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Regency Buck (Alastair-Audley, #3)
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Group Reads > Regency Buck Chapters 13-23

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Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂  | 4330 comments Mod
Thoughts?


Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂  | 4330 comments Mod
Just about to start Chapter 13 - I just can't read Heyer slowly!


Karlyne Landrum | 3895 comments I had just decided that Peregrine seems much younger than Judith, but the scene at Worth where she argues with the Earl and ends up feeling rather foolish and insecure makes her seem younger, too. I liked her frankness and willingness to admit being at fault, too.


Leslie Karlyne wrote: "I had just decided that Peregrine seems much younger than Judith, but the scene at Worth where she argues with the Earl and ends up feeling rather foolish and insecure makes her seem younger, too. ..."

Perry is more immature for his age, I think.


Louise Sparrow (louisex) | 458 comments I've read the book many times, but listening to it this time Peregrine seems much younger to me, too young to be marrying in fact.


Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂  | 4330 comments Mod
Louise Sparrow wrote: "I've read the book many times, but listening to it this time Peregrine seems much younger to me, too young to be marrying in fact."

A good point - I've answered in the spoilers thread as it brings up some other matters. :)


Karlyne Landrum | 3895 comments I just finished Chapter 19, and I'm very, very impressed by Heyer's skill.


Hana | 652 comments I'm loving how the characters slowing change their opinions of each other as in this passage in Chapter 13: Worth asks "'Why do you look so grave?' She raised her eyes to his face, and found that he was watching her with a softened expression, which she might almost have believed to be sympathy, had she not been persuaded that he knew nothing of so gentle an emotion."

Chapter 12 at Belvoir Castle seems to have been something of a turning point for Worth and Judith.


message 9: by Hana (last edited May 08, 2015 06:08AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Hana | 652 comments "I hope I am as respectable as Miss Tylney Long, and I believe it to be a fact that the Duke has proposed to her several times."

What, the Pocket Venus?" exclaimed Peregrine...."I thought Wellesley Poole was casting his eyes in her direction."

This is all based on a actual--and rather sad story. Perry and Judith have this conversation in the Winter of 1811-12 and the Pocket Venus would marry Wellesley Poole in March. No HEA for her: https://hauntedpalaceblog.wordpress.c...


Andrea AKA Catsos Person (catsosperson) | 1136 comments I mistakenly thought a pocket Venus was not one person in particular, but instead a mistress! Ha


message 11: by Hana (new) - rated it 4 stars

Hana | 652 comments I thought something along those lines on my first read, Andrea. This time I'm trying to check out some of the historical details. They are totally amazing!


Carol She's So Novel꧁꧂  | 4330 comments Mod
Hana wrote: ""I hope I am as respectable as Miss Tylney Long, and I believe it to be a fact that the Duke has proposed to her several times."

What, the Pocket Venus?" exclaimed Peregrine...."I thought Wellesle..."


I knew she was a real person, but that is so sad!


message 13: by HJ (new) - rated it 3 stars

HJ | 948 comments Poor Miss Tylney Long! My understanding of the term "Pocket Venus" is of a woman beautiful enough to be compared to Venus who is also very petite i.e. could fit into your pocket. The male equivalent would be a pocket Adonis. Small, but perfectly formed.


message 14: by MaryC (new)

MaryC Clawsey | 480 comments Andrea (Catsos Person) wrote: "I mistakenly thought a pocket Venus was not one person in particular, but instead a mistress! Ha"

I remember reading a review of a book called The Pocket Venus, which was certainly about one specific woman (but not, I think Catherine Tylney-Long). Later I learned that the term was applied to any petite beauty, maybe especially a curvy one.


Carolien (carolien_s) | 88 comments Thanks for the link, Hana. Poor woman, what a horrible marriage.


Jenny H (jenny_norwich) | 690 comments A reminder of what could happen when a married woman owned nothing of her own, not even her underwear!
This was the case in England as late as 1870, when working women were at least allowed to have their own earnings; but wives couldn't own any property of their own until 1882.
No wonder unscrupulous men were desperate to marry heiresses - they didn't only get to share her wealth, it was all theirs to do as they liked with. No wonder parents were so wary of fortune-hunters.


Ellen | 88 comments Jenny wrote: "A reminder of what could happen when a married woman owned nothing of her own, not even her underwear!
This was the case in England as late as 1870, when working women were at least allowed to hav..."


So there might have been a very practical reason for not leaving your daughters much money. Not because you didn't trust them but because once they married they had no control over it anyway.


Jenny H (jenny_norwich) | 690 comments Oh, but don't forget that if you/they were careful it could 'buy' them a good husband! A girl with a good dowry always had a better choice.


message 19: by HJ (new) - rated it 3 stars

HJ | 948 comments Some things could be done with the marriage settlements, the agreements entered into just before the marriage, to protect the woman and her children. Property could be settled on them i.e. put into trust and secured that way. However, the trustees and not the woman would effectively control the property, I believe.


Karlyne Landrum | 3895 comments Hana wrote: ""I hope I am as respectable as Miss Tylney Long, and I believe it to be a fact that the Duke has proposed to her several times."

What, the Pocket Venus?" exclaimed Peregrine...."I thought Wellesle..."


What a sad story! Poor woman, to have gone so long trying to find a man who would love her for herself and then settling on a complete idiot. I loved his obituary-not a bit of sugar-coating!


message 21: by MaryC (new)

MaryC Clawsey | 480 comments There's a story, supposedly true, about an American widow in the 19th or even 18th century who was unable to remarry because even the very clothes on her back were considered part of her late husband's estate, and that estate was swamped with debts. Any man who married the widow would somehow be legally responsible for those debts. One determined suitor offered to buy her new clothes to be married in but was told that they would simply be considered a contribution to that encumbered estate. However, someone came up with a solution, and the couple sent out wedding invitations. As the ceremony was about to begin, the bride walked to a closet, handed her jacket to the maid of honor, and stepped inside. She then handed out the rest of her clothes, piece by piece, and extended her hand through a hole that had been cut in the door the day before. The ceremony proceeded, and once they had been pronounced man and wife, the groom handed the maid of honor a package, which she passed through the barely opened door. (And I didn't think about the implications of "barely" until I had typed it!) In a few minutes, the bride emerged in her new outfit, and the couple began a debt-free life.


QNPoohBear | 1353 comments Wives of abused husbands in England at this time (and later) were only allowed to leave home with the clothes on their backs - no money, no children, no nothing. I think Judith is right to turn her nose up at marriage but I sense a growing attraction to Worth. In America, the states decided on passing married women's property acts on a state by state basis. Elizabeth Cady Stanton began her women's rights crusade fighting for a married women's property act.

Judith is so headstrong. She really got herself into trouble with that race. As usual she acted without thinking things through. I'd almost rather see Worth lose his cool and get into a good fight with Judith. His carefully controlled anger would make me uncomfortable. She loses his good opinion, or so she thinks.

Perry is the male equivalent of a lovable widgeon. It's obvious Judith has the brains in the family. Perry's romance is very sweet.

I love Prinney! The Brighton Pavillion is so over the top. The scenes set there sound like they're too crazy to be true but they are. The Royal Dukes crack me up.

I am not thrilled with Worth. He's up to something but he doesn't tell anyone what he knows or what he's planning. Mr. Tavener is becoming obsessed with Judith.


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