Hamlet Hamlet discussion


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why we value hamlet

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message 1: by Aaron (last edited Aug 25, 2016 11:03AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars


message 2: by Chrissy (last edited Aug 25, 2016 11:04AM) (new)

Chrissy I must agree with the bottom line!


message 3: by Amy (last edited Apr 30, 2008 08:23PM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Amy Wow, that essay got pretty incomprehensible (at least to me) pretty fast. Which was too bad, because I was interested in the ideas it purported to discuss.

I once read this thing for a cultural anthropology class about how an early anthroplogist told the story of Hamlet to this tribe he was living with. The people of this tribe reacted all 'wrong' to the story, siding with Hamlet's step-father for various cultural reasons. The point of the anecdote was to show how different social constructs are from one society to another. Though they may seem "natural" and "universal" from within one's own society - they really aren't. It was a really interesting study in human relationships... which I think says a lot about why Hamlet itself is interesting. How we react to it is what's intersting.


Rika I really want to read it but the link doesn't seem to be working :(


message 5: by Zulfiya (last edited Apr 17, 2011 10:39AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Zulfiya Amy wrote: "Wow, that essay got pretty incomprehensible (at least to me) pretty fast. Which was too bad, because I was interested in the ideas it purported to discuss.

I once read this thing for a cultural ..."

Books of fiction tend to express values and concepts of the society they were 'written in'. The same thing happened with some of the Harry Potter books. Snake is unanimously a symbol of evil and deceit for the Western Christian world, but in the Asian world snake is often a symbol of gracious beauty and intelligence.
I know, I know the books have different places in the world of belletristic hierarchy, but I think the example is quite self-explanatory.
On the other hand, Hamlet still is a play which appeals to millions, and even with the same issue "whose side to take?" the play 'Hamlet' deals with the eternal and universal problem of 'fathers and sons', even if some sympathizes the father side, it is still the same problem.
And Hamlet is not a tormented soul only: he torments others as well. He is truly horrible with his women: he treats his mother and, especially, Ophelia in an ungentlemanly manner. Everyone in the western world takes the side of Hamlet, and they tend to disregard this side of Hamlet's character.
I think the play has acquired a certain status and reputation in the world of drama and fiction, and this reputation reinterprets many messages and ideas in the play itself.
Having said what I wanted to say (wishful thinking:-)) I still think this play is a work of genius, and if you don't read 'Hamlet' at least once in your life, you will deprive yourself of many interesting, thought-provoking, and challenging discussions. 'Hamlet' is still number one for me.
But, as you know, 'All is not well;
I doubt some foul play' :-)))


Emily Iliani Zulfiya wrote: "Amy wrote: "Wow, that essay got pretty incomprehensible (at least to me) pretty fast. Which was too bad, because I was interested in the ideas it purported to discuss.

I once read this thing for a..."


Well said!
The beauty of literature is how one can relate to it (regardless of the side one takes) and appreciate it as a work of art. I truly love the words you used!


Zulfiya Thank you for your truly balmy words


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