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SERIES—List & Discussions > Wars of Light & Shadow--Curse of the Mistwraith, Ch I, II, III - first impressions, No Spoilers

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message 1: by Janny (last edited Jul 15, 2010 06:25AM) (new)

Janny (jannywurts) | 1003 comments Welcome to the in depth discussion of The Curse of the Mistwraith.

For discussion of general impressions of the Prologue, Chapter sets I, II and III. NO SPOILERS, please.

Do pay particular attention to the Prologue - which, in a brief paragraph, shapes how the story will unfold.


message 2: by Kathi, Moderator & Book Lover (new)

Kathi | 3233 comments Mod
I'm finding myself turning frequently to the list of names & terms in the back as I try to organize in my mind who is who and what is what.

And the pronunciation of Lysaer's name caught my eye (Lie-say-er).


message 3: by Sandra (new)

Sandra  (sleo) | 1141 comments Kathi wrote: "I'm finding myself turning frequently to the list of names & terms in the back as I try to organize in my mind who is who and what is what.

And the pronunciation of Lysaer's name caught my eye (..."


I caught that too, Kathi!


message 4: by Kerry (new)

Kerry (rocalisa) | 487 comments Regards the pronunciation of Lysaer's name, that is the obvious way to say it to me. Is this an international thing? Genuinely curious, how else might you pronounce it? (I'm in New Zealand and grew up in a school systerm derived from the British one.)


message 5: by Marty (new)

Marty (martyjm) | 310 comments I am going to start tonight.


message 6: by Stefan, Group Founder + Moderator (Retired) (new)

Stefan (sraets) | 1667 comments Mod
I am so tempted to re-read along. So, so tempted. But I haven't read the entire series yet (I'm up to Grand Conspiracy) and I don't have the time anyway. It should be a fun discussion though, both for first time readers and re-readers. And re-re-readers...


message 7: by Sandra (last edited Jul 15, 2010 06:27PM) (new)

Sandra  (sleo) | 1141 comments Kerry wrote: "Regards the pronunciation of Lysaer's name, that is the obvious way to say it to me. Is this an international thing? Genuinely curious, how else might you pronounce it? (I'm in New Zealand and grew..."

In the appendix it says Lysaer means light bringer or something of the sort. Maybe it was a Freudian slip on Janny's part. :D And also according to the appendix, that's the way it's pronounced. I don't think it's an international thing, but I'm no expert on that, that's for sure.


message 8: by Sandra (new)

Sandra  (sleo) | 1141 comments Stefan wrote: "I am so tempted to re-read along. So, so tempted. But I haven't read the entire series yet (I'm up to Grand Conspiracy) and I don't have the time anyway. It should be a fun discussion though, bo..."

I intended to read along, but started re-reading and of course couldn't stop with a chapter set, so am now more than halfway through the book, LOL. I'm way compulsive....


message 9: by Chris (new)

Chris  (haughtc) I would bet it wasn't a "slip" by Janny, but rather a clue or a shade of irony. It doesn't seem like anything in these books was an accident.


message 10: by Kerry (new)

Kerry (rocalisa) | 487 comments I'm a new reader here, so rereaders and the author are welcome to chuckle privately as I comment.

Janny, I think I'm afraid of you (but in a nice way). You can be trusted not to do the obvious, but it also can't be assumed that you will do the opposite of the obvious. Which leaves me in a state of permanent anxiety about the characters. I think this may be part of why I haven't taken on the series before as the idea of feeling like that for 11 books terrifies me.

I do feel as if you've set me up to imprint on Arithon (which if so, has been hugely successful) so I'm rather worried about all those promised twists and turns, although the prologue does give me some hope this may turn out okay.

I will admit that I have tried to read Curse before, probably not too long after it came out in paperback (as I had discovered the Cycle of Fire when it was published and read the Empire books, so immediately jumped on the new series). As far as I can recall, I got about halfway through and stopped. I have absolutely no memory (or even guess) of why.

I know I liked it as I read, because I had also bought the second and third books, although I never progressed far enough to read them. A couple of years ago I looked at how long they had been sitting on the shelf unread and sent them to a second handbookshop. Which, of course, means that now I'm buying them all over again. I should have waited a little longer, obviously.

The reason I mention this is that at this point, after these three chapter sets I find myself feeling exactly as I suspect I felt that first time around. I want to rush out and buy all the rest of the series because I love the book, the world and especially the writing. I have made a promise to myself not to do anything rash and I may only buy The Ships of Merior when I am at least 3/4 of the way through this book.

It is going to be very interesting to progress through the book and see how I react all these years later. As I say, I have absolutely no idea what stopped me reading last time (except that it left me feeling nervous about ever trying again), so it is all something of a mystery.

I figure that this is my absolutely best chance to understand and get hooked on the series as I have all of this amazing group and the author herself encouraging me.

And if I don't, well that's okay too. For now, I'm in and enjoying and intending to keep right on reading.


message 11: by Jeff (last edited Jul 16, 2010 03:20AM) (new)

Jeff Watson | 55 comments I don't think the actual pronunciation of Lysaer (lie-sayer) is accidental as when I read the book the first time (without looking at the glossary) I read it is lye-sare, two syllables. :)


message 12: by Sandra (new)

Sandra  (sleo) | 1141 comments Kerry wrote: "I'm a new reader here, so rereaders and the author are welcome to chuckle privately as I comment.

Janny, I think I'm afraid of you (but in a nice way). You can be trusted not to do the obvious, ..."


I didn't chuckle reading your post at all. I found it moving. As one addicted person to another, I'm right there with you. I'm just starting my first re-read. Blitzed through the 8 books currently published because I HAD to.


message 13: by Dawn (new)

Dawn (breakofdawn) I actually just finished the book (couldn't slow down!), but I'll try my best to only talk about how I felt after the first three chapter sets.

I have to say, I think I was duped. Maybe not duped.. Some other word-ed. From reading the back of the book I was prepared to hate Arithon, with his dark evil shadow magic, and to love Lysaer, with his glorious power of light and goodness. Not so much! Initially Arithon was living up to my preemptive hatred of him, but that soon dissolved. Lysaer, to me, turned out to be a spoiled little royal brat, thinking that just because he was born on the right side of the sheets and Arithon on the wrong, that he was some how better than him. Arithon just wanted to be left alone to live his life, help his people.

Anyway, I could go on forever. But my basic point is that I, despite warnings that this isn't your typical good vs. evil fairy tale, was deceived. And I liked it :-)


message 14: by Dawn (new)

Dawn (breakofdawn) Kerry wrote: "The reason I mention this is that at this point, after these three chapter sets I find myself feeling exactly as I suspect I felt that first time around. I want to rush out and buy all the rest of the series..."

I felt the same way. I had to work hard control myself last night on Amazon. They have their 4-for-3 deal, and all of the books apply. I had them all in my cart, plus a couple other to even it out so that I got my free books as well. Looked at the total, realized my husband would shoot me if he knew I was spending all that on books when I just said no more random spending, and had to delete half of them.... I'll buy the others next month ;-)


message 15: by Dawn (new)

Dawn (breakofdawn) Speaking of pronunciations, one I struggle with is Asindar. Before I looked at the glossary I was reading it as "ass-in-der". Then when I saw it should be "ah-san-deer" I tried to change the way I said it... with no luck. I still say "ass-in-der" in my head. When I try to change it, it breaks up the flow for me. So I just go with it... Anyone else have a name like that (that you know you are saying wrong but do so anyway)?


message 16: by Sandra (new)

Sandra  (sleo) | 1141 comments Yes! I also struggle with Asandir.


message 17: by Janny (new)

Janny (jannywurts) | 1003 comments Sandra AKA Sleo wrote: "Kerry wrote: "Regards the pronunciation of Lysaer's name, that is the obvious way to say it to me. Is this an international thing? Genuinely curious, how else might you pronounce it? (I'm in New Ze..."

Har, Sandra, nothing in this book is a Freuding slip...the design is quite, quite deliberate....but there are double entendres and double meanings, galore. They will not all be apparent until the last page of the last volume.

But - if Kathy and Kerry and you are typical of this group - it is an amazing thing to have such intelligent readers looking so carefully this early on.


message 18: by Janny (new)

Janny (jannywurts) | 1003 comments Chris wrote: "I would bet it wasn't a "slip" by Janny, but rather a clue or a shade of irony. It doesn't seem like anything in these books was an accident."

Chris - you've just finished Warhost?
Yes! and you have no clue, yet...grin.

Here's the non spoiling note: the Paravian language was assembled VERY early on, even before many of the plot pieces were in place. Now, note this: I am not a linguist. Basis for the language, here, was not to mimic how language evolved culturally.

In fact, the assembly of the words in Paravian traces the movement of intent, degree, and applied force. In short, it is an energetically derived language, which forms the words in such a manner that far more can be interpreted from them - they are not just a symbol of an object or action, but a tracking of the energetic identity AND its motion/emotion and impact.

This is a layer that readers do NOT have to access to appreciate the story - but the underpinnings are there, and some scenes in later volumes will demonstrate the active phase of the language.

So an in-depth look at a name, or a phrase is only a question away. Ask, and quite a bit can be translated, from a simple name, if there is reader interest.


message 19: by Janny (new)

Janny (jannywurts) | 1003 comments Jeff wrote: "I am a re-reader(times 3 or 4 at least). I had been reading Raymond Feist's Magician series and that led to the Empire series that was cowritten by Janny. I liked those books so much that I decid..."

Jeff! You read my mind!!! grin.

Because the vote was SO DANGED NARROW between this series, and Roger Zelazny's work, I had promised to bow to inspiration where credit was due.

The triplet format was, in fact, inspired by Roger Zelazny's work, I believe it was Creatures of Light and Darkness - he set his scenes in extremely short chapters and put a one line triplet between scenes, often and usually a repeated line. The creativity of that was amazing, and so against convention it stuck in my mind as an effective treatment.

When it came time to put this series on paper - the breadth was so unwieldy, and the ordinary way of writing a whole scene to introduce a concept or a character just ate space and bogged the flow terribly.

So this seemed a perfect way to introduce a small filip, then phase it in with a subchapter (small take scene) and phase it back out, or move it a giant step forward, efficiently, without bogging the reader down with immersion scenes there was no (suspenseful) use for.

Zelazny also wrote a little book called Jack of Shadows, about a world that did not revolve, and an immortal character who kept dying and resurrecting with no memory of who he was...certainly that little tome ticked over ideas, too, though this work, and that one, are very little alike.

I wrote to Zelazny while he was alive, just a reader's appreciation and acknowledgment of his original ideas and inspiration to others - still have a post card he wrote back - amazing mind, that man.


message 20: by Janny (new)

Janny (jannywurts) | 1003 comments Kerry wrote: "I'm a new reader here, so rereaders and the author are welcome to chuckle privately as I comment.

Janny, I think I'm afraid of you (but in a nice way). You can be trusted not to do the obvious, ..."


Kerry - you are not the first reader who started, paused, and came back later. Sometimes this happens because the book was not the right timing...I have had many notes from readers 'rediscovering' this series after a discard, usually because they matured enough to be ready for it. Life had taught them to see more facets, and suddenly, the book came alive.

Let me say this: if you don't like what a character is doing in this phase, KEEP READING. Also, if a character is balked - one thing they will not do is whine and stick there - they may have to figure a new course, or have something impact them, but - they will always fight to progress - or to justify their lack of it.

This is not a story for fluff - however, it is not the brutal 'dies like flies' take - there will be no gratuitous surprises, or shocks...and for those days that you wonder - look up the title of the last volume (put up in the bibliography) and also: realize that I NEVER write the same ending twice. (If you read Master of Whitestorm, rest on that).

Don't expect to be handed the sweetness on a platter - and one thing more - YOU NEVER KNOW where the situation will flip. When it happens for the better, it will leave you breath-taken, because it is likely to be where you least suspect.


message 21: by Janny (new)

Janny (jannywurts) | 1003 comments Jeff wrote: "I don't think the actual pronunciation of Lysaer (lie-sayer) is accidental as when I read the book the first time (without looking at the glossary) I read it is lye-sare, two syllables. :)"

If there is huge interest in the actual pronunciations, there are MP3 audio excerpts done as teasers; my reading, I am no actor - but you'll get the actual spoken words - find the excerpts on www.paravia.com/JannyWurts, under the excerpt menu, under podcasts.


message 22: by Janny (new)

Janny (jannywurts) | 1003 comments Dawn wrote: "I actually just finished the book (couldn't slow down!), but I'll try my best to only talk about how I felt after the first three chapter sets.

I have to say, I think I was duped. Maybe not duped...."


Dawn - this book was written for such as you - amazingly, there are people who get enraged and toss the book because they INSIST the blond guy...well, grin. Rest assured, there will be a spoiler relief thread starting shortly, because there will come a point in the convergency (past halfway) when many readers won't be able to rein back...and a good thing, means I did my job. :)


message 23: by Janny (new)

Janny (jannywurts) | 1003 comments Janny wrote: "Dawn wrote: "I actually just finished the book (couldn't slow down!), but I'll try my best to only talk about how I felt after the first three chapter sets.

I have to say, I think I was duped. May..."


Dawn wrote: "Kerry wrote: "The reason I mention this is that at this point, after these three chapter sets I find myself feeling exactly as I suspect I felt that first time around. I want to rush out and buy al..."

The suggestion I'd make, here, for new readers:
The Curse of the Mistwraith is a good go to start. You will KNOW if you like this series by the time you finish it. (it will denoue straight up to the last page, so it is essential to finish to truly know).
Then get The Ships of Merior and Warhost of Vastmark together as they finish out Arc II. Some early readers even read the 3, thought they were a trilogy, and believed the series was over. (NOT).

By the end of the three, the series is well established - the next Arc (5 books, Alliance of Light) is actually also one story - and needs to be read as a block to absorb the full scope and impact. You may want to start with the first 3, but, once you've read Peril's Gate, that is the tipping point. The pace picks up very briskly and the final two volumes are all denouement - you'd want to have Traitor's Knot and Stormed Fortress in hand, both at once, because the story will not let up at that stage.

Hopefully this will let you parse your budget.


message 24: by Janny (new)

Janny (jannywurts) | 1003 comments Sandra AKA Sleo wrote: "Yes! I also struggle with Asandir."

Sandra and Dawn - say it any way that pleases you - truly - I would rather a reader interpret the language in a way that pleases themselves - nothing about this is 'rigid' - and I don't get offended in any way.


message 25: by Stefan, Group Founder + Moderator (Retired) (new)

Stefan (sraets) | 1667 comments Mod
I'm one of those readers who'll check the glossary in any book almost obsessively while reading, so I picked up a lot of the names' pronunciations there, but I have to admit that, in my mind, I still pronounce Lysaer as "lee-sayer". . Ah well.

By the way, a comment - and a warning - for the newcomers to series: the glossary evolves from book to book. Don't check the glossary for book 2 if you haven't finished book 1, because it will describe the events up to the end of book 1. At the same time, if you ever have to take a break between books, or you have a bad memory (like me), the glossaries will help you get back into the story.


message 26: by Random (new)

Random (rand0m1s) | 836 comments Dawn wrote: "I have to say, I think I was duped. Maybe not duped.. Some other word-ed. From reading the back of the book I was prepared to hate Arithon, with his dark evil shadow magic, and to love Lysaer, with his glorious power of light and goodness."

The prologue does say "Yet contrary evidence supports claim that the Master was unjustly aligned with evil".


message 27: by Dawn (new)

Dawn (breakofdawn) Random wrote: "Dawn wrote: "I have to say, I think I was duped. Maybe not duped.. Some other word-ed. From reading the back of the book I was prepared to hate Arithon, with his dark evil shadow magic, and to love..."

Right, I'm saying I was mislead by my first impression based only on reading the back cover of the book. Like I said, once I started reading it my opinion quickly changed.


message 28: by Kerry (new)

Kerry (rocalisa) | 487 comments By the way, a comment - and a warning - for the newcomers to series: the glossary evolves from book to book. Don't check the glossary for book 2 if you haven't finished book 1, because it will describe the events up to the end of book 1. At the same time, if you ever have to take a break between books, or you have a bad memory (like me), the glossaries will help you get back into the story.

As someone with a terrible memory I am delighted to hear this. I'm sure I'll need it as the series goes on.


message 29: by Charles (new)

Charles (charliewhip) | 141 comments Dawn wrote: "Random wrote: "Dawn wrote: "I have to say, I think I was duped. Maybe not duped.. Some other word-ed. From reading the back of the book I was prepared to hate Arithon, with his dark evil shadow mag..."

Dawn,that, too, is no accident. Janny's penchant for surprising changes in story and characters even extends to the cover blurbs. The cover art is hers, too, by the way.


message 30: by Janny (new)

Janny (jannywurts) | 1003 comments Stefan wrote: "I'm one of those readers who'll check the glossary in any book almost obsessively while reading, so I picked up a lot of the names' pronunciations there, but I have to admit that, in my mind, I sti..."

Stefan, thanks for making the point on the glossary. Readers be warned: the updates are done per volume, and will reflect events at the end of the book prior.


message 31: by Janny (new)

Janny (jannywurts) | 1003 comments Random wrote: "Dawn wrote: "I have to say, I think I was duped. Maybe not duped.. Some other word-ed. From reading the back of the book I was prepared to hate Arithon, with his dark evil shadow magic, and to love..."

Sharp note!
If history was written by the victor/or the prevalent pattern of thought, how deep would one have to dig to find the fragmented evidence of the opposition? And if it existed, would it be locked away under some vault, in a temple, as material too dangerously heretical?

In our own world, where do we look for the evidence and patterns and beliefs HELD BY AN ORAL CULTURE, long since trampled under by social conquest?


message 32: by Janny (new)

Janny (jannywurts) | 1003 comments Dawn wrote: "Random wrote: "Dawn wrote: "I have to say, I think I was duped. Maybe not duped.. Some other word-ed. From reading the back of the book I was prepared to hate Arithon, with his dark evil shadow mag..."

Dawn, no matter how carefully you read, your own presuppositons will fill in the blanks between lines, and more, if you are reading a scene from ONE CHARACTER'S VIEW - the actual event will be colored by what THAT character believes and thinks. This is not deliberate misdirection - but the info you are basing your point upon - how carefully did you weigh it, and how much did you take the character's own view into account to arrive at the fullest picture?

So the story will reverse curve as you see the same idea or event through the different lens of another set of presupposed beliefs - yours, and another character's who may be wise or limited - you have to weigh the evidence.

Or not - just ride along for fun and let the story whiplash the players as they encounter their visionary reach or their short sightedness.

Either way, you'll find surprises.


message 33: by Janny (new)

Janny (jannywurts) | 1003 comments Kerry wrote: "By the way, a comment - and a warning - for the newcomers to series: the glossary evolves from book to book. Don't check the glossary for book 2 if you haven't finished book 1, because it will desc..."

Kerry - I tried to make it easy as possible, and have provided resources in the books for that. You have an added advantage in this read - if you get lost, you can ask me and the other readers - happy to keep you on track, where it will not spoil an advance scene.


message 34: by Janny (new)

Janny (jannywurts) | 1003 comments Charles wrote: "Dawn wrote: "Random wrote: "Dawn wrote: "I have to say, I think I was duped. Maybe not duped.. Some other word-ed. From reading the back of the book I was prepared to hate Arithon, with his dark ev..."

The art is mine - and any questions, there, are certainly grounds for discussion.


message 35: by Edward (new)

Edward Butler | 19 comments Janny wrote: "Do pay particular attention to the Prologue - which, in a brief paragraph, shapes how the story will unfold."

Well, since I generally have a powerful aversion to any book with "Light" and "Dark" in the title or synopsis, I found it quite reassuring that the Prologue immediately suggested that this trope is going to be undermined, at least in some respects.

With regard to "lie-sayer", "fallen", etc., I confess to being a little uneasy. I'm not too fond of characters wearing their personality as a name-tag. The characters haven't been simplistic at all, though, so far (I'm 100 pages in). I think the temptation to have their names pronounced that way ought to have been resisted ("lie-sayer" wasn't the evident pronunciation for me; and of course, an initial silent "s" wouldn't be evident to very many…).

Absorbing read so far, though.


message 36: by Amelia (last edited Jul 17, 2010 05:57PM) (new)

Amelia (narknon) Janny wrote: Dawn, no matter how carefully you read, your own presuppositons will fill in the blanks between lines, and more, if you are reading a scene from ONE CHARACTER'S VIEW - the actual event will be colored by what THAT character believes and thinks.

This is so true. I've thought about how the perspective of any narrator can change the story a lot. I've decided no one can write anything without some sort of bias based on one's own experiences,ideas and beliefs. It's really interesting to hear how my sister remembers her childhood, because I remember it differently.



message 37: by Dawn (new)

Dawn (breakofdawn) Janny wrote: "Dawn, no matter how carefully you read, your own presuppositons will fill in the blanks between lines, and more, if you are reading a scene from ONE CHARACTER'S VIEW - the actual event will be colored by what THAT character believes and thinks...
"


Of course, which is why I prefer books with multiple points of view as opposed to only one. You get to see the whole picture, not just one biased point of view. Like in the early chapters of CotMW, you first get the view of Lysaer's people - pirates have been plaguing them, attacking their ships and killing their people for years. Damn those pirates! But of course there is always the other side of the coin; the pirates have their reasons for doing as they do.

What I like in particular is how the book forced me to at several points revise my opinions of the characters. No one is a cut and dry hero or villain. Like I said before, based on (quite literally) judging a book by its cover I assumed I would root for Lysaer and dislike Arithon. After reading the prologue I revised that opinion, but then after the first chapter set or so (where Arithon is held prisoner and all that befalls him during that period of time) I began to feel for both characters. Certainly Arithon was being mistreated, blamed for all of the bad that ever was done by any pirate (and for his mother's sins as well), but I also felt for Lysaer - he seemed to feel genuine regret at the way Arithon was treated. Maybe he wasn't so bad after all! That opinion again revised by the end of the third chapter set... And again and again after that (which I won't mention yet of course).

And that to me is how any great book should be - characters shouldn't be cookie cutter do no wrong (or no good) heroes/villains; they should be real people, making real decisions, good or bad. That's what makes a book good! Wondering what they will do, guessing, and then enjoying the ride as they do the exact opposite.

And PS... I have to say "hi" to Janny from one of your youngest fans - my seven month old son Lucas. Instead of reading him his books I instead have been reading out load to him from your books as I read. He loves it! He quiets right down, looks up at me with big wide eyes... it's really weird actually. My husband says he probably just likes the sound of my voice, but I think he just recognizes good writing when he hears it :-)


message 38: by Sandra (new)

Sandra  (sleo) | 1141 comments How sweet! And I couldn't agree more with you about the richness of the characters and their actions.

There are times when I really didn't like the things Arithon does as well -- as when he invades Lysaer's mind with that old memory of their mother.


message 39: by Dawn (new)

Dawn (breakofdawn) Sandra AKA Sleo wrote: "How sweet! And I couldn't agree more with you about the richness of the characters and their actions.

There are times when I really didn't like the things Arithon does as well -- as when he invad..."


That, and I dislike his attitude a lot of the time as well.


message 40: by Janny (new)

Janny (jannywurts) | 1003 comments Edward wrote: "Janny wrote: "Do pay particular attention to the Prologue - which, in a brief paragraph, shapes how the story will unfold."

Well, since I generally have a powerful aversion to any book with "Light..."


Edward - your are wise to be extremely wary of labels in this work; no matter where you are reading, or at what stage a characters' development or actions - what you see may have other angles, or an impacted event may change everything.

The angle of view will not stay static or follow the obvious path. It will be fun (and hair raising) to see what you encounter down the pike.


message 41: by Janny (new)

Janny (jannywurts) | 1003 comments Amelia wrote: "Janny wrote: Dawn, no matter how carefully you read, your own presuppositons will fill in the blanks between lines, and more, if you are reading a scene from ONE CHARACTER'S VIEW - the actual event..."

That's a great point, Amelia - same here. My sister recalls entirely different things with vivid clarity - we relive our current beliefs through our pasts, by how we attached value to what we thought occurred. Change the value - and a whole DIFFERENT landscape of memories emerges.

This story: change one character's value, and everything else shifts, including the hindsight view of an event in a prior chapter or volume.


message 42: by Janny (new)

Janny (jannywurts) | 1003 comments Dawn wrote: "Janny wrote: "Dawn, no matter how carefully you read, your own presuppositons will fill in the blanks between lines, and more, if you are reading a scene from ONE CHARACTER'S VIEW - the actual even..."

Amelia - this sort of story was made for your sort of reader, and no question. You will have fun seeing the post in the splinter worlds thread I am about to open.

What BUGS ME MOST about a lot of fantasy (and it's not a fault, because, there is a stage in life when a one faceted story is what a reader revels in) - it's that fantasy is too riddled with 'bad guy/good guy' fights - where the baddie assaults or mistreats a woman - and bam, that's their cue - here's the baddie - we NEVER quite know what the motive for this is, or what drives or torments that character - they are just "bad" and the convenient lable 'steps on the weak' is a convenience to orient our sympathies.

I have long since tired of oversimplified accounts, or Dark Lord and Uglies against the Forces of Right - that tale thrilled once, and got tired.

You have, however, astonished me. I have a dent in my jaw from my mouth falling open hard enough to hit the DESK, when I got an erudite note from a reader who was age 11!!!!! and who had just finished Stormed Fortress. That was my youngest reader EVER, till yours...look out world, when he grows up! Wow.

Or else, maybe, he notices what was there all along: if you read the lines aloud, there is a metre to them. A sounded rhythm to the words so that the ring in the ear will be pleasant. (I cannot WAIT to hear the audio version for (another) book, about to release soon - to see whether the narrator picks this up!) So yes, the words were selected for bardic beat as well. Your kid may have an ear for it, bless him!


message 43: by Janny (new)

Janny (jannywurts) | 1003 comments Dawn wrote: "Sandra AKA Sleo wrote: "How sweet! And I couldn't agree more with you about the richness of the characters and their actions.

There are times when I really didn't like the things Arithon does as ..."


Sandra and Dawn - yup. Did my job. You are set up precisely. The impact will hit the more vividly for it, through scene, sequel, and denouement.


message 44: by Dawn (new)

Dawn (breakofdawn) Janny wrote: "Dawn wrote: "Janny wrote: "Dawn, no matter how carefully you read, your own presuppositons will fill in the blanks between lines, and more, if you are reading a scene from ONE CHARACTER'S VIEW - th..."

That's what I love about reading it aloud, it flows so perfectly from the tongue. It's soothing to me to do so, and if it will keep the baby quiet at the same time then double awesome! God knows I get little enough time to read now as it is, between work and being a new mom. I can't wait to someday introduce him into the world of reading :-)


message 45: by Charles (new)

Charles (charliewhip) | 141 comments Dawn wrote: "Janny wrote: "Dawn wrote: "Janny wrote: "Dawn, no matter how carefully you read, your own presuppositons will fill in the blanks between lines, and more, if you are reading a scene from ONE CHARACT..."

Dawn, I just returned from a big Reiki conference where the "big deal" for this year was that some of our children wanted to be there. We were all completely blown away by how deeply and profoundly they manifested transformation and healing. This newest generation is da' bomb!


message 46: by Janny (new)

Janny (jannywurts) | 1003 comments Dawn wrote: "Janny wrote: "Dawn wrote: "Janny wrote: "Dawn, no matter how carefully you read, your own presuppositons will fill in the blanks between lines, and more, if you are reading a scene from ONE CHARACT..."

You noticed! That is AWESOME!

So very much care has been packed into these pages; I get all crazy happy when a bit like this is picked up.


message 47: by Janny (new)

Janny (jannywurts) | 1003 comments Charles wrote: "Dawn wrote: "Janny wrote: "Dawn wrote: "Janny wrote: "Dawn, no matter how carefully you read, your own presuppositons will fill in the blanks between lines, and more, if you are reading a scene fro..."

Charles - once we stepped off the stupid stance that 'children should be seen an not heard' a whole new world opened up - and continues to do so. I truly think, some days, if we asked kids how the universe worked, we'd see astonishing new directions in which to apply scientific research - did you know that Apple's icon system was originated by (so I heard) Kindergarteners? Jobs asked how they'd do it; why we put files in the 'trash' - grin.

What did you think of the twins' point of view in the story? (watch spoilers).


message 48: by Mawgojzeta (last edited Jul 19, 2010 07:16AM) (new)

Mawgojzeta | 178 comments I also realized, just a short way into the book, that I had read it before; I am guessing when it first came out. I know I finished it. I know I liked it. I am pretty sure I was planning to continue the series. But, then I forgot. I do think I am getting much more out of it now than I did then.

I also learned a new word today while reading the posts: denouement. Love to learn!

To Charles (message 46), back in the early 1980s, when I was a child, that seemed to be a big no-no. Probably primarily due to the cost! I figured by now the Reiki community as a whole would have embraced children's participation. Good to see parents are advocating for it.


message 49: by Charles (new)

Charles (charliewhip) | 141 comments Janny wrote: "Charles wrote: "Dawn wrote: "Janny wrote: "Dawn wrote: "Janny wrote: "Dawn, no matter how carefully you read, your own presuppositons will fill in the blanks between lines, and more, if you are rea..."

For me, the twins' point of view, as begun in Ships, is one of the grooviest elements of that part of the story, weaving in and out, and finally reaching a climax in Fortress (no detail -- SPOILERS). Their personalites begin to form quite earl, and we witness the beginnings of their loyalty-bonding to Arithon and his "missions" -- a great lesson there: pledging to heroes can lead to greatness, but there are often great sacrifices involved. It's like, don't sign up for this unless you're ready to go the distance. I love both twins' personalities. As in the real world, they essentially retain their basic personality styles while going through the immense changes a lifetime can bring.

Yes, I am totally blown away by the generation from 12 to 20 years old now. Marian says we are the StarChildren and they are the CrystalChildren, our kids. They are destined for great transformational acts, as Jesus said, "All these things that I do, you will do, and greater." This is one of the most encouraging and touching of the many, many miracles happening.

By the way, if you guys have been feeling disoriented physically (I've been dizzy, spaced-out, and sometimes mildly nauseous, for 3 days), not to worry. We just had a huge outpouring of intense energy from the Guardians; (please note the [rare} correct use of the semicolon -- grin) supposedly the absolute peak of the Big Shift was on Sunday.


message 50: by Charles (new)

Charles (charliewhip) | 141 comments Mawgojzeta wrote: "I also realized, just a short way into the book, that I had read it before; I am guessing when it first came out. I know I finished it. I know I liked it. I am pretty sure I was planning to cont..."

At one time, the Reiki movement was pretty much controlled by "the ten", a group of Reiki Masters who studied under the original Masters, and they charged $10,000 for the knowledge. I can say that those who paid this, that I know, have never complained that they got one penny short of the value. Now, Reiki has become very big, and is quite accessible -- Reiki 1 & 2, I paid $200 for the classes -- Advanced and Master classes are now similarly priced.


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