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Writing Technique > Creating characters may feel like chore

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message 1: by Imowen (new)

Imowen Lodestone (lodestonethedawnofhope) | 123 comments Last few weeks I have been working on book three of my series,as my first book is being formatted. I got the first have of book 3 researched and outlined. What remained after was bringing secondary characters to the front line.

I made up a huge outline template for creating characters ( Not sharing that with anyone my apologies.)
But it felt like chore making a secondary character into an actual character. When I got to the background and goals in life. Let's say I was reaping what I sowed. I really had to take a step back, research and ask myself tough questions on how to make this character stand out, like I did for all my characters.
It felt like a chore, like I wrote a good of third book on the template I made but I was satisfied with the results.
When making a character do any of you feel like after its done you say...Damn I feel like I wrote 30 percent of the book already lol.


message 2: by Christina (new)

Christina McMullen (cmcmullen) | 1213 comments Mod
I did that with the first few nonstarts on one of my books years ago. I had a binder full of character profiles, pages and pages of printed name meanings from specific regions, dialog samples to test the uniqueness of their voice, etc...

But that burned me out pretty quick, so I took it down a notch. I still spend a bit of time on voices, but that's really it. I let their histories come to me during the writing phase now.


message 3: by Micah (new)

Micah Sisk (micahrsisk) | 563 comments I gave up doing the whole character pre-planning thing after my first completed (unpublished) novel. It just doesn't work for me. It's too contrived.

I find that all I really need is the correct voice to give them. Any details about their background that doesn't come up in the actual story aren't needed, IMHO.

See, secondary characters are almost never the POV characters. And when they are, it's not for long periods of time. So if you can write convincing dialog, putting each character in a different and appropriate voice, then that really covers 90% of the needed territory.

To me, dialog, not background is what sells a character.


message 4: by K.P. (new)

K.P. Merriweather (kp_merriweather) | 189 comments i go balls out in character creation even the minor ones. i have data files so thick you'd think i was investigating someone. lolz.
even if these minor guys only show up for a bit, i make them unique just like the random people you meet on the bus or at the mall or anywhere. you dont know them, just in passing for that one bit, but that other person has a whole history too with wants desires etc and the only two words they might say to you that day is good morning (or pick a phrase) and you never see them again.
dont sell your minors short :p they matter too!
but then again i could be the only one who takes joy in extensive knee deep background research XD


message 5: by Micah (last edited May 01, 2015 10:41AM) (new)

Micah Sisk (micahrsisk) | 563 comments K.P. wrote: "i make them unique just like the random people you meet on the bus or at the mall or anywhere. you dont know them, just in passing for that one bit, but that other person has a whole history too with wants desires etc and the only two words they might say to you that day is good morning (or pick a phrase) and you never see them again.
dont sell your minors short :p they matter too!"


Whereas to me, my minor characters just have to sound like real people. And, just like the strangers on a bus or in a mall, they all talk like they have backgrounds, but until they become somehow relevant to my story (still taking about both in a story and in RL), then meh, none of that really matters.

(That's not intended as a commentary on your writing style or preparation. I can see where some would find it interesting to pursue that. But personally that's just makes the writing process slower and harder for me. I'm unproductive enough already.)


message 6: by Imowen (new)

Imowen Lodestone (lodestonethedawnofhope) | 123 comments Christina wrote: "I did that with the first few nonstarts on one of my books years ago. I had a binder full of character profiles, pages and pages of printed name meanings from specific regions, dialog samples to te..."

Damn you sound like me...I still do that for one main reason. When the character has a heart to heart with another about their past. It makes damn good dialogue and other variables just fall into place. Especailly the challenge I am faced with, showing a teaspoon of humanism in Supernatural characters.


message 7: by Imowen (new)

Imowen Lodestone (lodestonethedawnofhope) | 123 comments Micah wrote: "I gave up doing the whole character pre-planning thing after my first completed (unpublished) novel. It just doesn't work for me. It's too contrived.

I find that all I really need is the correct v..."


I can see that working with secondary characters. But I brought 2 supporting characters to the front of the line. But the tax is on me for keeping all characers pro supernaturals with a hard life. In addition all my important characters are rock stars. Meaning all of them can carry a story on their own. The reason why I am so damn hard on myself, it will give me opportunities to keep on writing. It's a chore of love hate. Love to see it unfold at times hate putting a freaking 1,000 piece puzzle together.


message 8: by Imowen (new)

Imowen Lodestone (lodestonethedawnofhope) | 123 comments K.P. wrote: "i go balls out in character creation even the minor ones. i have data files so thick you'd think i was investigating someone. lolz.
even if these minor guys only show up for a bit, i make them uni..."


Now that's good advice, give minor characters a bigger spot light sometimes. I see where you're going, I am thinking it opens up the story and gives you many ways to do a plot twist. Also bring up the bad guy, in particular the guy who gave the character advice on life many of times, is the real vilian in the book. To be clear leading the character down a dark path without him or her realizing it-Now that's brilliant of you.


message 9: by Micah (new)

Micah Sisk (micahrsisk) | 563 comments Imowen wrote: "The reason why I am so damn hard on myself, it will give me opportunities to keep on writing..."

I never seem to quit finding reasons to keep on writing. I've got too many reasons actually. And not enough time to write them all.


message 10: by K. (new)

Caffee K. (kcaffee) | 461 comments For me, when I'm working with secondary characters, I've got at least a basic character sheet. Granted, since I'm dealing with fantasy elements in their abilities, I do it to keep me sane, and to remember who can do what, but it also helps me to keep in mind where they are coming from and going to. This helps with overall character development. If the secondary characters are growing, either the MC is growing right along with, or they'll be overshadowed.

Kind of a self-check to make sure I'm keeping the development running all the way through, rather than letting it stall out into a paper cut out character.


message 11: by Melissa (new)

Melissa Jensen (kdragon) | 36 comments Micah wrote: "I gave up doing the whole character pre-planning thing after my first completed (unpublished) novel. It just doesn't work for me. It's too contrived.

I find that all I really need is the correct v..."


I'm the same. I mean, I will have a list of the character names and a short blurb of sorts describing their back story and bits of their personality, but for me as long as I have their basic personality and voice down then the rest just... happens. In fact, it's usually my characters that inspire my stories. When first plotting a story the character usually comes first, mostly fleshed out save for a few minor details that will be worked out later, and then the rest of the story follows.

But I do know that some authors need those pages and pages of backstory for either the main character or all the characters. I'm occasionally that way with world-building. I'll write out pages and pages of notes on a world, some of which I may never use. But sometimes, I hardly world-build at all, creating the world as I write.

Whatever works.


message 12: by Owen (new)

Owen O'Neill (owen_r_oneill) | 625 comments Every writing experience is different. We don't plan and we don't red-shirt either. The characters develop as we write them, and we hope they are all interesting in their own way. Letting them "develop" naturally as we write gives us better rounded characters, as opposed to planning in advance. We just aren't good at that -- we'd come up with stale, canned sounding characters. So we let them interact with other characters, and we what happens.

But yes -- whatever works.


message 13: by Anfenwick (last edited May 02, 2015 12:46AM) (new)

Anfenwick (anne-fenwick) | 36 comments I create my characters out of blends of people I know or meet resulting in 'resemblances to persons living or dead that are purely coincidental' ; )

For secondary characters, I don't always feel I need my POV character to know more than I would about casual acquaintances or people I run into briefly. If I did, I'd be well on the way to creating a new main character.

PS: I forgot to say that I do plan my main character arcs on paper, in quite a lot of detail.


message 14: by A.H. (last edited May 02, 2015 12:48PM) (new)

A.H. Richards (aldous) There's an interesting variety of approaches here. I'm one of those who writes like a method actor. I dive deeply into time and place and inside the character - well, actually, it's more like the character controlling me and having his/her say, until we come to an understanding. Then I trust myself with the character, and can then start running with it. However, I can't recall ever really making templates for primary or secondary characters. I write, and write, and write, giving free rein as much as possible; then put the work away for a while for it to percolate. My mind continues with the plotting stage, playing with ideas, twists, details, which I add to my notes files. Then, come edit/rewrite time, I am ready to evaluate the characters... but most of all, to evaluate the architecture and voice of the story itself. What works, I keep; what doesn't work, I pull out. It's a long process, but, I find, an 'organic' one. The essential stuff stays - whether it's character, plot, action, description - and the non-essential goes. I once deleted over sixty pages devoted to the main character (and some secondary characters) because it became obvious it wasn't driving the story. That's pretty much my main criteria for deciding on whether a character develops and/or stays - if it works, is believable, and drives the story, it's good. If not, it withers on the vine, kind of naturally.


message 15: by Amanda (new)

Amanda Lyles (gobbledygook) | 380 comments I have entire pages devoted to trying to keep the different aspects of my characters separate. I usually only add to them after something happens in the story though. I start off with what the character looks like and add history from there.


message 16: by Imowen (new)

Imowen Lodestone (lodestonethedawnofhope) | 123 comments Micah wrote: "Imowen wrote: "The reason why I am so damn hard on myself, it will give me opportunities to keep on writing..."

I never seem to quit finding reasons to keep on writing. I've got too many reasons a..."


Damn!I say the same thing when I am writing myself.


message 17: by Imowen (new)

Imowen Lodestone (lodestonethedawnofhope) | 123 comments Amanda wrote: "I have entire pages devoted to trying to keep the different aspects of my characters separate. I usually only add to them after something happens in the story though. I start off with what the char..."

With me its pages never a page.


message 18: by Imowen (new)

Imowen Lodestone (lodestonethedawnofhope) | 123 comments A.H. wrote: "There's an interesting variety of approaches here. I'm one of those who writes like a method actor. I dive deeply into time and place and inside the character - well, actually, it's more like the c..."

Process of elimination, am I right or wrong? When I started writing your method never worked for me. So I started making character templates along with outlining the story. Long story short I did in fact acquire a lot of pages and data. Some of the work was stored for later and only a few of it stayed. But having nailed the character background, behavior and quirks things were smooth sailing. However when plot twist came up,( I call challenges) in particular the character experiencing something new. I had to go back to the drawing boards and write notes. Then go back writing.
It's like you're discovering the character like the reader is, its kind of cool like that.


message 19: by Imowen (new)

Imowen Lodestone (lodestonethedawnofhope) | 123 comments Anne wrote: "I create my characters out of blends of people I know or meet resulting in 'resemblances to persons living or dead that are purely coincidental' ; )

For secondary characters, I don't always feel I..."


I keep a composition book handy myself.


message 20: by Imowen (new)

Imowen Lodestone (lodestonethedawnofhope) | 123 comments Owen wrote: "Every writing experience is different. We don't plan and we don't red-shirt either. The characters develop as we write them, and we hope they are all interesting in their own way. Letting them "dev..."

True enough it depends on what you're writing and what type of character a person is working with. Good example if you're working with a character that's 20 but has a lot of experience with life. He or she will stand out. Meaning knowledge, action and all that good stuff.

Like you said whatever works stick with it and don't ever look back.


message 21: by Imowen (new)

Imowen Lodestone (lodestonethedawnofhope) | 123 comments Melissa wrote: "Micah wrote: "I gave up doing the whole character pre-planning thing after my first completed (unpublished) novel. It just doesn't work for me. It's too contrived.

I find that all I really need is..."


On your last 2 paragraphs you're in the game. When it comes to characters talking about their past of faction. Writing the dialogue will flow like water.


message 22: by Imowen (new)

Imowen Lodestone (lodestonethedawnofhope) | 123 comments K. wrote: "For me, when I'm working with secondary characters, I've got at least a basic character sheet. Granted, since I'm dealing with fantasy elements in their abilities, I do it to keep me sane, and to ..."

I hear ya. Working with Supernatural Characters is not easy. Anyone says it is they're lying. I have one Psychic his character template is about 8 to ten pages long. Young dude but his past is rich and action packed. His Power(s) sheet, that's on a separate file. Let's say I am not done working out. I got his tainted power nailed. But his tainted/ birthright power has strong influences on his Psychic disciplines.
That's the next set pages I have waiting on me. Good news is I don't have to write it right now. I just wanted the hard stuff completed first.


message 23: by A.H. (new)

A.H. Richards (aldous) Imowen wrote: "A.H. wrote: "There's an interesting variety of approaches here. I'm one of those who writes like a method actor. I dive deeply into time and place and inside the character - well, actually, it's mo..."
Yes, I agree. Discovering the character is a wonderful thing. It's like actually getting to know a new, real, person in your life... the quirks and characteristics show themselves by degrees, and especially when they have to deal with something new. I try to give my characters - like my friends - a lot of respect. :-)


message 24: by K. (new)

Caffee K. (kcaffee) | 461 comments Imowen wrote: "I hear ya. Working with Supernatural Characters is not easy. Anyone says it is they're lying. I have one Psychic his character template is about 8 to ten pages long. Young dude but his past is rich and action packed. His Power(s) sheet, that's on a separate file. Let's say I am not done working out. I got his tainted power nailed. But his tainted/ birthright power has strong influences on his Psychic disciplines."

Well, I admit to cheating on this one - once I've got the basic parts - name, race, looks, and the simple "numbers" rolled, since I'm still working with a foundation system, I wind up printing off a huge chunk of paper to accommodate the magical abilities. However, most of that winds up being extraneous for the character. I've tried copying off just the bits I need off the web page into my own document, and it always winds up being gibberish. So, I print off 4 pages when I only need 2 paragraphs of it, and highlight what is important. Makes for a thick file/stack of paper but at least I've to the basics. (And, then I wind up twisting that into a pretzel, so not sure how much good having the print offs really does me.)


message 25: by Imowen (new)

Imowen Lodestone (lodestonethedawnofhope) | 123 comments Well its a start, you'll figure it out what you're doing wrong and right. It takes time and dedication, you'll get there.


message 26: by Imowen (new)

Imowen Lodestone (lodestonethedawnofhope) | 123 comments A.H. wrote: "Imowen wrote: "A.H. wrote: "There's an interesting variety of approaches here. I'm one of those who writes like a method actor. I dive deeply into time and place and inside the character - well, ac..."

Yes it is also a new character expands all paths in a story too. More unique, interesting or diabolic the character is the possibilities become endless


message 27: by Donald (new)

Donald McEwing | 8 comments I've been thinking about this all morning. Why does one reader/critique/reviewer/ like the characterization, while another will either not care or think the characterization is bad? The book has not changed. The words on the page are the same. And yet two people can have completely different reactions.

Some people read romance, others space opera, and the reason is obvious. We often choose to read books that reflect ourselves. We like to psychologically project ourselves into the characters, especially the protagonists. But it goes farther than that. From the point of view of the reader, the quality of the writing & characterization then becomes 'good' or 'bad' depending on that particular reader.

It is not intentional. We all do it to some degree. People think they are being objective, and sometimes they are really trying, and yet, all decisions are emotional decisions. Everything that follows is a rationalization to justify the decision.

I've noticed this in feedback for what I just wrote. Women tend to like the female heroine. Men prefer the male character. It really struck home when an autistic reader gave me feedback. He thought the female villainess was great. She was all action and no emotion. He thought all the other characters were flat and boring and therefore examples of bad writing.

So I guess the conclusion to draw from all this is to simply write for the audience you want to address. Create characters for the audience. Beyond a pretty basic level of description and background on the part of the writer, the reader will do the rest, bringing their own context and preferences.


message 28: by Micah (last edited May 15, 2015 04:14PM) (new)

Micah Sisk (micahrsisk) | 563 comments Donald wrote: "Women tend to like the female heroine. Men prefer the male character..."

That's an easy generalization to make but I don't think it reflects the full reality or complexity of the situation. It assumes that readers only look for a reflection of their ego in characters, someone they can project their empathy upon. And that's just not the case with all readers.

I've seen the question come up time and again in GR threads. From the responses I've seen, there are several types of readers and characterization will work differently for them.

And then we have cases like, for example, stories where the main character is an anti-hero, a villain, a mass murdering psychopath or something. A lot of people get a wicked and perverse sense of entertainment out of reading those, and it's not because they identify with the MC, it can actually be because the MC is so very opposite of them.

But even in normal hero stories, there are people (like me) who don't try to find an identity character. What makes character work for us is the author's ability to communicate the character's unique personality. I tend to like intelligent characters, but also sad sacks who can't get a break, who just get tossed around by the world and have to deal with it (reference most of Kurt Vonnegut's protagonists). Male, female, other...it doesn't matter to me. They can be old or young, handsome or ugly. Doesn't matter really matter WHAT they are, but rather WHO they are as people. (My wife's favorite character in my first try at a novel was a box-like robot with dozens of spidery legs and no Disneyesque anthropomorphism...she just liked its character.)

Then there are those who specifically look for an identity character. I suspect the Twilight series did so well because it appealed to this crowd.

Donald wrote: "So I guess the conclusion to draw from all this is to simply write for the audience you want to address. Create characters for the audience. "

Hmm. Well, if you have an audience big enough to figure out what they want, then that's one approach. Personally, I write what I want to read. I figure if you write it, they will come (eventually). I can't anticipate what my readers are going to want. I don't even think it's healthy to try and second guess their wants, nor to change what I'd write to fit an audience even if I'm 100% sure I know what they want. Unless your only goal is to make as much money as possible, I don't think it's worth it. And if that's your goal, then you'd probably do better becoming an Investment Banker or something. Writing's a hard slog to make a living at, let alone a ton-o-cash.

The conclusion that I draw is that you need to listen to reader feedback, keeping an open mind and a huge grain of salt handy. Learn to be self-critical and when reader response rings true to you, then look at changing what you're doing. But otherwise, write the best book and characters you can and hope that the readers who will enjoy your work will find you. The rest can find satisfaction elsewhere.


message 29: by G.G. (last edited May 15, 2015 04:27PM) (new)

G.G. (ggatcheson) | 200 comments Donald wrote: "Women tend to like the female heroine. Men prefer the male character..."

I disagree and i am a woman. I'm more attracted by male protagonists. I have bought books because they had male lead, while I skipped books that sounded interesting once I found out it was a female. I'm not saying I won't read a book featuring a female, but I'm not as readily tempted to read one if it's the case. Maybe I'm old school. Maybe I'm the exception. I just know what I like and it' not a female protagonist.;)


message 30: by K.P. (new)

K.P. Merriweather (kp_merriweather) | 189 comments I tend to hate female mc's because authors tend to write them as emotional whiny airheaded weak as fuu too stupid to live gits. So not all women prefer female mc's. Now if there were stronger less sterotypical female mc's who dont fall in lurve at the drop of a pin or needs saving by captn saveaho in books then hell yeah i would be in it so fast...


message 31: by Donald (new)

Donald McEwing | 8 comments I'm pointing out what I am seeing among people reading my material- the women tend to like the female heroine, the men the male hero. True, it is an easy generalization. It is not a hard and fast rule. Most of the time, I don't think readers even do it consciously.

Micah writes: "... I write what I want to read."

Likewise. That was exactly what got me started. I read a lot of science fiction, but while it was entertaining and full of great ideas, the literary element was lacking. It was a feeling along the lines of Vonnegut about SF. Basic things like imagery were lacking. The audience for that is probably small, but it exists...

GG
For some reason I do better characterizations with women. At least I think so. I have no idea why that is so. Readers often make different conclusions. Go figure. My main male characters tend to be metaphysical and gloomy, my females strong and positive. There is probably a harsh life lesson there, but I would rather not think about that too much!


message 32: by G.G. (new)

G.G. (ggatcheson) | 200 comments Nothing wrong with metaphysical and gloomy male characters as long as it fits the story.

Strong and positive females you say? KP should love your female characters then. As for me, they're still females, strong or weak. :P I need something more to pull me in if they are lead.

I noticed from the little I read from your sample that's it's told from a male first person POV and it's sci-fi.... well THAT sounds interesting. :P


message 33: by Donald (new)

Donald McEwing | 8 comments GG,
The POV shifts from the male hero, to the female heroine, to the female villainess, and back to the male hero. It's science fiction only in terms of setting. I think speculative fiction would be a better term, but a lot of times that isn't even listed as a choice for genre.
The female heroine- Victoria, The Official Hostess- is a strong character. She's smart, kind, and well read in a world where few people are literate, and to enhance her own status she encourages people to believe she is a witch. She is also very vain and she loves shoes. :-)
At some point I create a detailed character sheet for the main characters, but a lot of that backstory ends up being edited out...


message 34: by G.G. (new)

G.G. (ggatcheson) | 200 comments Your story happens on an alien world. I'm guessing, alien culture too? Sounds sci-fi to me.

Speaking of detailed character sheets, one thing I love to do is use them to make short stories. They make good bonus material. Sadly, I didn't put any at the end of my first book because Smashwords advises to put a few bonus chapters. However, I put some in my sequel.

While they don't relate directly to the story, they're fun for fans to read and they can help them understand the characters better. Hey, I hate wasting good material. What can I say? ;)


message 35: by Donald (new)

Donald McEwing | 8 comments Culture is loosely based on French Haitian culture of 1800.

I see you are using FB & Amazon. Are you using other sites? My Webmaster and I set up my own, www.nouveauhaitiah.com and then used a tab for 'deleted scenes' to post some additional material. Posting character work there is an interesting idea.


message 36: by G.G. (new)

G.G. (ggatcheson) | 200 comments No, no other site. I use the author page here on GR. I can't see myself using a website but the deleted scenes tab is an great idea. Kind of like the deleted scenes in movies.

Nice website by the way. :)


message 37: by Donald (new)

Donald McEwing | 8 comments Thanks! I will pass that compliment on to Jennifer, the Webmaster. She is a young computer design engineer and daughter of neighbors. Btw, an illustrated version of this book will be out soon. The drawings are already posted in the site's gallery, and once posted on the site, will also be put on FB.

How do you feel about the GR author page? I'm new to GR, as you can probably tell.


message 38: by Owen (new)

Owen O'Neill (owen_r_oneill) | 625 comments My experience as a reader and author is that people latch on to all sorts characters, independent of any obvious similarity in identity, and sometimes for reasons that I find (as an author) obscure. Since we are considering spin-offs, we recently asked readers which characters they like to know more about. The results surprised us: several people picked out a minor character that gets all three pages. A couple of people picked out a character who's on the "other side" (the main adversary in our latest book).

We have quite a number of female characters, and overall, I think they tend to resonate with our readers a little more strongly than our male characters. Our MC is a woman, and our readers like her (understandably, I guess). But our main male character gets a rather different response: some readers like him, some don't quite understand him, a few don't trust him. (One reader was even concerned that the MC was going to make a "big mistake" with him.) Our other male characters don't get such a varied response, but this one character seems to be kind of controversial.

We even had a debate very recently over a rock. It's kind of hard to explain since the rock isn't exactly a character (or so we thought) but it does have some interesting abilities. Anyway, a VIP thinks the rock is really cute and didn't want us doing anything "bad" to it. A rock? But given this is a VIP, we actually tweaked a things to allay these concerns.

So you never know what readers are going to think. They might get attached to a semi-non-character rock. They might express concern over who is sleeping together (or thinking about it). Of course, how you respond to any of this is up to you.

I completely agree with Micah that one can't anticipate what readers want and trying second guess what they want seems like a waste of time and energy. All I think authors can do is write the characters as engagingly as they can and let the chips fall where they may. (If nothing else, it might get you some interesting emails.)


message 39: by G.G. (new)

G.G. (ggatcheson) | 200 comments Donald wrote: "How do you feel about the GR author page? I'm new to GR, as you can probably tell..."

I like it. It took me awhile to take advantage of it but I like that you can link your posts to FB and Twitter.

(Sorry mods for being a bit off subject.)


message 40: by Donald (new)

Donald McEwing | 8 comments True, we're wandering off topic, but I noticed this thread had gone @ two weeks w/o a comment.
I have hesitated to link FB & GR. Maybe I should. Any downside?


message 41: by G.G. (new)

G.G. (ggatcheson) | 200 comments I don't auto link. I post and then click the share button. It doesn't take long and I still have control over what goes and what doesn't.


message 42: by [deleted user] (new)

Creating characters is never be a chore for me, because if I want a character in the story, I know what I'm going for and constructs them piece by piece. Even the secondary characters usually have something driving them, but occasionally I do need a hate-sink.


message 43: by Imowen (new)

Imowen Lodestone (lodestonethedawnofhope) | 123 comments Donald wrote: "I've been thinking about this all morning. Why does one reader/critique/reviewer/ like the characterization, while another will either not care or think the characterization is bad? The book has ..."

How can you write for an audience that you don't know? I am not sold women will be all over a female heroine. That's just too slot a and slot b. My point, no writer knows who is going to like their work. If you write a female main character that has the character of a strong woman and loves her strong masculine alpha male. You might have mixture of female and male fans. Or have a large male following saying 'real' woman right here!
I am stickler for multidemsional characters, its the even flow for a strong story line. The more life betwixt fantasy you put in your character, opens up plot twist and character can reveal a side of themselves the reader did not expect. Now this is one big chore to do. But this is one of the challenges I put on myself to make a story I can live with. I am heartless god when i look over my characters lol.
When I was writing my first book I didn't give a damn about book reviewers. I was all about meeting or exceeding my expectations. To put in simple terms, if one wows themselves, think about the impact it will have on readers?


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