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Fan Fiction/Continuations > Any more JA retellings?

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ᏒIᎪlᎥstᎥc (rialistic) | 40 comments Ugh. I just finished reading a pretty bad modern YA retelling of Pride and Prejudice called Prom and Prejudice- read my review.

Anyways, I was wondering if anyone has read any GOOD Austen retellings, preferably modern YA, (though I read a really good sci-fi one called For Darkness Shows the Stars).

Any suggestions? What do you think about retellings? Is there already a thread for this with lots of suggestions and lists? TELL ME!


message 2: by Louise Sparrow (new)

Louise Sparrow (louisex) | 300 comments Try Pride's Prejudice by Misty Dawn Pulsipher. You can see my review of that here https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


message 3: by Ceri (new)

Ceri | 68 comments I have a bookshelf for modern books based on Austen books if that helps: https://www.goodreads.com/review/list...


message 4: by LulaM (new)

LulaM (incee) My favorite:
Mr Darcy falls in love
And since you mentioned the sci-fi one, I also love this short story from the same author:
Mr Darcy and the Space-time Continuum


message 5: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 582 comments Modern YA Enthusiasm and middle-grades Scones and Sensibility
YA time-travel Prada and Prejudice

The Jane Austen Takes the South series is slightly older than YA but similar in style.


ᏒIᎪlᎥstᎥc (rialistic) | 40 comments QNPoohBear wrote: "Modern YA Enthusiasm and middle-grades Scones and Sensibility
YA time-travel Prada and Prejudice

The Jane Austen Takes the South series is slightly ol..."


I looked at the summary for Scones and it seems to be a modern Emma. Why does it have a title like Sense?


message 7: by Ceri (new)

Ceri | 68 comments Cecilia Gray, Rosie Rushton and Jenni James have all written modern YA updates of Austen's works.


message 8: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 582 comments ᏒIᎪlᎥstᎥc wrote: "I looked at the summary for Scones and it seems to be a modern Emma. Why does it have a title like Sense?"

Maybe because the character has too much sensibility? It's a cute tribute to Jane Austen and L.M. Montgomery


ᏒIᎪlᎥstᎥc (rialistic) | 40 comments QNPoohBear wrote: "ᏒIᎪlᎥstᎥc wrote: "I looked at the summary for Scones and it seems to be a modern Emma. Why does it have a title like Sense?"

Maybe because the character has too much sensibility? It's a cute tribu..."


Is the character like Anne?


message 10: by Hannah (new)

Hannah | 123 comments If you want something humorous and quirky, Sense and Sensibility and Sea Monsters is really fun. :)


message 11: by Abigail (new)

Abigail Bok (regency_reader) | 475 comments Hi, Theodora, do you want contemporary retellings or period retellings? There are thousands to choose from!

My favorite period one might be the Darcy’s Tale series by Stan Hurd (don’t hold it against him that he’s a man!). The first in the series is Into Hertfordshire; it’s a three-volume set but don’t be dismayed, they read pretty quickly.

For a contemporary one, maybe try Pen and Prejudice by Claire M. Johnson. There are many good ones!

To answer your question properly, the best thing you could do is to mosey on over to a Goodreads group called Austenesque Lovers TBR Pile Reading Challenge 2016. This is a group devoted entirely to reading and discussing Austen retellings! You can check out the conversations or look at the bookshelves.


message 12: by Louise Sparrow (new)

Louise Sparrow (louisex) | 300 comments I read some P&P one's for a challenge a couple of years ago, and Stan's was definitely one of the best to keep in line with the book (but from Darcy's POV).

There are some fun ones out there too like Pulse and Prejudice and Pirates and Prejudice.

My reviews can be found here if that helps at all:

https://www.goodreads.com/review/list...


message 13: by Sophia (new)

Sophia Meredith (sophiameredith) | 5 comments Hi there, I loved Stan's books too! I'm also a writer and On Oakham Mount--a variation-- is available for pre-order on Amazon as well as Kindle unlimited. There is also a sample on the books Goodreads page!

In any event, I'm writing because I need help with something. I get so into the Jane zone sometimes that I can't recall if this was my line or her's "...Lady Catherine, whose meddlesome nature provoked more often than it pleased..." I searched everywhere in the text, including my original draft in which I highlighted Jane excerpts in blue. Not sure why it matters to me, except that I think it's a pretty great line and I'd love to attribute it to myself...;-) Well, I was also thinking of including it in my second book "Miss Darcy's Companion," but not sure I will do so if it's simply plagiarism of my own writing! If someone can let me know where in P&P this may be, I'd appreciate it! Otherwise I might continue to erroneously pat myself on the back for this one.

I hope you'll take a look at the book or even the excerpt for now. The JustJane1813 blog will have a review within the next couple of weeks! Love to hear your thoughts.


message 14: by Ceri (new)

Ceri | 68 comments If you google for searchable text of Pride and Prejudice you can plug in one of the more unusual words of the quote and see whether it turns up. I don't think I recognise it.


message 15: by Jon (new)

Jon Abbott | 32 comments I'll admit to another secret pleasure: Amish-theme books. Sarah Price is one of the better authors in that romance, mystery or Christian sub-genre. She's published a Persuasion novel: Second Chances. I downloaded the sample.

The problem is this: The opening is so similar to P that I feel I could write the rest of the plot myself, with the only unanswered question being whether Anne's Amish father and sisters will get over their pride in the end. Will faith in the Lord do something that exceeds the ending of P? The drawback with Amish-theme books is complete HEAs. Austin's Persuasion is much more nuanced.

My question: Is Second Chances anything other than totally predictable and worth the money?


message 16: by Ceri (new)

Ceri | 68 comments I haven't read it, but I think it's likely that the book is going to be very close to Persuasion. With Austen-inspired books the main plot lines are likely to be pretty predictable as part of the enjoyment comes from seeing how the author makes the storyline work in a different environment.


message 17: by Sophia (new)

Sophia Meredith (sophiameredith) | 5 comments Ceri wrote: "If you google for searchable text of Pride and Prejudice you can plug in one of the more unusual words of the quote and see whether it turns up. I don't think I recognise it."

Yep! Already did that and didn't find it there, so maybe it is me!


message 18: by Suzan (new)

Suzan Lauder (suzan_lauder) | 14 comments Sophia wrote: "Ceri wrote: "If you google for searchable text of Pride and Prejudice you can plug in one of the more unusual words of the quote and see whether it turns up. I don't think I recognise it."

Yep! Al..."

I think it's you. I suppose you've already tried googling the whole or parts of the phrase. If it's in a book, Google books tends to come up with it. I got nothing. Using the Austen Thesaurus, she never used "meddlesome," but it's a Regency word. I think it's a great phrase and you should enjoy using it!


message 19: by Stanley (new)

Stanley Hurd | 25 comments Sophia: what Suzan said! :-)


message 20: by Sophia (new)

Sophia Meredith (sophiameredith) | 5 comments Suzan wrote: "Sophia wrote: "Ceri wrote: "If you google for searchable text of Pride and Prejudice you can plug in one of the more unusual words of the quote and see whether it turns up. I don't think I recognis..."

An Austen Thesaurus? Where has this been all my life? Imagine her never using the word meddlesome! Thanks for helping me out on this one.


message 21: by Tony (last edited Mar 08, 2016 08:29AM) (new)

Tony (tony_aguila) | 39 comments Suzan wrote: “… Using the Austen Thesaurus, she never used “meddlesome,” but it’s a Regency word. I think it’s a great phrase and you should enjoy using it! …”

Not true. In Sanditon, Jane wrote: “… Sidney Parker, she decided, was as meddlesome as his sister Diana. …” It’s not a new word to Jane, its etymology going as far back as the early 1600s, but was obviously not one of her favorites.

With all due respect to the Write Like Jane Austen site, they ought not to limit their database to only the major works. Her letters reveal a lot of “informal” usage that are not evident in her novels.


message 22: by Suzan (new)

Suzan Lauder (suzan_lauder) | 14 comments Tony wrote: "Suzan wrote: “… Using the Austen Thesaurus, she never used “meddlesome,” but it’s a Regency word. I think it’s a great phrase and you should enjoy using it! …”

Not true. In Sanditon, Jane wrote: “..."

This isn't the first time I've seen a word missing in the Thesaurus. One was missing that was in NA too. One big concern I have is that many of the words cited as synonyms were not used in that context until post-Regency. They're modern synonyms. It's still good to refer to an etymology source, as they use a number of ways to analyze language to know when a definition was expanded.


message 23: by Sophia (new)

Sophia Meredith (sophiameredith) | 5 comments Wow! I had no idea there was a Write like Austen site. Is that cheating? ;-) I worked on my "voice" by reading her books!


message 24: by Suzan (new)

Suzan Lauder (suzan_lauder) | 14 comments Sophia wrote: "Wow! I had no idea there was a Write like Austen site. Is that cheating? ;-) I worked on my "voice" by reading her books!"
On Oakham Mount A Pride & Prejudice Variation (Pemberley Departures, #1) by Sophia Meredith
Per the title of this thread, congrats on your upcoming release of "On Oakham Mount!" It's eagerly anticipated by many, especially since you've shown us that pretty cover. I know you put a great deal of effort into making this book the best of your ability, with an awesome team of betas. Thank you. Readers appreciate quality in JAFF.

As for techniques to improve "voice," I try to emulate certain aspects of Austen's style of writing too, and it's fun! Readers enjoy a slight nod to her books while ensuring the story is still within their comfort zone of language and structure. Sometimes an author needs a word, and an iterative approach on http://www.writelikeausten.com/ helps find one that "feels" right to fit both approaches, and you're far less likely to be anachronistic than if you'd used the thesaurus on Word or other web sites. Other authors have told me I'm not the only one who has it open on a tab while writing.


message 25: by Sophia (new)

Sophia Meredith (sophiameredith) | 5 comments Suzan wrote: "Sophia wrote: "Wow! I had no idea there was a Write like Austen site. Is that cheating? ;-) I worked on my "voice" by reading her books!"
[bookcover:On Oakham Mount: A Pride & Prejudice Variation|..."

Thank you for the compliment! They say you can't judge a book by the cover, but I disagree. If an indie author pays attention to the cover design, it bodes well for the effort she made in writing a quality book and signals her taste to the reader. After several disappointments I wrote a book that I would want to read myself! My motto is "What would Jane write?" and my vow is to never take the readers time for granted. I hope the feedback I get from readers validates my efforts!

I've bookmarked the JA T. but I still think it's funny! Yes, I hate it when a word jumps out at me. I've come across references to Freudian themes that are obviously not period. Most online Thesaurus have word origins and usage, but I can see testing it from time to time with the JA Thesaurus. I don't write in Word but would never use its references anyway.

I think the most challenging thing about writing like Austen is the semi-omniscient narrator/Elizabeth POV. It's not frequently used these days but was a very typical style in the 19th century. If you read closely there are some moments that a modern editor might call head-hopping -- probably more head-visiting because they are just momentary shifts rather than totally jumping around. It's a more removed, less emotional/psychological style than modern readers prefer and I don't believe it translates to the screen very well either. I really enjoyed and learned a lot from reading this blog http://spontaneousderivation.com/2012... and I think other writers might gain some insight from it.


message 26: by Suzan (new)

Suzan Lauder (suzan_lauder) | 14 comments Sophia wrote: "Suzan wrote: "Sophia wrote: "Wow! I had no idea there was a Write like Austen site. Is that cheating? ;-) I worked on my "voice" by reading her books!"
[bookcover:On Oakham Mount: A Pride & Prejud..."


I totally agree with your cover comments. These days, many covers make me roll my eyes--from that guy in the modern tuxedo with a 90's blow-dried haircut and salon tan to the simple computer-generated animated people with their smooth, spherical heads that make them look like bad video game characters--for Regency! A good cover tells me the author cared, and I can expect something polished on the inside, too.

As for the article, some authors defend head-hopping more or less every second paragraph in their third person multiple (whether omniscient or limited) POV novel by saying, "Austen did it." That's not quite true. P&P was predominantly a single omniscient narrator with free indirect style, and at times, the narrative looks almost like third person, limited. That's why we relate so well to Elizabeth Bennet. Though I agree Austen's head-hopping consists of small, infrequent shifts once or twice a chapter at most, they come without clear warning, and they're disruptive. We're tossed about with changes in whose perspective we're hearing and, several times, it's not clear who's thinking what!

I just read a book that used a mash-up of non-character ON and third person limited, multiple POV, and the head-hopping was so frequent, I found it difficult to follow. Self-editing for POV consistency and flow is no more complex than for grammar or punctuation. POV changes should take place only at scene breaks or chapters, and the new storyteller should be named right away. This isn't a fixed rule, nor is it simply my opinion, but advice consistent with multiple writing articles, textbooks, and feedback from industry professionals.

With head-hopping, the reader becomes uncertain who's telling the story or which opinion they're hearing, which hampers their understanding of the development/resolution of conflict. And if you aren't writing for the reader's enjoyment, then what are you writing for?

I know, preaching to the choir.


message 27: by Ron (new)

Ron Stoltz | 1 comments I don't know if you will find this interesting, but I wrote a modern retelling of Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice featuring artists competing for a prestigious scholarship, called Thompson Lake.

Here's the link on amazon.

https://www.amazon.com/Romance-Thomps...

-Part 1 of 3-
A modernization of Pride and Prejudice, set in art school in Midwest America.
Mr. Darcy is now Mr. Davis, a former lawyer who has forsaken his rich and comfortable life defending criminals in pursuit of truth in art. Elizabeth Bennet is now Lizzie Graham, a clever and dazzlingly beautiful waitress desperate to leave her meaningless job by winning the school's full ride scholarship for painters.
Destined to fall in love, they see each other as adversaries in this incredible contest. But who will win?


message 28: by Suzan (new)

Suzan Lauder (suzan_lauder) | 14 comments Ron wrote: "I don't know if you will find this interesting, but I wrote a modern retelling of Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice featuring artists competing for a prestigious scholarship, called Thompson Lake.
..."

Ron, I suggest ensuring this is on Meredith Esparza's lists for JAFF, as they're the most comprehensive. I believe there are over 1000 now. Her web site is Austenesque Reviews.


message 29: by Suzan (new)

Suzan Lauder (suzan_lauder) | 14 comments My latest novel, Letter from Ramsgate by Suzan Lauder Letter from Ramsgate, was released last week. The premise is that Elizabeth Bennet meets Georgiana Darcy in Ramsgate prior to canon. It's rated for all audiences mature enough to enjoy Pride and Prejudice, but beware the dramatic tension in the middle!


message 30: by Lona (new)

Lona Manning | 89 comments Hello. I have just published my debut novel, "A Contrary Wind," a variation on Mansfield Park. It's available on Kindle through Amazon. I invite everyone to download the free sample on Amazon. http://amzn.to/2k9svxR. In my variation, Fanny runs away from Mansfield Park! There are some mature scenes.


message 31: by Lona (last edited Jan 07, 2018 03:52AM) (new)

Lona Manning | 89 comments This book is a retelling of Mansfield Park, part of a fairy tale series, just out. Charming: A fairy tale retelling of Mansfield Park by Nina Clare.


message 32: by Nina (new)

Nina Clare | 58 comments Lona wrote: "This book is a retelling of Mansfield Park, part of a fairy tale series, just out. Charming: A fairy tale retelling of Mansfield Park by Nina Clare."

Thanks, Lona! I don't like to promote myself in a discussion group, but there's also a free novella of my fairy tale retelling of Northanger Abbey available by signing up to my mailing list at www.ninaclarebooks.com.
I hope we're going to have another group read of an Austen novel soon - I really enjoyed our MP one last year!


message 33: by Jane (new)

Jane Austen | 11 comments There's a good list of some modern retellings on our website, but I can especially recommend Longbourn by Jo Baker: https://www.janeausten.co.uk/longbour...


message 34: by Mia (new)

Mia | 3 comments Ceri wrote: "I have a bookshelf for modern books based on Austen books if that helps: https://www.goodreads.com/review/list..."

Thank you, Ceri, for your shelf; I will definitely refer to it when looking for more of these Austen-based fiction. I was inspired to create my own Austen-based shelf: https://www.goodreads.com/review/list...

Really happy we have this community!


message 35: by Tracey (new)

Tracey (stewartry) | 44 comments I really enjoyed Georgiana Darcy's Diary: Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice Continued (just what it says on the tin: a continuation of P&P from Georgiana's POV). I think that's the only one I've actually liked. There's a Part 2 that wasn't as good. My review of 1; and of Book 2.

In contemporary riffs on Austen, I liked Jane Austen Ruined My Life (be warned - other people very much do not - here's my review of that one), and more recently I loved The Austen Escape (and again, my review.)


message 36: by QNPoohBear (new)

QNPoohBear | 582 comments My favorite modern retellings is the Jane Austen takes the South series by Mary Jane Hathaway. The themes are there but the retelling is a little less scene by scene which I like. I don't care for direct adaptations. It feels forced and doesn't always work for modern day people. The best one, in my opinion, is, Emma, Mr. Knightley, and Chili-Slaw Dogs, followed by Persuasion, Captain Wentworth and Cracklin' Cornbread. Persuasion has a twist that isn't in the original and gives it more of a modern feel.


message 37: by Melindam (new)

Melindam | 153 comments I like "Lions & Liquorice" (published under the title 'Vanity & Vexation' in the U.S.) which is a fun P&P adaptation with gender-swap.


message 38: by Melindam (new)

Melindam | 153 comments and Val McDermid's 'Northanger Abbey' is also great: the only book from the Austen Project I liked so far.


message 39: by Jane (new)

Jane Austen | 11 comments Adapting books to film can be a tough form of retelling, but adapting for the stage can also be highly challenging!

“Adapting a novel like Jane Austen’s Persuasion for the stage, from the earliest planning stages until the opening night, is a project that absorbs your days and nights for at least two years.”

https://www.janeausten.co.uk/jane-aus...


message 40: by Stephanie (new)

Stephanie Fowers (guitarbabe25) | 5 comments Hello everyone! My ebook Jane and Austen is on sale for 99 cents today on Amazon (6 day promotion). It's a fun summer read with a mishmash of characters from Jane Austen's books! I hope you enjoy it: https://www.amazon.com/Jane-Austen-St...


message 41: by Mary (new)

Mary Pagones Hello, all! I hope it's okay to post this here, but if you're looking for a fun YA retelling of Jane Austen--with some serious discussion of college, debt, and the state of education today--check out my Pride and Prejudice reboot, entitled Pride, Prejudice, and Personal Statements.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07JM7WJ58


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