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The Time Ships
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message 1: by Anna (new)

Anna Erishkigal (annaerishkigal) Greetings Space Opera Fans!

Have you ever wondered what happened to H.G.Well's Time Traveller after he went back to the past and snagged a copy of the bible? Stephen Baxter takes us back into the world of The Time Machine as the Traveller tries to navigate the time-paradox's he created as time fractures into countless possibilities.

The Time Ships by Stephen Baxter Stephen Baxter

"The highly-acclaimed sequel to H G Wells’s The Time Machine...

Written to celebrate the centenary of the publication of H G Wells’s classic story The Time Machine, Stephen Baxter’s stunning sequel is an outstanding work of imaginative fiction.

The Time Traveller has abandoned his charming and helpless Eloi friend Weena to the cannibal appetites of the Morlocks, the devolved race of future humans from whom he was forced to flee. He promptly embarks on a second journey to the year AD 802,701, pledged to rescue Weena. He never arrives! The future was changed by his presence… and will be changed again. Hurled towards infinity, the Traveller must resolve the paradoxes building around him in a dazzling temporal journey of discovery. He must achieve the impossible if Weena is to be saved..."


Okay ... who's reading The Time Ships? Shout it out in the discussion thread below, tell us what you think, and drop in links to your reviews. Remember ... be kind and use the SPOILER .html if you drop hints so it doesn't spoil the fun for somebody who isn't as far along as you are!


message 2: by Sarah (new)

Sarah I've never read The Time Machine. Should I read it first?


message 3: by Anna (new)

Anna Erishkigal (annaerishkigal) Sarah wrote: "I've never read The Time Machine. Should I read it first?"

It's a short book, available for FREE in all formats at Project Gutenberg: https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/35

Or if you want the quick & lazy catch-up, watch the movie. Unfortunately, all they have on YouTube is the 2002 remake (the 1960 original is truer to the book).


message 4: by Sarah (new)

Sarah K. Thanks!


message 5: by Pete (last edited Feb 01, 2015 12:13PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Pete Cruickshank | 26 comments Sarah wrote: "I've never read The Time Machine. Should I read it first?"

It will take you no time at all to read the original. It is brilliant for it's time (terrible pun). The Time Ships is one of my favourite books. It is so magical and epic. Some of the concepts in it are truly astounding. Simply put — You must read it.


message 6: by Sarah (new)

Sarah Hmm. I'll have to try it.


message 7: by Anna (new)

Anna Erishkigal (annaerishkigal) I like Stephen Baxter's work in general, so I'll probably like this. And H.G. Wells was one of the original 'steampunk' fathers, along with Jules Verne.


message 8: by Sarah (new)

Sarah I ordered a copy. Unfortunately my library doesn't have it so I had to spend real money! Shocking. This one is a maybe for me because of time availability.


message 9: by Anna (new)

Anna Erishkigal (annaerishkigal) The ebook edition is only $5.48, 649 pages, not bad for a big fat doorstopper by a legacy sci-fi author, the only problem is it's DRM-locked. Bummer... But you can pick up a used copy of the mass market paperback for $2.97 with free shipping. Think I'll grab it.

My husband and daughter are downstairs cheering ... the Patriots just won the Superbowl. :-P


message 10: by Jessica (new) - added it

Jessica  (jessical1961) Anna wrote: "The ebook edition is only $5.48, 649 pages, not bad for a big fat doorstopper by a legacy sci-fi author, the only problem is it's DRM-locked. Bummer... But you can pick up a used copy of the mass..."

What does DRM locked mean?


message 11: by Sarah (new)

Sarah Digital Rights Management. I'm sure Anna knows more but the only thing I know of its that you can't lend those.

I found a 'good' copy for $3.70 at my fave online used bookstore. I did hesitate over that slightly cheaper 'acceptable' copy.


message 12: by Jessica (new) - added it

Jessica  (jessical1961) Thanks for that info. I had seen DRM used before elsewhere, but forgot to ask. That would suck. Amazon Kindle version is $9.99. It's on my wish list but I won't be reading until the price come down to about half that. Maybe the local library has it or can get it.


message 13: by Sarah (new)

Sarah Thriftbooks.com had awesome used book prices. I use them to death.

I flat refuse to pay more than $10 for anything. I'm seeing a ridiculous amount of $12.99 and up. There would have to be far fewer costs with digital books and then you add DRM (although a lot of authors are starting to sell without) and it seems like digital books are a huge cash cow for them.


message 14: by Jessica (new) - added it

Jessica  (jessical1961) Seems that way to me too. There is no printing or shipping costs involved. Digital books take up no warehouse space. You don't have to pay someone to stock the shelves and straighten them up every night after closing. Seems the only costs involved would be for the disk storage space on the companies server and a little bit of bandwidth to download the book to the purchaser.

I think anything over $5.99 is just the publisher and distributor trying to maximize their profits at the expense of the reader.


message 15: by Anna (new)

Anna Erishkigal (annaerishkigal) DRM = Pain-in-the-Butt

It means you can't move it around between devices. I don't trust Amazon (or Adobe ... or anyone) to have that kind of access to my computer or devices, so if it's not DRM-free I won't buy it. I download to my desktop, and then I make a copy and save it using Calibre eBook Management software, and then I download it to my old-fashioned Nook Simple Touch that has no bells, whistles, or ways for Big Brother to get in and track my reading habits. It's spooky downloading books and seeing what other people have highlighted ... I wonder if they realize it does that ... tracks you and reports it back to Amazon? And Adobe is even WORSE ... they got nailed a few months ago tracking not just ebooks you opened using Adobe Digital Editions, but also scanning your non-Adobe ebook folders (Kindle, Calibre, etc) and reporting THAT information back to Adobe as well.

DRM - I won't buy


message 16: by Jessica (new) - added it

Jessica  (jessical1961) How do you tell if a book has DRM attached to it? I don't want to have to purchase a seperate book for each of my two Kindles plus my PC. Also, how do you download to your desktop? I just recently (like last week) started using Calibre and so far the only digital books I added to it are books downloaded from Gutenberg. I have several books from BookShout that I would love to get out of the cloud and onto my Kindle. That way I don't have to be online to read them.


message 17: by Pete (new) - rated it 5 stars

Pete Cruickshank | 26 comments Jeffrey wrote: "Anna wrote: "The ebook edition is only $5.48, 649 pages, not bad for a big fat doorstopper by a legacy sci-fi author, the only problem is it's DRM-locked. Bummer... But you can pick up a used cop..."

My copy's been read five times now by three different people, is very frayed and has sellotape to keep the front cover on, It shows it's been used and enjoyed.


message 18: by Betsy (new)

Betsy | 883 comments Mod
Jeffrey wrote: "How do you tell if a book has DRM attached to it? I don't want to have to purchase a seperate book for each of my two Kindles plus my PC. Also, how do you download to your desktop? I just recently ..."

If you buy a kindle book, you can read it on any kindle device or kindle app which is attached to your kindle account. You don't need separate copies.


message 19: by Jessica (new) - added it

Jessica  (jessical1961) Betsy wrote: "If you buy a kindle book, you can read it on any kindle device or kindle app which is attached to your kindle account. You don't need separate copies."

That's good to know! Glad to hear it. I guess the DRM means that I can't loan the book to someone else who has a kindle like I can some of the others.


message 20: by Sarah (new)

Sarah That's how I see it. It sounds like Anna is saying that you can't switch it from your Kindle to another device, like a Nook. I think. I only worry about the lending option.


message 21: by Anna (new)

Anna Erishkigal (annaerishkigal) To tell if a book has DRM on Amazon, go down to the 'PRODUCT DESCRIPTION' and look for the following verbiage:

Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited

That means the book DOES NOT have DRM and you can use Calibre to convert it and add it your other devices.

If it doesn't say that, then it's DRM locked.

B&N/Nook is always DRM-locked these days, so even though I own a Nook e-reader, I no longer buy from B&N.

KOBO has some books that are DRM-locked and others that aren't. I used to buy from them all the time, but then they moved to not saying whether it was DRM-free or not. Sometimes the publisher themselves (usually an indie author) will write in the product description This book is sold without DRM. But if you don't see it explicitly spelled out, then you should be wary. You might end up with a book you cannot read.

Nearly ALL books on Smashwords are DRM-free. They are my go-to source for books and I always check to see if a book is available THERE before I will buy it from Amazon. Smashwords is the most reader-friendly platform of all the distributors, but you have to know how to manually sideload your ebook onto your e-reader.

Calibre ... is your friend. I <3 Calibre!!!


message 22: by Jessica (new) - added it

Jessica  (jessical1961) I have bought 2 e-books from Smashwords and neither one would work on my Kindle. I could read in the Kindle app on my computer but not on my actual Kindle.


message 23: by Sarah (new)

Sarah They store some place other than the main page I think. I always have to Google to see how to find them.


message 24: by Anna (last edited Feb 04, 2015 09:20PM) (new)

Anna Erishkigal (annaerishkigal) People don't realize when they buy a Kindle that Amazon does everything in their power to lock you to their distribution platform to do all your buying. :-( But you -can- get around it. It just takes a few more steps.

Here's a tutorial: http://google.about.com/od/kindlefire...

That's why I won't buy a Kindle. We bought our globetrotting eldest daughter a Google Nexus 7 e-reader two years ago with the stern admonition not to buy all her ebooks from Amazon. Of course, she didn't listen (despite the fact we spent 4x more for a non-Kindle so she wouldn't have any problems). So when she crossed one European border one time too many, they wiped out her entire library, and she also discovered she couldn't use it when she came HOME because Amazon.IT is a different venue than Amazon.USA so it immediately disabled her access to get into her library. I told her 'we told you so.'

Try the tutorial. And don't believe Amazon sells that Kindle to you so cheap out of the kindness of their heart. It's their gateway drug to get people to ONLY shop for everything, from books to widgets to a flea collar for their cat, from them.


message 25: by Jennifer (new)

Jennifer Povey | 25 comments Grrr.

I hadn't realized B&N was forcing me to use DRM too. Unfortunately, I can't dismiss them as an outlet. (I'm barely tolerating it with Apple).

Kobo stopped *forcing* authors and publishers to use DRM some time ago.

I personally think it is unethical for distributors to determine this for publishers, but what can you do? (Other than send people to Smashwords first, of course).


message 26: by Anna (new)

Anna Erishkigal (annaerishkigal) B&N is the absolute worst! Even if an author/publisher specifies a title is to be sold without DRM, they still wrap it in their own clunky proprietary DRM. I gave up on buying ebooks from them a long time ago.

KOBO doesn't force you to use DRM, but they don't formally specify which books are DRM or not DRM, so unless it's a free ebook (i.e., if I get burned I can just go download it free someplace else) or one the publisher explicitly states is without DRM, I don't take the chance. Why throw money away on an ebook you can't read?

Amazon, at least, spells out 'simultaneous device usage' when it's DRM-free...

GooglePlay -also- spells it out in their 'additional information' section, which says 'this content is DRM-free.' I've been using GooglePlay a lot lately to buy my books and music.

iTunes ... it's another proprietary universe like Amazon, with all of the good and bad points. I don't have an iOS ereader, so I never buy from them.

I always check Smashwords first, and am so used to managing my ebook library via Calibre that it's no trouble at all. I can pull books on and off my e-reader with ease so I don't max out its memory. Once you get into the habit it becomes effortless.


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