Morales 2341 Spring 2015 Class MW discussion

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Race, Class, and Culture > It's a New Day- "Everyday Use"

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message 1: by Lillian (new)

Lillian Morales (LillianMorales) | 46 comments Mod
We usually admire a person who rises out of poverty to get an education and better her circumstances, but in this story, the reader does not generally identify with Dee or
sympathize with her. Why not? Do you see Dee as totally unlikable? Do you think those traits that appear to be her shortcomings are actually both common and necessary for someone to progress in life? Should we admire Mama and Maggie who are not willing to change?


message 2: by Shanda (new)

Shanda Brunson | 64 comments In the story by Alice Walker "Eveyday Use" Dee does rise out of poverty and get's her education and makes a better life for herself. The problem I feel with Dee is she has forgotten where she has come from. She has dismissed her mother and sister and all of her family's heritage. Now she thinks of herself as better and looks down upon her mother and sister. I do not see Dee as totally unlikeable for you do need to be somewhat ruthless in order to get by in this world especially as a minority she is a poor black women. In the long run her mother and sister were the reasons she rose above because she probably used them for motivation so if anything she should have been grateful. Another point where do you think Dee got her strength from(her mother) she raised her daughters worked hard and her sister to be burned so badly and survive. These women were strong even if Maggie is potrayed in the story as weak in my eyes she survived a severe burning. I do admire the mother and Maggie for this simple reason they work hard and they are happy with their lives. They stand for what they believe in and hold true to it. Dee only wants her past to show off while Mama and Maggie live it.


message 3: by Angel (new)

Angel Iduarte | 29 comments Dee has two different types of personalities depicted in the story, the early and the later more educated. It seems like when she was living at home she didn’t want anything more then to leave everything behind or rise above what was given to her. She was unhappy with the things she had early on in the story, and when she comes back to visit her mother it is totally the opposite. She seems more proud of her heritage and wants to remember what her family went through. I’m guessing it is like that for a lot of educated people. You learn where you coming from and you can’t help but to want to display your roots. Education opened Dee’s eyes to see the beauty in her past. I don’t think she is unlikable at all, I like that she wants her family’s heirlooms. The only thing I don’t like about Dee is that she comes back very demanding and tries to bully her sister out of her rightful property, the quilts.


message 4: by Luis (last edited Apr 27, 2015 10:14AM) (new)

Luis Gonzalez | 71 comments Alice Walker’s beautifully written work “Everyday Use”, shows the distinct difference, between the traditional view of heritage and the “modern” view of heritage. I do not find Dee unlikable, but I do find her misguided. While it is quite admirable that Dee has found a way to leave behind poverty and gain an education, it is quite saddening to find she has left behind the true importance of her heritage. After all, “heritage” are traditions, modes of thought, and remembrance of the struggle of one’s ancestors. Should a person refuse to change with the times in order to maintain heritage? The answer is definitely a NO! A person should adapt him or herself to the present era and never forget the toils of the people who came before them. Dee has forgotten where she came from. She is more worried about how the quilt was made rather than who the quilt is made by and what the meaning of the materials that make up the quilt. Dee stated, “I don’t want those. They are stitched around the borders by machine”. She is worried that the machine stitching would devalue the quilt. Maggie realized that the quilts have no true value, other than remembering their ancestors. Dee has changed her name to Wangero, because Dee is the name given by those who “oppressed” her, even though the name Dee has been used in her family for generations. Dee has lost touch with where her roots truly lie, she has lost touch with her past. She would rather flaunt her success to others and display it like she would like to do with those hand stitched quilts. Thankfully Maggie hasn’t forgotten her heritage. Maggie is not be perfect but she has remained true to her roots. But remaining true to her roots will keep her from advancing in the modern world. The true question is, where do we find an balance. In my opinion, honoring your heritage is a balance between Maggie’s train of thought and that of Dee’s. Maggie will be left behind if she does not adjust to society and Dee has been so caught up in society that she has forgotten where she comes from. One should never forget where he or she comes from and be willing to adjust in order to advance.


message 5: by Victoria (last edited Apr 27, 2015 08:20AM) (new)

Victoria Leal | 47 comments There are some people who simply think they are better than everyone else when they have made a good living. Some, like Dee, have risen out of poverty to get there and others are just born with a silver spoon in their mouth. No matter what though, you will get those certain people who will just look down on everyone else. In this story "Everyday Use" By Alice Walker Dee has always presented herself high and mighty throughout her life. Her mother sees it when she starts creating a style for herself. Later when Dee comes back home after a while to visit her mom and sister Maggie. She shows up with a man by her side, a different name, and beautiful wardrobe. The way her mother describes her you would have never thought they she came from poverty. At time in this shorty story Dee does seem unlikable just for that fact that she walks around with her head up high thinking she is better than everyone else. Personally I like the fact that she acts like that, she is proud of her accomplishments and she is showing that. Though it isn't necessary to act like that around her family. In the end I believe Dee makes a valid point to her mother but is also contracting herself because she isn't in touch with her background either "It's really a new day for us. But from the way you and Mama still live you'd ever know it." At that point it is becoming better for African Americans and Dee is embracing that while her mother and sister are still at home doing the same things. And I believe she wants those quilts because deep down I think Dee knows she is losing touch with her heritage and taking those quilts wouldn't make her feel as guilty.


message 6: by Yvonne (new)

Yvonne Torres | 72 comments Although it is extremely important to be educated, there’s nothing worse than smart people who rub it in the faces of others who are less intelligent. Not even the highest IQ score can make you happy. Life is about being content and if you are content where you’re at in your life and happy with who you are than who’s to tell you otherwise. It’s always good to evolve and change with the times but not when it compromises who you are and what you believe in. I believe people should always strive for more but I believe each person should set their own goal. Once you have reached your goal then be content whether it has met the standards and expectations of others or not. This is what we see in the short story “Everyday Use” by Alice Walker. Dee did what made her happy. She left for college, became educated, and went along with trends and fashions. Although Dee’s head was inflated, she wasn't completely unlikable. Despite her attitude towards her mother for not giving her the quilts, her intentions for them were not bad at all. She recognized that her heritage was important and that conserving it was crucial. Some people might view Mama and Maggie as ignorant for not willing to change but they were content and in the end that’s all that matters.

“Maggie smiled; maybe at the sunglasses. But a real smile, not scared.” Everyday Use by Alice Walker


message 7: by Kimberly (last edited Apr 27, 2015 09:41AM) (new)

Kimberly Teran | 54 comments In "Every Day Use" by Alice Walker, I personally dont sympathize with Dee because of the changes she has made to her attitude. I admire Dee because like many women I've known, she has risen out of poverty, gained an educatioin, and better herself. Like my own mother, started from the very bottom from picking up tomatoes and cotton and crossing the U.S border through the river undocumented to better herself. Dee did it too. The difference is that Dee has forgotten where she comes from. She is in a way ashamed of her family's life, which thanks to her single mother she had the opportunity to get an education. Dee is not all unlikeable because I admire the effort she did in life to bring herself out of poverty. What I don'admire is when she states that Dee is dead. "No Mama, not 'Dee', Wangero Leewanika Kemanjo" She says and her mother replies "What happened to Dee?" and Dee replies "She's Dead. I couldn't bear it any longer, being named after the poeple who oppress me." That is really sad. That saddened me actually, she is just so ashamed of her roots. I admire Mama and Maggie unwillingness to change because that means they are sticking to their culture and roots, I would only like for Maggie to get an education herself.


message 8: by Pearl (last edited Apr 27, 2015 10:38AM) (new)

Pearl Pena | 74 comments In the short story “Everyday Use” by Alice Walker, Dee rises out of poverty by getting an education and bettering her circumstances. I feel that in the story the reader doesn’t generally sympathize with her because she ultimately forgot about her roots. It states that Dee hadn’t bothered to visit home or her mother and sister in a while.It seemed as if she was ashamed of her family and her cultural origins. Finally when she does, they anticipate her visit and it was not a pleasant one. They find out that she had changed her name, knowing that it was passed on from an ancestor to her. She also began to point out some decorations she wanted to take to her new home to display. But most of all she wanted the quilts her grandmother had made by hand and was shocked by them being denied to her by her mother. Something that was probably a first coming from her mother. It is obvious that she had only returned home to collect items to hang in her home. Before leaving the home she scowls her mother and sister stating that they should really do something with their lives. I don’t feel as if she would be a totally unlikeable person, but rather more of a saddened feeling for her because she does not know that she has forgotten the importance of her heritage. She lacks the true value and importance behind the quilts and Maggie will be the one who will really appreciate them. At the end Mama and Maggie smiled at each other, a real smile, not a scared one. They were ultimately content with themselves proving that they were happy.

“She gasped like a bee had stung her.” -”Everyday Use” by Alice Walker


message 9: by Nancy (new)

Nancy | 22 comments In the story "Every Day Use" by Alice Walker, me as a reader don't sympathize with Dee because of the kind of person she is. At the beginning all she could think of was leaving her house. Then she had a good education and made a good progress in life. I noticed that she was kind of embarrassed of her past when in the story it says, "She wrote me once that no matter where we "choose" to live, she will manage to come see us. But she will never bring her friends." By reading that we can conclude that Dee didn't wanted for her circle of friends from the different society to see where she came from. There is always the good and the bad sister in the family. In this case, Maggie is the good sister that even though her mother promised that she would give her the quilts, she told Dee that she could keep them. I think Maggie did that because she didn't wanted her mother to keep arguing with Dee, and also because she had a good heart since the beginning of the story.


message 10: by Kirsten (new)

Kirsten Nelson | 62 comments In the story "Everyday Use" by Alice walker, I believe the author did not admire her as much because she changed her heritage. Dee didn't really admire her family because her family comes from a poor area. Unfortunately, when Dee got her education she forgot where she came from, Dee wanted the best of everything which was something her family couldn't have. Also, When Mama wanted Maggie to keep the quilt that has been passed down from generation to generation, Dee wanted to take it away. The mother states, "I didnt want to bring up how I had offered Dee a quilt when she went away to college. . she had told me they were old-fashion, and out of style." In the end, Maggie let Dee take the quilts so it could clear the tension in the air, "She can have them, Mama.. I can 'member grandma Dee without the quilts." These two quotes show how her Dee's attitude changed from everything being "old-fashion" to wanting something that was passed down from generations that wasn't going to be given to her. I do not believe that the traits that appear to be her shortcomings are actually both common and necessary for someone to progress in life. Dee made her own decision which lead her to become the person she is. She is not disliked either. Everybody in this story made their own choices and went through their own difficulties; therefore, I believe everyone in this story could be seen as admirable.


message 11: by Rogerio (new)

Rogerio Ruiz | 39 comments The story by Alice Walker Everyday Use. From all the odds Dee raised up when she needed to have courage. I sympathize with Dee, she had the opportunity to get an education and she had enough courage to attend college. Dee probably faced a lot of discrimination during her school years and found comfort in Hakim-a-barber. Dee was fearless and willing to learn and progress as her own person without her mother’s “quilt” and lack of education. We all need drive to succeed and we all find our own drive in different ways; Dee’s drive was one of the most common, she was poor and had uneducated single mother. Mama and Maggie definitely hard workers and content with their lives, but I don’t think they reached their potential. Is Maggie attending college as well? Mama and Maggie are willing to change? I think they are afraid of change and afraid of Dee.


message 12: by Marielena (new)

Marielena Franco | 43 comments Yes, I agree that we usually admire a person who rises out of poverty to get a brighter future and works hard to get an education and better her circumstances. But in this story Dee does over come every life situation everyone would admire but the author does not seem to sympathize with Dee in any way. Why, because Dee seems to feel better and greater than everyone else and now looks at people like if they’re less than her because she has an education. Dee had forgotten where she has come from. I do not believe Dee is totally unlikeable because I actually understand why she is the way she is. Because Dee has accomplished so much in life she is proud of her self and accomplished many things. Yes I do think those particular traits that appear to be her shortcomings are actually both common and necessary for someone to progress in life but sometimes especially for a poor black women years ago things were very hard. Well I think that everyone deserved credit fir something but admire mama and Maggie yes why not they both went thought something that was difficult in life and overcame it in different ways and because of them two Dee is where she is now.


message 13: by Leslie (last edited Apr 28, 2015 08:03AM) (new)

Leslie (lesliemadai) | 50 comments The story "Every Day Use" by Alice Walker is a story about a girl who surpasses poverty and her mother, just like any mother, is one to overcome anything in order to send her daughter off to pursue a career. Even though she has two daughters, Dee and Maggie, Mama seems to support one more. Maggie is the quiet daughter; the one with burn scars all over her body and as a reader one can say she has self-esteem issues. Dee in the other hand has everything to her advantage and she has the support from her mother, something Maggie doesn’t. Even though Mama helped Dee get where she is now, Dee seems to be ashamed of where she came from because she even changes her name. Even though Mama doesn’t snap at Dee, she seems to be supportive of her decision. In Mama’s head she is wondering why is it that she changed her name but she believes it’s better to leave it how it is. When Dee returns home she seems like a total different being and instead greeting her mom like a daughter who misses her mother, she takes out a camera and starts taking pictures of Mama and Maggie. We usually admire a person who rises out of poverty to get an education and better her circumstances, but in this story I believe there is so many things Dee performs that is just so unlikeable of her character. Just the fact that she changes her name goes to show how pitiful of a person she is. Just because she has a career and an education background doesn’t mean she has to change her name and belittle the people who once gave her their hand to be where she is know. A name says a lot about yourself and where you came from, she didn’t even consider consulting her mother for her opinion. “I used to think she hated Maggie, too. But that was before we raised the money, the church and me, to send her to Augusta to school. She used to read to us without pity; forcing words, lies, other folks' habits, whole lives upon us two, sitting trapped and ignorant underneath her voice […] Pressed us to her with the serious way she read, to shove us away at just the moment, like dimwits, we seemed about to understand." This quote goes to show that she felt like she was better than her mother and sister, when maybe she was, but instead of her to trying and teach them a thing or two, she just acts superior to them. Even though Mama and Maggie are not two persons to want to overcome where they are at now, I don’t feel that as a reader I can say that I admire them or say that I don’t admire them. Some people rather help others to get somewhere in life than do it themselves, it’s easier.


message 14: by Kimberly (last edited Apr 27, 2015 12:28PM) (new)

Kimberly Teran | 54 comments Victoria wrote: "There are some people who simply think they are better than everyone else when they have made a good living. Some, like Dee, have risen out of poverty to get there and others are just born with a s..."

I felt as if when she said "But from the way you and Mama still live you'd never know it" it was a little offensive. Her mama helped her bring herself to success by raising money with the community for her school, and does she ever offer any kind of help to bring them out of poverty. Any gratefulness towards her mother will be very appreciated as well. If Mama felt like if Dee really deserved those quilts I think she would have let her take them, but instead she kept them for Maggie.


message 15: by Yvonne (new)

Yvonne Torres | 72 comments Shanda wrote: "In the story by Alice Walker "Eveyday Use" Dee does rise out of poverty and get's her education and makes a better life for herself. The problem I feel with Dee is she has forgotten where she has c..."


I like what Shanda says, “Dee only wants her past to show off while Mama and Maggie live it.” I agree that Dee was trying to show off that she came from the African heritage while her mother and sister lived it.


message 16: by Alicia (new)

Alicia | 56 comments Who wouldn’t admire someone who has overcome poverty and now has a better life/ education? I would because they are breaking the chains of the old life cycle. In “Every Day Use” by Alice Walker, she lets us view how two sisters value their heritage in a different way. Alice start her story by describing the way Dee’s family life is and how mother wanted for Dee to admire her for what she is. Instead the mother says, “I am the way my daughter would want to be: a hundred pounds lighter, my skin like an uncooked barley pancake.” It seems be that Dee is ashamed of her roots in the beginning of the story. Then in the story she changes her mind in trying to appreciate her heritage but in a very different way. She takes pictures and want to take certain objects from her mom’s house to use them for decoration, not to demonstrate her heritage. She is very demanding. I think she is unlikable because of the she has changed. Someone who changes their name that has a great meaning to the family, but you think it “oppresses” you; its being an unappreciated to your roots. Then she asks her mom for the quilts that were made by her aunt Big Dee and her mom with pieces of her great grandmother, grandmother and grandfather; she wants them to be hanged, to be displayed. Instead of keeping them because of the family value they have. In the other hand, Maggie is a humble lady and shy. I loved it when she said, “She can have them, Mama….. I can ‘member Grandma Dee without the quilts.” That made me understand that Maggie does not need something to show her heritage. She is proud from where she comes, her roots. The only thing I do feel is that Maggie will always remain in a close minded world because she needs education to be prosperous in the world.
“She used to read to us without pity; forcing words, lies, other folks’ habits, whole lives upon us two, sitting trapped and ignorant underneath her voice.” – Alice Walker


message 17: by Kirsten (new)

Kirsten Nelson | 62 comments Alicia wrote: "Who wouldn’t admire someone who has overcome poverty and now has a better life/ education? I would because they are breaking the chains of the old life cycle. In “Every Day Use” by Alice Walker, sh..."

Maggie was very nice in the story she let Dee have the quilts, those quilts were suppose to be used for her wedding. In my opinion Maggie made Dee look really bad and selfish.


message 18: by Suzette (last edited Apr 27, 2015 01:20PM) (new)

Suzette Sanchez (slelysanchez) | 53 comments In the story everyday use, Dee once was where her mother was, in poverty, she grew up and left, even changed her name. This does happen in poverty families. She went on to succeed in her life, like she says in the end, "its really a new day for us, But the way you and mama still live, youd never know it" She stood out, to her family, mama saw her like a sore thumb, but she was brave, she made a choice, a choice that brought her happiness. I think the author doesnt sympathize with her because of the tragedy that happened, mamas house burning down, and her daughter being badly burned. Yes its sad, its almost as if Mama thought about that everyday and kept her from moving forward. The author emphasized a lot on that situation because it was a tragedy, it makes us as reader feel bad and feel sorry. It made Dee look like she left her family behind. In every family, it has its traditions and cultures. In this one, the quilts held sentimental value, the quilts were Maggies grandmothers quilts that she made, and to Dee they were very special, she said if Mama gave them to dee she would use them for "everyday use" that expressed she would use them carelessly i felt, Mama then realized it. and ended up staying with them. Dee is a likable person, she is a strong person. She did what Maggie and Mama could never do. She has every reason to walk with her nose up in the air. I don't believe she behaves this way purposely, but becoming educated changes a person, especially Dee.


message 19: by Yvonne (new)

Yvonne Torres | 72 comments Pearl wrote: "In the short story “Everyday Use” by Alice Walker, Dee rises out of poverty by getting an education and bettering her circumstances. I feel that in the story the reader doesn’t generally sympathize..."

I agree with Pearl that Mama and Maggie were truly content with their way of life. They were traditional women that were happily stuck in their ways.


message 20: by Luis (new)

Luis Gonzalez | 71 comments Suzette wrote: "In the story everyday use, Dee once was where her mother was, in poverty, she grew up and left, even changed her name. This does happen in poverty families. She went on to succeed in her life, like..."

I agree that gaining an education does change a person. I do not agree with Dee's arrogance. She does not see herself as her family's equal and even looks down at them. In my opinion, she wants the quilt and the photographs for bragging rights.


message 21: by Luis (new)

Luis Gonzalez | 71 comments Yvonne wrote: "Although it is extremely important to be educated, there’s nothing worse than smart people who rub it in the faces of others who are less intelligent. Not even the highest IQ score can make you hap..."

I agree that Dee is arrogant. She has left, gained a education, and now attempts to change her appearance and beliefs. She wants to change everything about her, but she is not much different than Maggie and Mamma. She is just like them but is now educated.


message 22: by Shanda (new)

Shanda Brunson | 64 comments Alicia wrote: "Who wouldn’t admire someone who has overcome poverty and now has a better life/ education? I would because they are breaking the chains of the old life cycle. In “Every Day Use” by Alice Walker, sh..."
I do admire Dee for getting her education and making a better life for herself. I just don't agree with how she treats her mother and sister. You should never forget where you come from. I think this makes her snotty and conceited like she is better. When she goes in the house just taking things without asking was rude and inconsiderate and she should not have treated her mother that way.


message 23: by Shanda (new)

Shanda Brunson | 64 comments Victoria wrote: "There are some people who simply think they are better than everyone else when they have made a good living. Some, like Dee, have risen out of poverty to get there and others are just born with a s..."
I commend Dee for rising out of poverty and that is something to be proud of. I also believe there also comes a point of arrogance that Dee has that makes her unlikeable. She has to remember if it wasn't for her mother she would not have had the role model to be a strong women to overcome. You can better yourself but don't forget where you come from for than what is your true identity and beliefs. For me changing her name was the ultimate denial of her heritage to her mother.


message 24: by Suzette (new)

Suzette Sanchez (slelysanchez) | 53 comments Alicia wrote: "Who wouldn’t admire someone who has overcome poverty and now has a better life/ education? I would because they are breaking the chains of the old life cycle. In “Every Day Use” by Alice Walker, sh..."

I couldnt agree with you more Alicia. Dee made it, she wasnt looked upon. she strived to do more and believed her sister could do just the same. Though Mama and Maggie were to comfortable with having so little.


message 25: by Suzette (last edited Apr 27, 2015 08:19PM) (new)

Suzette Sanchez (slelysanchez) | 53 comments Luis wrote: "Suzette wrote: "In the story everyday use, Dee once was where her mother was, in poverty, she grew up and left, even changed her name. This does happen in poverty families. She went on to succeed i..."

I dont think she looks down at them. She has a lot of pride. she should have pride. she believes her sister can do better if she tried, Maggie is comfortable with having so little. Dee tells Maggie she should do something, that showed me that she believes if Maggie tries to, she could. Dee didn't settle... Of course she was ashamed of the quilts at first when Mama offered her to take them when she went off to school, But she was much younger... I just felt very proud of Dee. I know we shouldnt forget where we came from.... but what would have been easier, for Dee to stick around with Mama and Maggie, or for her to get an education?


message 26: by Scarlett (last edited Apr 27, 2015 09:48PM) (new)

Scarlett Prazaline | 41 comments The short story written by Alice Walker "Every Day Use", Dee isn't that much of an unlikeable character. I find her character arrogantly young and a bit too cocky with the education she was able to have with the help of the church. In the beginning while living at home all she wanted was to get away from it all. Once she comes back, she almost seems proud to be apart of the African heritage of her ancestors. She comes about it in a very rude almost taking ownership of what she wants to keep as a piece of her heritage. I see Mama as a women who just cannot believe how her daughter has changed. I get the sense that Mama feels like if Dee is embarrassed by her. I don't think Dee intends to make Mama feel that way, I think Dee is just proud that she has been able to have an education. I think that Dee wants to show that she worked hard to get there. However, the way she is about it, isn't right. So maybe she could be unlikeable, but at the same time I see her as a real human being. At some point in our lives we have flaunted things we are proud of to others. Its not right, but it is something that every human I think does whether it is intentionally or unintentionally.


message 27: by Alicia (new)

Alicia | 56 comments Suzette wrote: "In the story everyday use, Dee once was where her mother was, in poverty, she grew up and left, even changed her name. This does happen in poverty families. She went on to succeed in her life, like..."
Dee is succeeding because now she has an education but she is not proud of her heritage. If she would of being proud she would of kept her name and not change it. She was named after her ancestors, which it meant a lot to her mother. And regarding the quilts, she wanted them just to display only not because it had a sentimental value to her.


message 28: by Leslie (new)

Leslie (lesliemadai) | 50 comments Shanda wrote: "In the story by Alice Walker "Eveyday Use" Dee does rise out of poverty and get's her education and makes a better life for herself. The problem I feel with Dee is she has forgotten where she has c..."

Definitely with you on this one Shanda. I believe Dee was not proud where she came from, but did want everyone to know that she made it out of poverty. Even though she comes back home, she seems to use it to her advantage and takes important things to keep as trophies in my eyes. About Maggie and Mama, I don't say I admire them or that I don't, I just believe that Dee could have done more for them and Mama could of told her something about her not being thankful.


message 29: by Leslie (new)

Leslie (lesliemadai) | 50 comments Kirsten wrote: "In the story "Everyday Use" by Alice walker, I believe the author did not admire her as much because she changed her heritage. Dee didn't really admire her family because her family comes from a po..."

I agree with you Kirsten. I thing you are right when you say that everyone can be seen miserable because they all did something to their advantage. Even though you can say that Mama wanted to use Dee to fulfill the dreams she pictures on her head, you can also say that Dee used Mama to be where she is at now. To me, Maggie seems irrelevant in the story because she doesn't tell anything to her sister about being pathetic. Maggie as a sister could have told her something in regards of changing her name.


message 30: by Kirsten (new)

Kirsten Nelson | 62 comments Leslie wrote: "The story "Every Day Use" by Alice Walker is a story about a girl who surpasses poverty and her mother, just like any mother, is one to overcome anything in order to send her daughter off to pursue..."

I can see why Dee is unlikable. I personally don't dislike Dee. She is just being herself and going through different phases of her life.


message 31: by Nancy (new)

Nancy | 22 comments Kimberly wrote: "In "Every Day Use" by Alice Walker, I personally dont sympathize with Dee because of the changes she has made to her attitude. I admire Dee because like many women I've known, she has risen out of ..."

I agree with Kimberly because she is right because Dee did better herself, but she also forgot where she came from. I didn't sympathize with Dee because she even changed her name, she was so ashamed of her past and that made her mother sad and also Maggie. Those kind of actions reflect on what type of person Dee really is, she didn't care about her family, she only worried about herself.


message 32: by Rosie (last edited Apr 28, 2015 10:42AM) (new)

Rosie Castillo | 61 comments In the story "Everyday Use" by Alice Walker in my believe is that she is not unlikable. She has been able to have the chance to get a better education and over seek her self out of poverty. I believe anyone can admire a person who rises out of poverty to get a better education. But, I do not agree that she should feel better than anyone else. Dee knew exactly where she can from and how she lived and her heritage. I myself do not believe that she is unlikable but she has forgotten of her roots and culture. As, for Mama and Maggie I believe that at the end they both were happy and that's all they need.


message 33: by Rosie (new)

Rosie Castillo | 61 comments Luis wrote: "Alice Walker’s beautifully written work “Everyday Use”, shows the distinct difference, between the traditional view of heritage and the “modern” view of heritage. I do not find Dee unlikable, but ..."

Luis i agree with you on that Dee is unlikable but, yes maybe she has misguide herself. I also believe that she should of not forgotten about her heritage where she came from.


message 34: by Rosie (new)

Rosie Castillo | 61 comments Scarlett wrote: "The short story written by Alice Walker "Every Day Use", Dee isn't that much of an unlikeable character. I find her character arrogantly young and a bit too cocky with the education she was able to..."

I agree with you on Dee is much more arrogant. I also agree with you on that Mama could not believe on how much her daughter has changed. It must be sad seeing on how her daughter has changed so much that even her name has changed.


message 35: by Pearl (new)

Pearl Pena | 74 comments Luis wrote: "Alice Walker’s beautifully written work “Everyday Use”, shows the distinct difference, between the traditional view of heritage and the “modern” view of heritage. I do not find Dee unlikable, but ..."

Luis, I agree with you that Dee is not merely unlikable just a bit misguided. I believe that her intentions for the quilts were not bad, but she went about it the wrong way. She shouldn't of been demanding and snobby with her mother and sister and ultimately leaving the way she did.


message 36: by Pearl (new)

Pearl Pena | 74 comments Marielena wrote: "Yes, I agree that we usually admire a person who rises out of poverty to get a brighter future and works hard to get an education and better her circumstances. But in this story Dee does over come..."

Marielena, I agree with you that we tend to admire individuals who have overcome difficulties to rise out of poverty because it proves to us that they have worked hard to achieve their accomplishments. But I do not believe that Dee should feel the need to be snobby and demanding with her mother and sister after it is because of her mother that she aspired in life.


message 37: by Alicia (new)

Alicia | 56 comments Victoria wrote: "There are some people who simply think they are better than everyone else when they have made a good living. Some, like Dee, have risen out of poverty to get there and others are just born with a s..."
I like that Dee got an education, but i do not like her attitude with her mom And sister. She should be appreciated with her mom because her mom raised the money to pay her education. And definitely she has changed with her family.


message 38: by Hilda (last edited Apr 28, 2015 08:04PM) (new)

Hilda Aguilar | 54 comments Rosie wrote: "In the story "Everyday Use" by Alice Walker in my believe is that she is not unlikable. She has been able to have the chance to get a better education and over seek her self out of poverty. I belie..."

I agree Dee is an unlikable person. It is good that she bettered and improved herself but she shouldn't have forgotten her background. She once came from poverty but since she got an education she thought she was better than everyone else. That changed her way to much in a negative way.


message 39: by Hilda (last edited Apr 28, 2015 08:22PM) (new)

Hilda Aguilar | 54 comments In the short story "Everyday Use" , I believe the reader does not sympathize with Dee because she had forgotten where she came from. Dee was able to step out of poverty and pursue her education. She changed who she was and that change lost her connection to her past. She had even changed her name. "No, Mama," she says. "Not 'Dee,' Wangero Leewanika Kemanjo!""What happened to 'Dee'?" I wanted to know."She's dead," Wangero said. "I couldn't bear it any longer, being named after the people who oppress me."One would admire a person for stepping out of poverty and becoming successful but in this case I believe Dee is an unlikable person. I think someone should be proud about themselves when it comes to such an accomplishment but Dee believed she was above everyone else because she was educated. Change is good but she shouldn't have forgotten her past, and her culture. That is who she was before she received an education.


message 40: by Hilda (last edited Apr 28, 2015 08:20PM) (new)

Hilda Aguilar | 54 comments Nancy wrote: "In the story "Every Day Use" by Alice Walker, me as a reader don't sympathize with Dee because of the kind of person she is. At the beginning all she could think of was leaving her house. Then she ..."

I agree Dee was ashamed of her roots, and it is sadden that she even changed her name. She believes she is higher than her family. Telling Mama and Maggie that they should try to make something out of themselves and even pointing out the way they lived. Dee made it seem like she has never lived that way. She had forgotten that she came from the same place her family remained.


message 41: by Scarlett (new)

Scarlett Prazaline | 41 comments Suzette wrote: "In the story everyday use, Dee once was where her mother was, in poverty, she grew up and left, even changed her name. This does happen in poverty families. She went on to succeed in her life, like..."

I agree with you suzette. I also think that part of Dee changing was to do living in another environment. Outside yes, she was able to appreciate her African culture. Inside, going back to Mama, she was almost neglecting to accept her direct family roots.


message 42: by Scarlett (new)

Scarlett Prazaline | 41 comments Hilda wrote: "In the short story "Everyday Use" , I believe the reader does not sympathize with Dee because she had forgotten where she came from. Dee was able to step out of poverty and pursue her education. Sh..."

I think she is big headed in how she flaunts her education, when in all Mama and the church help raise money to send her to college. She isn't even appreciative. She becomes heartless, when she tells Mama "Dee is dead."


message 43: by Rogerio (new)

Rogerio Ruiz | 39 comments Nancy wrote: "In the story "Every Day Use" by Alice Walker, me as a reader don't sympathize with Dee because of the kind of person she is. At the beginning all she could think of was leaving her house. Then she ..."

You made some good points on Dee's attitude, but I try to give her the benefit of the doubt. Maybe she was trying to impress the boyfriend/husband or maybe she did feel ashamed where she came from but that does not mean she heated her mother or sister I felt her frustration seeing their family living the way they did. Taking pictures of what made her happy in her childhood. Okay I'll get down my soapbox.


message 44: by Rogerio (new)

Rogerio Ruiz | 39 comments Yvonne wrote: "Although it is extremely important to be educated, there’s nothing worse than smart people who rub it in the faces of others who are less intelligent. Not even the highest IQ score can make you hap..."

I agree with you that people with high IQ's can be arrogant and unpleasant, there is common sense on how we should treat each other.I don't believe Dee meant to offend her mother or her sister, she was just trying to impress her boyfriend/husband. If it was me acting this way and realized what I did my world would probably crumble and I would feel ashamed.


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