Martial Arts Fiction discussion

207 views
Which books would you recommend, and why?

Comments Showing 1-42 of 42 (42 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Goran (last edited Aug 16, 2010 07:29AM) (new)

Goran Powell (goranpowell) | 31 comments Mod
Just started reading Blinded by the Night by LA Kane, a lighthearted romp through the supernatural featuring hard-bitten cops, murderous gangs, irresistible nymphs, crusading Senseis and a rag-tag assortment of diobolical undead. Kane brings together martial arts and gothic horror with an enjoyable mix of realistic cop/self defense stuff and outrageous vamps and demons in a thoroughly enjoyable yarn. More later, I'm just getting to a good bit...


message 2: by Charmaigne (new)

Charmaigne | 8 comments I really enjoyed Tengu, but only wish I'd read the other two in the series first, not sure which is first actually but will get round to them at some point!


message 3: by John (new)

John | 9 comments Sensei is the first in the series...a must read for anty serious reader of martial arts fiction :)


message 4: by Bert (new)

Bert Edens (bedens) | 11 comments I really enjoyed the Rain series by Barry Eisler. As a martial artist himself, Eisler mixes in some real-world action to the books, not just the cool stuff you might see on TV. Highly recommended!


message 5: by Goran (new)

Goran Powell (goranpowell) | 31 comments Mod
I read the first one, Rain Fall, and I agree, it was a very cool book!


message 6: by Bert (new)

Bert Edens (bedens) | 11 comments I just completely stumbled across Killer Instinct by Zoe Sharp because of a blurb talking about how the protagonist is a self-defense instructor. I'm not done with the book, and it's not packed with martial arts, but there's plenty in there, and it's pretty realistic. Definitely thinking about hunting for others in the series.


message 7: by Goran (new)

Goran Powell (goranpowell) | 31 comments Mod
The Monkey King's Daughter by T. A. DeBonis

Just read this and was quite taken with it - it's aimed at younger readers, (it says 8+) but it brought back great memories of watching the TV series Monkey as a child! I'm going to try it out on my daugher and see if she likes it!


message 8: by Jason (new)

Jason (jasonseer) The Fifth Profession. It's a genre-bender that features martial arts in a modern context. It's written by David? Morrell, the same guy that wrote the first Rambo book. The Fifth Profession is that of the bodyguard, and the only book by Morrell I liked better was Testament.


message 9: by Charmaigne (last edited Oct 07, 2010 03:28AM) (new)

Charmaigne | 8 comments John wrote: "Sensei is the first in the series...a must read for anty serious reader of martial arts fiction :)"

Hi,

Sorry it's been ages since I last wrote on here.
Thank's for the title John, I will look into getting Sensei.
At the moment I have two books on the go, the first is a thriller which unfortunately does not contain any martial arts. After I plan to read the Monkey King's Daughter as we have it at my local library and it was recommended.

Will definetely read Sensei after.


message 10: by Charmaigne (new)

Charmaigne | 8 comments Goran wrote: "The Monkey King's Daughter by T. A. DeBonis

Just read this and was quite taken with it - it's aimed at younger readers, (it says 8+) but it brought back great memories of watching the TV seri..."
Hi goran,

Thanks for the recommendation, have seen this at my local library so will give it a read after the thriller/detective novel I'm reading at the moment.


message 11: by Goran (new)

Goran Powell (goranpowell) | 31 comments Mod
I owe you BIG TIME!! Hope you enjoy it now!


message 12: by Philip (new)

Philip (rainmaker) | 3 comments I have been reading martial arts fiction for a fair few years now and I always wondered why we haven't seen more or even any movies based on these books!
The Ninja (Eric VanLustbader) is one book I thought immediately could be a movie.

Recently, I "watched' The Cutting Season in my head as I read thinking this could be an amazing movie.

Does anyone know of any movie rights to any of these books? Are there movies in the pipeline?

Thanks,

Philip


message 13: by Goran (new)

Goran Powell (goranpowell) | 31 comments Mod
I agree - i read and enjoyed the Ninja when it first came out (a guilty pleasure!!) and waited.... and waited... for the movie to come out. It would have made a sizzling film. I've heard that Cutting Season and The Connor Burke series by John Donohue are being touted around the movie industry, but i don't know any details. I've recently written a screenplay for 'A Sudden Dawn' which I'm showing to producers at the moment, with some interest, but every moves slowly slowly. It's a good question though. Even classics like the Bourne identity (which wasn't particularly martial arts) took decades to be made into a film.


message 14: by John (new)

John | 9 comments Goran wrote: "I agree - i read and enjoyed the Ninja when it first came out (a guilty pleasure!!) and waited.... and waited... for the movie to come out. It would have made a sizzling film. I've heard that Cutti..."

There has been some discussion about the Connor Burke series being made into a movie or TV series. Sensei was optioned for a movie and there was eve a script written by Matt Nix (Burn Notice) but it never went anywhere. Goran's right--these things seem to take a lot of time and the process is fairly opaque. Best of luck moving A Sudden Dawn to the screen.


message 15: by Sunflower (new)

Sunflower (indeplady) | 12 comments Here's a new great summer read (or anytime)Kage--The Shadow by John Donohue. Just out. This is the fourth of the Connor Burke Martial Arts Thriller and Donohue hits the mark for adventure and excitement as current as today's headlines. It's based on the Southwest border and involves rival border gangs, murder, violence, more. Burke is hired to unravel the mysterious death of writer, Elliot Westmann, and he is led from the scholarly assessment of his works to the investigation of Xochi, a young student of Native cultures. He and his master, Yamashita, follow the leads while weaving in time-honored themes of martial arts--conduct, ordeal, and courage. AND author John Donohue has contest going on GoodReads for a free book.


message 16: by Sunflower (new)

Sunflower (indeplady) | 12 comments Hey Dutch...go for it! And when you are finished go read Lawrence Kane's book, Blinded by the Night. It's full of "things that go bump in the night" as well as an interesting detective that leaves you asking for the sequel.


message 17: by Sunflower (new)

Sunflower (indeplady) | 12 comments I also strongly recommend Cutting Season and Quiet Teacher by Arthur Rosenfeld. Read Cutting Season first. It's a series about Xenon Pearl, a martial artist, knife-wielding, motor cycle riding, nero-surgeon. The adventures hits upon his beef with the Russian mob in Florida, his girlfirend who becomes crippled, and the ghost of his former teacher that reappears to him regularly. It's got more twists and turns...you won't put it down.


message 18: by Loren (new)

Loren Christensen (lorenchristensen) | 30 comments My first novel, published by YMAA Publishers is coming out in a couple months. It's titled:

Dukkha—Eye for an Eye
A Sam Reeves Martial Arts Thriller
by Loren W. Christensen

The 'Eye for an Eye' subtitle is still a working title, though I hope they keep it.

It's the first book of at least three in the series. I'm 310 pages into the follow-up, which they want by November.


message 19: by Sunflower (new)

Sunflower (indeplady) | 12 comments Loren: I can't wait to read this. I'm excited! And a series, no less. Super


message 20: by Goran (new)

Goran Powell (goranpowell) | 31 comments Mod
Looking forward to this one Loren! And I have Kage on its way to me now... summer holiday reading, sorted!!


message 21: by Wuxia (new)

Wuxia Wanderings (guanzhong) | 8 comments Any fans of the Quiller novels here? It's a series of spy thrillers written by Adam Hall. The MC, Quiller, uses martial arts instead of a gun.


message 22: by Loren (new)

Loren Christensen (lorenchristensen) | 30 comments Goran wrote: "I read the first one, Rain Fall, and I agree, it was a very cool book!"

Just saw the movie a couple days ago. It was on Netflix. I heard Barry was embarrassed about it but I thought it was quite good. It's been several years since I read the book but I think the movie followed it at least a little.


message 23: by Loren (new)

Loren Christensen (lorenchristensen) | 30 comments If you compare it to the book—and who wouldn't?—it fails. But if you just want to junk out your brain for a while, it was fair to good. I like Oldman, too, but he was doing an Al Pacino and screaming his lines through most of the movie. The Rain character was not Amerasian, he was too young, and his fighting techniques were the result of quick editing. Actually, the more I talk about it, I have to wonder why I said it was quite good. Make that so-so good if you don't compare it to the book. :-)


message 24: by Loren (new)

Loren Christensen (lorenchristensen) | 30 comments I loved those old '70 chop-socky movies, too. Black Belt theater was on every Sunday here and it was a favorite.

Martial arts movies were in their infancy then, as was the martial arts in general, and for a while those movies added to our mystique.

"Can you fly through the air like those Chinese guys do in the movies?" my naive friend would ask in all seriousness. And of course, I'd set them straight.

"Why, yes. Yes I can."


message 25: by Loren (new)

Loren Christensen (lorenchristensen) | 30 comments Yes, I have it. It IS fantastic.

I've always wondered why Jet Li's directors insist that he uses cables and other CG effects. He's incredibly fast and dynamic but they insist on going the silly route, which really doesn't wow anyone these days.

BTW, I was up for a part in a movie several years ago. It was a Korean made flick that was being filmed here. But before I even got to the set the first day, the lead actor, drunk out of his mind, punched out the director. The lead was put in jail and the director flew back to Korea.

There went my new career.


message 26: by Loren (new)

Loren Christensen (lorenchristensen) | 30 comments Especially if they keep up their skills.

Jackie Chan doesn't appear to be doing so. Of course, he's done so much damage to his body that normal walking will be a challenge for him in a few years.

Same with MMA guys.


message 27: by Wuxia (new)

Wuxia Wanderings (guanzhong) | 8 comments Jackie Chan's still got it. Did you all see Little Big Soldier?


message 28: by Sunflower (new)

Sunflower (indeplady) | 12 comments I just love reading about all the old martial art movies. It's been EXTREMELY hot here in Missouri and so I'm going to get some of these old movies and enjoy them in my air-conditioned home this weekend. Loren your story about your acting career is wonderful to read...thanks for sharing.


message 29: by Loren (new)

Loren Christensen (lorenchristensen) | 30 comments Haven't seen Little Big Soldier, John. I'll check it out. Thanks.

Thanks Barbara. Many years ago I was supposed to do a scene in a Raquel Welch movie, Kansas City Bomber. They wanted me to stand just outside the curve of a roller derby rink so that when an actor whipped a skater into the rail, she would flip over the railing, fly through the air and hit me in the chest with her skate wheels.

When I told them that they were nuts and that I wouldn't do it, they puffed, and said, "We thought you were supposed to be a high-ranking black belt?"

I said, "I am, but that doesn't mean that getting struck in the chest by a 180-pound woman flying through the air and wearing roller skates won't hurt me."

They subsequently decided not to do the scene and once again my movie career—wasn't.


message 30: by Goran (new)

Goran Powell (goranpowell) | 31 comments Mod
And to think you could have gone from being a respected martial arts writer to a superstar, Loren!!

In the words of Maximus in Gladiator: The choices we make today echo in eternity!! :-)


message 31: by Loren (new)

Loren Christensen (lorenchristensen) | 30 comments Always an inch beyond the grasp, Goran.

That's a great quote, though it sounds better when you say it wearing a toga.


message 32: by Sunflower (new)

Sunflower (indeplady) | 12 comments Best laugh of the day, Loren. Didn't get to see any of those old movies...my air conditioning went out. Hot as you know what. At least they came and fixed it. Decided to watch the soccer match Japan vs. USA. So far a good match. And I am leaving for New Hampshire later this week, so I guess I won't have time to see any of those old martial arts movies until I get back.


message 33: by Goran (new)

Goran Powell (goranpowell) | 31 comments Mod
Just got my copy of Kage from America, only to have it swiped from under my nose by Charmaigne. I'll have to fight her for it...


message 34: by Goran (new)

Goran Powell (goranpowell) | 31 comments Mod
I think that must've been what happened, but it was all a just a blur...


message 35: by Goran (new)

Goran Powell (goranpowell) | 31 comments Mod
Just added my review of John Donohue's excellent new thriller KAGE, which I enjoyed reading during my summer holiday in France, which goes something like this:

Another unique martial arts adventure with the easy-going Irish American martial artist Connor Burke, and every bit as good as the other books in the series. The harsh desert environment is depicted in vivid detail and the tension of the US-Mexico border comes across thick and real. The insights into martial arts and dojo training are first-rate, coming from the author’s deep personal experience as they do. However it’s the characters that really make the books so engaging: tough ex-cops, hardnosed bitches, eager young students, the aging Japanese master Yamashita, and best of all Connor Burke himself, who despite his considerable ability never takes himself too seriously, and is all the more likeable for it. If you’re looking for a fast-paced martial arts thriller with a hero you can happily connect with, Kage is highly recommended.
Kage: The Shadow A Connor Burke Martial Arts Thriller


message 36: by John (new)

John | 9 comments Goran: always good to see a positive review, but especially gratifying when it comes from a fellow writer and martial arts enthusiast. Thanks so much!


message 37: by Goran (new)

Goran Powell (goranpowell) | 31 comments Mod
I got the book off her using a point-strike at Gallbladder 13, a point on the forearm that caused her to release the book instantly. She's reading it now...


message 38: by Charmaigne (new)

Charmaigne | 8 comments Am reading Kage at the moment and really enjoying it, will do a proper review once I finished it.
Also recovering from the lucky shot...x


message 39: by Goran (new)

Goran Powell (goranpowell) | 31 comments Mod
For rice crispie squares it should be something even more severe...


message 40: by Jim (new)

Jim Lee | 4 comments Mantis by Richard La Plante was a pretty good book. Great suspense and thriller. I really enjoyed it.

I also really liked Steve Perry's stuff. Although it's more sci-fi, it's still pretty heavily based in martial arts, especially his most recent book The Musashi Flex.


message 41: by Kevin (new)

Kevin Kraft (kevkraft) | 6 comments May I recommend my own action drama, DOBORO THE BOTTLENECKER, which will be available September 30th from Lulu.com?


message 42: by Kevin (last edited Oct 17, 2015 11:50PM) (new)

Kevin Kraft (kevkraft) | 6 comments My new action-adventure novel, DOBORO THE BOTTLENECKER, the first of a trilogy, is now available at Lulu (www.lulu.com) and Amazon! I'm looking for readers and reviewers. Here's the back cover blurb:



Dave Granger took the wrong job with a bad man.
That mistake cost him the life of his wife and daughter and nearly his own.

Rendered crippled and blinded from an assassination attempt, he was spirited away to distant South Korea for his own sake, where he underwent seven years of extraordinary physical and personal rehabilitation under both the harsh tutelage of a martial arts master and the God of his youth. Pushed beyond what he thought were his own limits, he discovered a new strength of human spirit with his new lease on life.

Now…seven years later, he is back in the states as a transitory street musician—a brand new man with a brand new name. And with his new lease on life, a new mission: to anonymously protect his daughter, whom he had assumed dead, from the malevolent forces that soon resurface with his appearance to finish the job they attempted seven years ago. His vigilance is undeniable. His skills are remarkable. But he’s only human. And his love for his little girl could very well be the thing that finally dooms them both, unless he can summon strength beyond himself, to finally confront the threat against them.

And that is only the beginning.





Doboro the Bottlenecker by Kevin M Kraft
Doboro the Bottlenecker


back to top