Mystery/Thriller Reading Friends discussion

43 views
Monthly "Reads" > Barry's shortest month

Comments Showing 1-16 of 16 (16 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Barry (new)

Barry (barrypz) | 2997 comments Gator A Go Go: Tim Dorsey
Dorsey at his manic best, bringing back Serge and Coleman again, but also City and Country from the distant past along with a host of minor characters. If you want to learn things about Florida, this is the place. Serge is a moving Travelogue, although a travelogue that causes an amazing amount of destruction where ever he goes. If you want to know how the Florida Crazy genre got its name, read this book. (B+)

The Little Death: PJ Parrsih
It was not long ago that I almost wished harm of Louis Kincaid, the protagonist of this series, as he messed up both his personal and professional life in a way that was almost painful to see. The series has since matured, and Louis, though not perfect, seems to be moving ahead with his life. In Little Death, we go t oPalm Beach, where a friend of a friend has been accused of murder, and Louis must find an alternative. In the course of themystery, he meets both some of the best and some of the worst people he has come across. (B+)

City of the Sun: David Levien
A "new to me author", at the start of a rather hardboiled series starring Frank Behr, an somewhat independent and very large ex-cop. He reluctantly accepts a case to find a missing child, and pursues it into the ground, fighting according to a standard of justice that is his, and his alone. (B+)

The Kindness of Strangers: Julie Smith
Smith at her finest, more of the feud with Errol Jackomine, acting to save her friends and her sanity as a hurricane roars through New Orleans. (B+)

Crescent City Kill: Julie Smith
Detective Skip Langdon, in hot and murderous New Orleans, facing off against her nemesis, Errol Jackomine. (B+)

Innocence: David Hosp
A Boston lawyer book by a Boston lawyer, but I would imagine it features much more in the way of adventures and thrills than the typical lawyer sees. The book progresses in a fairly predictable fashion until near the end, where the twists and turns start. Hosp is not quite in Deaver's league though, and I saw most of them coming. (B+)

Trial by Fire: JA Jance
Chick Lit to be sure, but I'm a tolerant, new age kind of guy (stop laughing Carol) and can expand my horizons. This is the Ali Reynolds series, the least favorite so far of the Jance series for me, but perhaps getting better, or at least, a bit less male baiting. A recent trend in Jance's books are to embed a morality play or social cause in to her mysteries, and this was no exception. A woman is burned badly in an eco-terrorist incident at the start of the book, and the unraveling of what occurred becomes the story. (B)

Fuzzy Navel: JA Konrath
A grim start to this book, as all indications pointed to our hero not lasting to page 50. Might be innovative, a psycho approach to novel writing, but not llikely as this series has continued. Instead, this tale sets mystery aside for non stop action as the various regular characters fight for their lives. As the book ends, we are not sure they all made it. (B+)

The Betrayed: David Hosp
Stand alone, cops looking into a rich reporters death. By the title, you can infer there is a web of deceit in the background, but Hosp plays it fairly close to the breast. (B)

Guilt Trip: Ben Rehder
There has always been a dearth of good capers set in Texas (sorry Kinky). There has always been a dearth of good capers set in Rhode Island too,but Texas seems like a bigger omission. I am willing to submit that Rehder is writing capers with the best of them. He should move to Florida, he is the emotional heir to Lawrence Shames, who I miss greatly. (B+)

82 Desire: Julie Smith
This was the book I was driving toward. Even though I have read the Talba Wallis series, Talba was introduced in the Skip Langdon series, and this was the book. I think her role here was just to be introduced as a character, as she was not central to the story. Skip, f course, was. A scheme to defraud oil lease holders goes afoul, and one of the principles turns up missing or dead. Multiple bad guys, multiple schemes, and multiple good and not-so-good guys trying to figure it all out. (B+)

Hard Truth: Nevada Barr
Anna deals with a creepy religious sect and a creepier psycho killer. (B+)

Alter of Eden: James Rollins
Rollins drops his improbably Sigma Force for the "much more believable" Border Patrol Commando team. A shipwreck has revealed a secret bioweapon program that was breeding extinct species in the hopes of using them as weapons. Much like Preston/Child, there is an aura of science and an aura of the supernatural to Rollins work, and the reading is always fun.

Rusty Nail: JA Konrath
Some sick stuff in Konrath;s mind, the book is full of murder, torture, and fun. Fun does not seem like it should be part of this equation, but is an essential element in the Jack Daniels series. Another serial killer bites the dust. (B+)

Juror #11: Terry Devane
A Boston mystery author, but not Robert B. Parker (sigh), and I would say not even Jeremiah Healy, but actually it is Jeremiah Healy under his pen name. Technically, this is probably a legal thriller, and he has brought together a cast that includes an older, Harvard educated lawyer with an insane wife who used to be a boxer, his young female assistant, an escapee from the corporate fast track with a bad case of port wine stain who was abandoned at birth, and their investigator, a black, gay, former homicide detective. They are watched over by the single black mother who runs the office, and for all their problems, they work as a team. In this case they are defending a obster who happens, in this case, to be innocent. (B+)

The Indian Sign: Les Roberts
The Milan Jacovitch series, Cleveland's finest. So far, this is Les Robert's finest too, written along the lines of Gone Baby Gone, with all the moral ambiguity and hurt relationships. Jacovitch faces 2 cases, one in which a poor Native American child is kidnapped for an illegal adoption, and another where he suspects the executive that hired his is crooked, and he cannot bear to be anywhere but on the side of good. Jacovitch shows his character, but at great personal cost.


message 2: by Gail/Ladyvolz (new)

Gail/Ladyvolz Bowman (ladyvolz) | 343 comments Barry thanks for the great reviews, esp on Parrish and Rollins. I can't write reviews worth a darn and always look forward to the ones posted.


message 3: by Melodie (new)

Melodie (melodieco) | 3604 comments I'm behind on Beh Rehder's books. I met him at one of the B'cons. I think it was in Las Vegas, and he was such a nice personable guy. Glad you liked the Milan Jacovich book. Am hoping Les decides to write another sometime soon. Has been a couple of years since KING OF THE HOLLY HOP.


message 4: by Susie (new)

Susie Fevella (susieinks) | 1610 comments Thanks Barry! I do enjoy the "Jack Daniels" books, but they do make me squirm a little ;) I'm reading my first "Ali Reynolds" book by Jance right now - it's Cruel Intent and it's pretty good!


message 5: by Sandi (new)

Sandi (sandin954) | 1200 comments Great month Barry.

>>Juror #11: Terry Devane
A Boston mystery author, but not Robert B. Parker (sigh), and I would say not even Jeremiah Healy, but actually it is Jeremiah Healy under his pen name.
<<

I've read the first two books in this series (Uncommon Justice and Juror Number Eleven) and do enjoy all the characters. I still have a number of Cuddy's still to read too (have not read one since Shallow Graves back in 2001).

>>Gator A Go Go: Tim Dorsey
Dorsey at his manic best, bringing back Serge and Coleman again, but also City and Country from the distant past along with a host of minor characters.
<<

Another series I am behind on (I remember Coleman but not City and Country). I think I will try and listen to the audio version of Cadillac Beach this summer and try to get caught up.


message 6: by Barry (new)

Barry (barrypz) | 2997 comments Sandi:
City and Country had their moment in the sun way back in Hammerhead Ranch Motel. That was the first Dorsey I read, and my head was spinning around on my neck by the time I was done. The first half of the book I had no idea what was going on, the second half I was laughing my rear off.
Susie:
I did not think that Jance treated men very well in Cruel intent. They were almost all either evil or stupid or both. I prefer to think of us as devious.


message 7: by Ann (new)

Ann (annrumsey) | 14411 comments Nice Month Barry!
I really should get back to reading more Les Roberts again!
Barry wrote: "The Indian Sign: Les Roberts
The Milan Jacovitch series, Cleveland's finest. So far, this is Les Robert's finest too, written along the lines of Gone Baby Gone, with all the moral ambiguity and hurt relationships. Jacovitch faces 2 cases, one in which a poor Native American child is kidnapped for an illegal adoption, and another where he suspects the executive that hired his is crooked, and he cannot bear to be anywhere but on the side of good. Jacovitch shows his character, but at great personal cost. ."



message 8: by Donnajo (new)

Donnajo | 3545 comments I started Whiskey Sour the first Konrath book. I only read 4 pages so far but it seems good.


message 9: by Carol/Bonadie (new)

Carol/Bonadie (bonadie) | 7900 comments Barry wrote: "Trial by Fire: JA Jance
Chick Lit to be sure, but I'm a tolerant, new age kind of guy (stop laughing Carol) ..."


{{cleaning spewed diet black cherry soda from my computer screen}}}


Mary/Quite Contrary Phillips | 459 comments You sure cleaned up, for a short month. I was too embarrassed to post my February reads in a separate thread, so here goes:

MQC's February Read:
Under The Dome

that's it...nothing else, whew, I liked it but my god it took me forever.


message 11: by Barry (new)

Barry (barrypz) | 2997 comments That was a big book Mary.

I get through my late winter funk by reading. When Spring hits, I have my motorcycle riding club and my all consuming garden. The balance has already started to shift.
April may be real dismal as I go on night shift April 5 till late May, then take my daughter to Disney for a week.


Mary/Quite Contrary Phillips | 459 comments Barry...I'm in Atlanta, where the summer sends me running indoors for the blessed air conditioning. I enjoy spring and fall, spending time outside, because in summer I never leave the house. Since Robert went overseas I've had many more chores and errands to do, it's really cutting into my reading time! Disney sounds like fun...Ca or Fl?


message 13: by Barry (new)

Barry (barrypz) | 2997 comments Florida, so we can combine it with a visit to my mother.


message 14: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl | 547 comments Mary/Quite Contrary wrote: "I'm in Atlanta, where the summer sends me running indoors for the blessed air conditioning. "

Air conditioning - invented by Willis Carrier; born and raised in my home town. He is our most famous citizen.


message 15: by Melodie (new)

Melodie (melodieco) | 3604 comments Cheryl wrote: "Air conditioning - invented by Willis Carrier; born and raised in my home town. He is our most famous citizen.
..."


And I'm thinking he should be nominated for sainthood!


message 16: by Ann (new)

Ann (annrumsey) | 14411 comments I second that motion!!

Melodie wrote: "Cheryl wrote: "Air conditioning - invented by Willis Carrier; born and raised in my home town. He is our most famous citizen.
..."
And I'm thinking he should be nominated for sainthood!"



back to top