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message 1: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8092 comments Poetry (ancient Greek: ποιεω (poieo) = I create) is an art form in which human language is used for its aesthetic qualities in addition to, or instead of, its notional and semantic content. It consists largely of oral or literary works in which language is used in a manner that is felt by its user and audience to differ from ordinary prose.

I have noticed that several members of the group appreciate poetry and some are even poets themselves!
I would like to recognize the talents of our group poets and also have a place to share our appreciation for poets in general.

If you would like to introduce a certain poet that hasn't already been addressed in a thread, please open a new 'topic' under the Poetry folder so that we may follow your discussion, too.




Rick-Founder JM CM BOOK CLUB  | 57 comments Poetry, good poetry is akin to a verbal rendering of a fine oil painting,


message 3: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8092 comments Rick wrote: "Poetry, good poetry is akin to a verbal rendering of a fine oil painting,"

Again, well said, Rick.


message 4: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1840 comments I consider my visual poetry pieces as much poetry as art. But you can see some of my just plain poetry here.
http://www.goodreads.com/story/list/3...

She said, tooting her own horn.


message 5: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8092 comments Hmmm, I don't know if I am understanding this line of reason correctly, but in my opinion, "akin to a verbal rendering of a fine oil painting" means the feeling that the poetry evokes and not just the visual sense. When I 'see' a fine oil painting, the feelings add as much to my appreciation as the technique or style, etc. Same with poetry, just plain poetry can evoke those same feelings of love, or hate, or frustration, etc., whatever the poem is about in addition to appreciating its technique, style, etc. Does that make sense? I'm not the best with words.

BTW, I have always loved your poetry, Ruth. Go ahead and 'toot your own horn'! You deserve it!


Rick-Founder JM CM BOOK CLUB  | 57 comments Heather wrote: "Hmmm, I don't know if I am understanding this line of reason correctly, but in my opinion, "akin to a verbal rendering of a fine oil painting" means the feeling that the poetry evokes and not just ..."

you make interesting points. yet a really fine poen (Donne's Death Be No Proud) can evoke -in me- the same feelings of omnicient being and didactic pondering as Van Gogh's Poppies - a visual collage of emotions,set to the tune of one's mind music - and momentary emotions- ever-changing yet set in granite


message 7: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8092 comments Hello to all the talented members! I was just browsing through past posts. I am still amazed at how many people have started new topics on their individual works. I just want to take this opportunity to thank and commend you all!


message 8: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8092 comments November 15, 2011
Jeopardy

19TH CENTURY POETRY

HE WROTE, "HE LOOKED UPON THE GARISH DAY WITH SUCH A WISTFUL EYE; THE MAN HAD KILLED THE THING HE LOVED, & SO HE HAD TO DIE"


message 9: by Connie (last edited Nov 22, 2011 02:03PM) (new)

Connie G (connie_g) | 349 comments (view spoiler)
It sounded so familiar, probably read it in college, so I looked it up.


message 10: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8092 comments Good job, Connie!


message 11: by John (new)

John Karr (karr) | 76 comments Rick wrote: "you make interesting points. yet a really fine poen (Donne's Death Be No Proud) can evoke -in me- the same feelings of omnicient being and didactic pondering as Van Gogh's Poppies - a visual collage of emotions,set to the tune of one's mind music - and momentary emotions- ever-changing yet set in granite"

Well put. I've never been a big poetry fan but lately have been reading a bit more here and there. The most I'll do regularly is something from Poe.

Poetry is certainly packed with imagery and emotion, and I'm finding it opens creative windows.


message 12: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8092 comments Welcome to the group, Thomas!
If you would like to expound on your artistic, poetic talents, you are free to educate us here: Show us your written art

http://www.goodreads.com/topic/group_...

Just start a new topic to introduce yourself and your work. I am interested...


message 13: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1840 comments There's a great affinity between poetry and art. I know a lot of people (besides myself) who do both.

http://www.moontidepress.com/category...


message 14: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8092 comments Congratulations, Ruth! You are wonderful at both!


message 15: by John (new)

John Middleton | 4 comments is anyone familiar with ekphrastic poetry?


message 16: by Ruth (last edited Feb 10, 2012 10:04AM) (new)

Ruth | 1840 comments John wrote: "is anyone familiar with ekphrastic poetry?"

Yes, I like it a lot. And I've written quite a bit of it myself.


message 17: by Ruth (new)

Ruth | 1840 comments I’m growing fond of online publishing. First, because it allows all my friends to immediately read my poem, and second because online journals, freed as they are from the expense of four-color printing, can be handsomely illustrated. Case in point, Antiphon, an online journal originating in the UK, where you can read my poem, Let there always be.

Link to Antiphon: http://antiphon.org.uk/
Link to my poem: http://antiphon.org.uk/index.php/act-...


message 18: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8092 comments "Poetry comes nearer to vital truth than history" Plato


message 19: by Ed (new)

Ed Smiley | 871 comments Ruth wrote: "There's a great affinity between poetry and art. I know a lot of people (besides myself) who do both.

http://www.moontidepress.com/category..."


Turner wrote enormously literary titles for his paintings and often accompanied them with poems. Like "Slavers Throwing overboard the Dead and Dying—Typhoon coming on"

Placed next to the painting were lines from Turner’s own untitled poem, written in 1812:
“Aloft all hands, strike the top-masts and belay;
Yon angry setting sun and fierce-edged clouds
Declare the Typhon's coming.
Before it sweeps your decks, throw overboard
The dead and dying - ne'er heed their chains
Hope, Hope, fallacious Hope!
Where is thy market now?"

click to enlarge


message 20: by Cynthia (new)

Cynthia (tacet) | 2 comments I like Shelley's Ozymandias, some of Rilke's poems, She Walks in Beauty, Leda and The Swan, that sort of thing. Most of it is pretty mainstream as far as poetry goes.

A while back, I read some of Jared Carter's stuff, and I really liked it. He has this incredible grasp of the villanelle, and he uses it, not powerfully like One Art, but in a more mundane manner, as if he was creating this fantasy, painted kind of world... It's not what I usually read; I prefer books and poetry that are more realistic and less murky generally.

Here's the first stanza from Palimpsest, the first of his poems that I read.

The walk that led out through the apple trees—
the narrow, crumbling path of brick embossed
among the clumps of grass, the scattered leaves—


message 21: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8092 comments I like that first stanza. I drew me in immediately. Thank you, March.


message 22: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8092 comments Painting is poetry that is seen rather than felt, and poetry is painting that is felt rather than seen

-Leonardo da Vinci


message 23: by Heather, Moderator (new)

Heather | 8092 comments Poems are a hotline to our hearts, and we forget this emotional power at our peril.

Andrew Motion


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