pages), but they pack a wallop. These are quite fun to read aloud at cocktail parties!

So, what short story collections do you own and like to read?


message 2: by MadgeUK (new)

MadgeUK | 5214 comments I've got the Country of the Pointed Firs and The Withered Arm somewhere Chris. As you say, the latter has some very macabre tales in it - I must find it and read something to my grandchildren at Halloween, when I put my witches' hat with the purple hair on! (What! You say I wear a witches hat and have purple hair all the time - how dare you!:O)


Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.) (captain_sir_roddy) | 1483 comments Mod
MadgeUK wrote: "I've got the Country of the Pointed Firs and The Withered Arm somewhere Chris. As you say, the latter has some very macabre tales in it - I must find it and read something to my grandchildren at Ha..."

*wink, wink* 'Now, Madge, my dear, would I ever say something like that?' *wink, wink* ;-)


message 4: by Jan (new)

Jan (auntyjan) | 483 comments Just yesterday I finally got my thermo-plastic cast off my broken arm. The doctor told me that the butterfly piece had not reunified and probably won't, but it's not too bad because new bone has grown on the other side of the break to strengthen it. So here's me with a piece of dead bone floating in my arm and now all this talk about the withered arm! Madge! Can I borrow the sedan chair please! I need to sit down...perhaps we could do that book next year?*laughs*


message 5: by MadgeUK (last edited Sep 03, 2010 09:17AM) (new)

MadgeUK | 5214 comments Yes, and I'll loan you my butler too Jan:)


message 6: by Jan (new)

Jan (auntyjan) | 483 comments And the chef, please....and are they young and handsome by any chance?


message 7: by MadgeUK (new)

MadgeUK | 5214 comments Oh very - I wouldn't have them any other way:D.


message 8: by [deleted user] (new)

Among the books on my bedside table is Circle Games by Jo Mazelis. Her first collection of stories was published in 2002 and is entitled Diving Girls and I would commend it to all short story fans.


message 9: by Jan (new)

Jan (auntyjan) | 483 comments Sounds interesting, and thankfully no mention of withered arms there.
By the way Madge, thanks for the eye-candy!


message 10: by Historybuff93 (new)

Historybuff93 | 287 comments Some of my favorite short story collections:

The Complete Short Stories of Ernest Hemingway
I just love his writing style. Hemingway has also been an influence on my own writing. Just a few of my many favorites are A Clean, Well-Lighted Place, The Snows of Kilimanjaro, The Short, Happy Life of Francis Macomber, and Hills Like White Elephants.

The Collected Fictions of Jorge Luis Borges
I like how Borges can mix philosophy in with great writing. He was also an all-around great writer too.

The Essential Tales and Poems of Edgar Allan Poe
Poe was one of my first favorite writer. Favorites from this are The Pit and the Pendulum, Ligiea, The Black Cat, The System of Dr. Tarr and Professor Fether, and so many more.

Dubliner - James Joyce
It's just amazing. That's all I really have to say. The stream of consciousness in this period of Joyce is my favorite. My favorite stories are Araby, The Sisters, A Little Cloud, A Painful Case, and The Dead.

I have a collection of Kafka stories--not the complete though--but I forgot the name. My favortie Kafka story is In the Penal Colony.

Ward no.6 and Other Stories - Anton Chekhov

The Things They Carried - Tim O'Brien
I finished it a couple days ago, while on a long car trip. O'Brien has captured so much on the subject about the Vietnam War, war in general, and the soldiers (both during and after) that fought the war.

As you can tell, I really like short stories.:)


message 11: by MadgeUK (new)

MadgeUK | 5214 comments Don't forget we are reading stories from 1800-1910 here Hbuff - some of these would be OK and we have one or two Chekhov fans here. I congratulate you on tackling James Joyce - many people are not happy with stream of consciousness writing although I must confess I love his work.


message 12: by Historybuff93 (last edited Sep 08, 2010 01:27PM) (new)

Historybuff93 | 287 comments Thanks for reminding me about that, Madge. I also love Joyce's writing--Finnegans Wake being the only work I haven't read yet. Not to get off the subject of 1800-1910 very much, what do you think of Ulysses? I found it to be a challenging, but very interesting work.


Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.) (captain_sir_roddy) | 1483 comments Mod
Historybuff93 wrote: "Thanks for reminding me about that, Madge. I also love Joyce's writing--Finnegans Wake being the only work I haven't read yet. Not to get off the subject of 1800-1910 very much, what do you think o..."

I will confess that Ulysses utterly and convincingly defeated me. I tried to read that *&%#(^@ novel probably 10-12 times over the course of my adult life, and have hurled more than my fair share of copies of Ulysses against the closest wall. I do not now own a copy of Ulysses, nor shall I EVER buy a copy, or accept one from some well-meaning friend.

Personally, I think Joyce is 'bats**t' crazy! Don't even mention Finnegan's Wake! Strictly my humble opinion, but I think that Finnegan's Wake is a massive literary fraud perpetrated by Joyce on the 'literati' of his time.

This is pure evil, but every time I encounter a copy of Finnegan's Wake in a bookstore (used or new), I turn it around, and slide it back into its slot with the spine against the back of the shelf. It somehow becomes more intelligible this way. (I told you it was an evil thing I do). LOL! Cheers! Chris


message 14: by [deleted user] (new)

Christopher wrote: "Historybuff93 wrote: "Thanks for reminding me about that, Madge. I also love Joyce's writing--Finnegans Wake being the only work I haven't read yet. Not to get off the subject of 1800-1910 very muc..."

You are my twin!!!!! :D (well not the Finnegan's Wake bookstore thing, but all the rest of it!)


message 15: by MadgeUK (new)

MadgeUK | 5214 comments LOL. I love all of Joyce and have done so since I was young. He is so Irish! Have you ever heard his work read Chris? You might get a different perspective that way. I once had an Irish lover who read him to me:O. Can you understand the dialect in this Ulysses soliquoy?:-

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yNTlDe...

Finnegans Wake is so poetic - I am surprised you do not like it:-

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JAc901...

Many authors are bats - it makes their work even better:D:D.


message 16: by Historybuff93 (last edited Sep 08, 2010 02:05PM) (new)

Historybuff93 | 287 comments Chris,

I once read a few lines from the unmentionable book, and I found that I couldn't even understand it. Your bookstore shenanigans don't make Joyce happy--he rolls in his Swiss grave. Quite evil. Almost as bad as book burning. LOL.

I know what you mean about despising an author. I have the same feelings towards Jane Austen, sorry Austen fans. I just don't see her as being a great writer. I tried Pride and Prejudice once. It was almost too much to finish it. Perhaps some day I should revisit that place of untold horror and boredom. LOL.


message 17: by Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.), Founder (last edited Sep 08, 2010 02:11PM) (new)

Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.) (captain_sir_roddy) | 1483 comments Mod
MadgeUK wrote: "LOL. I love all of Joyce and have done so since I was young. He is so Irish! Have you ever heard his work read Chris? You might get a different perspective that way. I once had an Irish lover wh..."

Madge, I love you very much, but 'that road will remain less traveled', especially by me! Having said that though, I do have a long-time friend who swears that reading it aloud is truly one of the tools to use.

Regarding the Irish poetic voice, I love it. For example, I am an unabashed fan of the poetry of William Butler Yeats. I 'get' him. I simply don't 'get' Joyce.


message 18: by MadgeUK (last edited Sep 08, 2010 02:25PM) (new)

MadgeUK | 5214 comments My paternal grandmother was from near Dublin and a little 'bats' so I grew up listening to the dialect and the poetic language which many Celts use as a matter of course, especially when cross or drunk! Yeats is much more civilised than Joyce and middle class, not working class, which makes a lot of difference. He was also a Protestant and Joyce was a Catholic and that makes a difference to Irish writing.


message 19: by Jan (new)

Jan (auntyjan) | 483 comments Chris and Madge, I have to tell you that I absolutely adore Jane Austen and Pride and Prejudice is my favourite book of all time. Her use of irony,her wit her character portrayals,her depiction of the social difficulties faced by women of her era...and of course,Mr Darcy(who captured my heart long ago)...unrivalled. Even the first sentence...'It is a truth universally acknowledged that a single man in possession of a large fortune must be in want of a wife.'...dripping with irony,right there...she's sending up all those mothers that immediately start hatching marriage plans for their daughters the minute they spot a wealthy man...still relevant today. And then the father, having his little wry quips to keep himself amused and protect himself from his wife's 'nerves'...it's absolutely hilarious and heartwarming and romantic and I could go on...but do give it another try sometime, Chris.


message 20: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 3582 comments Jan wrote: "Chris and Madge, I have to tell you that I absolutely adore Jane Austen and Pride and Prejudice is my favourite book of all time."

I'm with you there. Madge has often said she finds Austen too prissy and doesn't care for her. But I'm certainly in your corner.


message 21: by Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.), Founder (last edited Sep 08, 2010 07:32PM) (new)

Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.) (captain_sir_roddy) | 1483 comments Mod
Everyman wrote: "Jan wrote: "Chris and Madge, I have to tell you that I absolutely adore Jane Austen and Pride and Prejudice is my favourite book of all time."

I'm with you there. Madge has often said she finds A..."


Oh, I am a huge Janeite! I am not sure what gave you the indication I was not. I was expressing significant issues with James Joyce earlier today, and I think somebody said that they disliked Austen in the same fashion.

I adore Austen's novels! My all-time favorite is Persuasion (just the best love story), followed by Mansfield Park (lovely complex plot), Emma (maybe the most perfectly written novel), and then Sense and Sensibility and Pride and Prejudice (drop-dead funny). Northanger Abbey is the one I struggle with; sometimes I dig it, but mostly it is 'meh.'

I hope we've cleared this matter up! ;-)


message 22: by [deleted user] (new)

Christopher wrote: "Everyman wrote: "Jan wrote: "Chris and Madge, I have to tell you that I absolutely adore Jane Austen and Pride and Prejudice is my favourite book of all time."

I'm with you there. Madge has often..."


Yay! Lots of Austen lovers!! Persuasion and P&P top my list. Which one comes first depends on my mood.


message 23: by Historybuff93 (new)

Historybuff93 | 287 comments You were thinking of my post, Jan, on disliking Austen.


message 24: by Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.), Founder (last edited Sep 08, 2010 07:50PM) (new)

Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.) (captain_sir_roddy) | 1483 comments Mod
Kate wrote: "Christopher wrote: "Everyman wrote: "Jan wrote: "Chris and Madge, I have to tell you that I absolutely adore Jane Austen and Pride and Prejudice is my favourite book of all time."

I'm with you the..."


Well, I'm on a bit of Virginia Woolf kick of late (Madge ;-), so I'm going to share one of my favorite quotes of hers--
"Who would not spout the family teapot in order to talk with Keats for an hour about poetry, or with Jane Austen about the art of fiction?"
Oh, and you have to love the tea pot reference too! ;-)


message 25: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 3582 comments Kate wrote: "Yay! Lots of Austen lovers!! Persuasion and P&P top my list. Which one comes first depends on my mood. "

For me, it's Emma, hands down. Followed fairly closely by Mansfield Park. I like P&P, but it's too predictable and sweet, for me, to be a great book. A great read, yes, but not a great book.


message 26: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 3582 comments Christopher wrote: ""Who would not spout the family teapot in order to talk with Keats for an hour about poetry, or with Jane Austen about the art of fiction?""

That will make more sense to American readers if you understand that to "spout" is English slang for to pawn.


message 27: by [deleted user] (new)

Everyman wrote: "I like P&P, but it's too predictable and sweet, for me, to be a great book. A great read, yes, but not a great book."

Sense and Sensibility is the one that's too sweet and predictable for me. But Emma is probably her best character.


Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.) (captain_sir_roddy) | 1483 comments Mod
Everyman wrote: "Christopher wrote: ""Who would not spout the family teapot in order to talk with Keats for an hour about poetry, or with Jane Austen about the art of fiction?""

That will make more sense to Americ..."


Good catch, Everyman! I had to do a bit of digging about several years ago to figure it out when I first encountered it.


message 29: by Jan (new)

Jan (auntyjan) | 483 comments How did I make that mistake Chris?...I misread message 16 which was from Historybuff 93, addressed to you...I just saw your name and read on, sorry...wasn't quite awake, though I did manage a limerick,which I think you might have missed...in Croissants.....


Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.) (captain_sir_roddy) | 1483 comments Mod
Jan wrote: "How did I make that mistake Chris?...I misread message 16 which was from Historybuff 93, addressed to you...I just saw your name and read on, sorry...wasn't quite awake, though I did manage a limer..."

I did see your limerick, and Loved it! And you know I was teasing you about Austen too, Jan! I have no doubt that we'll do an Austen in this group, and that we'll have a marvelous time with it too. Cheers!


message 31: by MadgeUK (last edited Sep 08, 2010 11:45PM) (new)

MadgeUK | 5214 comments I appreciate Austen's irony but prefer the more descriptive writing of, say, Bronte and Hardy. Austen herself said that 'the little bit (two inches wide) of ivory on which I work with so fine a brush as produces little effect after much labour' and I like the bolder brush strokes of braver authors. But I am happy to read her here for the irony alone. (Running now......)


message 32: by [deleted user] (new)

MadgeUK wrote: "I like bolder brush strokes of braver authors."

If you want florid, Madge, I'm sure we could dig up some Ann Radcliffe for you. ;)


message 33: by MadgeUK (new)

MadgeUK | 5214 comments I'm not too keen on florid gothic Kate, especially of that period. I like Austen's spoof on it in Northanger Abbey though.


message 34: by [deleted user] (new)

MadgeUK wrote: "I'm not too keen on florid gothic Kate, especially of that period. I like Austen's spoof on it in Northanger Abbey though."

I know, I was just baiting you. I'm pretty sure you'd classify Mrs. Radcliffe as prime brain rotting material. :) Humor just doesn't translate well in little internet snippets. :):)


message 35: by MadgeUK (last edited Sep 09, 2010 01:25AM) (new)

MadgeUK | 5214 comments I realise you were teasing Kate - no, smileys aren't much good for conveying subtle humour:). I used it as a tag to say that I did like some Austen, thereby, hopefully, saving my skin:D.

Read in the context of the time and realising that Radcliffe was breaking new ground, I quite appreciated Udolpho. In fact I read part of it on my e-reader as I was travelling through the Alps on a coach a couple of years ago. That same coach played a video of the Sound of Music and that was really surreal!


message 36: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 3582 comments MadgeUK wrote: "I like the bolder brush strokes of braver authors."

Braver? I don't think so. The Brontes had each other to support their writing, and their father encouraged them, so it took no courage for them to write. Austen had to hide her writing for fear of familial disapproval or even forbidding, but went ahead with it anyhow. Now that's brave for a woman who was totally dependent financially on her family.


message 37: by MadgeUK (new)

MadgeUK | 5214 comments The fact that the Brontes had to use pseudonyms shows that there were problems in women writing at all and the Bronte family were desperately poor whereas Austen came from a middle-class background. The Brontes also tackled controversial subjects with much more gusto than Austen and that is more the bravery I meant. But I don't want to get into a Janeite argument amongst Janeites. There was bravery on both sides because they were all women at a time when women's lives were difficult.


Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.) (captain_sir_roddy) | 1483 comments Mod
MadgeUK wrote: "The fact that the Brontes had to use pseudonyms shows that there were problems in women writing at all and the Bronte family were desperately poor whereas Austen came from a middle-class background..."

Madge, your comment "There was bravery on both sides because they were all women at a time when women's lives were difficult" is absolutely the pertinent point here. It always just shocks me when I read what women could do and couldn't do in those days. I think that what I most love about the Brontes, and Gaskell too, is that they are a 'voice' for women and put these issues front and center.

Read "Villette," "The Tenant of Wildfell Hall," or even "Shirley"; or Gaskell's "North and South" and "Sylvia's Lovers." Those will rock you back on your heels when one realizes what women had to cope with. Tougher, hard-edged, in-your-face, and down-in-the-dirt reality.

Sure, Austen addressed property ownership issues, education issues, etc.; but it was done in a very different fashion, and tended to be subtle, gentle, and non-confrontational. Just my opinion (and it is NOT a criticism), but 'most' people who read Austen, read her because they like the 'romance' elements of the plots and admire Austen's technical craft of writing; but not to dig around for some deeper social or cultural message associated with Georgian/Regency England.

Having said all of this, I must proffer that it always puts one on extremely 'thin ice' to discuss Austen in just about any fashion; therefore I am going to stop digging, put the shovel carefully down, and very quietly fade off into the sunset (whistles softly as he walks off and over the hill).


message 39: by MadgeUK (new)

MadgeUK | 5214 comments So true. I very much admire Austen's writing skill and admit that in Mansfield Park, for instance, she tackled social issues more bravely. (Walking over the same hill, wearing a red hat and singing protest songs....).


message 40: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 3582 comments Christopher wrote: "Having said all of this, I must proffer that it always puts one on extremely 'thin ice' to discuss Austen in just about any fashion;"

Not at all. Praising her effusively and without reservation keeps you on extremely thick ice and safe from any criticism or hostility.


message 41: by [deleted user] (new)

Everyman wrote: "Not at all. Praising her effusively and without reservation keeps you on extremely thick ice and safe from any criticism or hostility."

Depending, of course, whose pond you're skating on. :)


message 42: by Jan (new)

Jan (auntyjan) | 483 comments 'It is a strange world of language in which skating on thin ice can get you into hot water.'...Franklin P. Jones.


message 43: by Historybuff93 (new)

Historybuff93 | 287 comments Has anyone here read Bartleby the Scrivener by Melville?


message 44: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 3582 comments Historybuff93 wrote: "Has anyone here read Bartleby the Scrivener by Melville?"

Many years ago.


Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.) (captain_sir_roddy) | 1483 comments Mod
Historybuff93 wrote: "Has anyone here read Bartleby the Scrivener by Melville?"

Many, many, many years ago. ;-)


message 46: by Jan (new)

Jan (auntyjan) | 483 comments Not in this lifetime.


message 47: by Rosemary (new)

Rosemary | 180 comments Chris, I just wanted to say I love The Country of the Pointed Firs as well. My husband grew up in that area of Maine. I ended up reading the book while away in the South Pacific for what ended up being a miserable class trip. I huddled away in a corner and read Sarah Orne Jewett and was homesick . . .


Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.) (captain_sir_roddy) | 1483 comments Mod
S. Rosemary wrote: "Chris, I just wanted to say I love The Country of the Pointed Firs as well. My husband grew up in that area of Maine. I ended up reading the book while away in the South Pacific for what ended up b..."

They really are quite wonderful, aren't they? My oldest daughter, Amber, was the one that turned me onto Jewett. She really does have very good taste, if I may say so. ;-)


message 49: by MadgeUK (new)

MadgeUK | 5214 comments My favourite American stories too:). (Not that I have read all that many American short story collections, not being a lover of short stories.) Last Xmas I made an American friend of mine a set of 12 notecards featuring firs, as a tribute to Jewett's stories.

I found Cather's O Pioneers hauntingly strange.


Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.) (captain_sir_roddy) | 1483 comments Mod
MadgeUK wrote: "My favourite American stories too:). (Not that I have read all that many American short story collections, not being a lover of short stories.) Last Xmas I made an American friend of mine a set of ..."

Oh yes, Madge, I completely agree! That was a novel that knocked me right down. I think it was the first Cather novel that I read, and is still one of my favorites. I just recently found a beautiful hardbound illustrated edition that is virtually brand new. I believe it must have come from an estate sale, as it had the woman's beautiful little nameplate glued inside the cover. Poor soul... But I have given her volume a wonderful new home, safely ensconced on the shelf with all of my other Cather novels.


« previous 1 3
back to top