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Archive 08-19 GR Discussions > The Light between Oceans: Part 1

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message 1: by Irene (new)

Irene  (irene918) | 1016 comments Part 1-


message 2: by Irene (last edited Jan 26, 2015 08:48PM) (new)

Irene  (irene918) | 1016 comments How is the title related to the plot? Why do you think the author selected this title?


message 3: by Jayme (new)

Jayme (jaymetheghostreader) | 4852 comments I thought it had to do with World War I. The lighthouses are supposed to be beacons for ships to find land. I guess it is a beacon of light between Australia and the rest of the world during WWI. Just what I thought.


message 4: by Kirsten (new)

Kirsten Feldman (goodreadscomkirsten_feldman) I think the title draws attention to the precarious nature of these two (then three) people existing on this rock in the middle of the elements. I adore the cover The Light Between Oceans


message 5: by Jayme (new)

Jayme (jaymetheghostreader) | 4852 comments I am actually passed part 1 now.


message 6: by Sue (last edited Feb 02, 2015 01:34PM) (new)

Sue Irene wrote: "How is the title related to the plot? Why do you think the author selected this title?"

I think the author has been clever in selecting the title for the duality of its meaning the literal and metaphorical.

Obviously with the literal meaning, the book is set on Janus island which hosts a lighthouse and the lighthouse lights the way in the ocean for the confirmation of location, re-orientate the lost or act as a guiding light.

For me the metaphorical meaning is that there is a clear way (e.g truth, love and forgiveness) through ambiguity.


message 7: by Irene (new)

Irene  (irene918) | 1016 comments Im stuck on part one. I had to read chapters 1, 2 & 3 over 4 times to understand it. I'm not sure if it because of the era.


message 8: by Jayme (new)

Jayme (jaymetheghostreader) | 4852 comments Wow, I didn't have that much trouble with it. The beginning was a little confusing at times. I got through part one in two days. What were you confused on?


message 9: by Sue (last edited Feb 03, 2015 02:23AM) (new)

Sue Irene wrote: "Im stuck on part one. I had to read chapters 1, 2 & 3 over 4 times to understand it. I'm not sure if it because of the era."

I wonder have you read the synopsis of the book to give you the bear outline of the story. I know that sometimes if I have not read the synopis, I cannot figure out what the story is about?


message 10: by Irene (new)

Irene  (irene918) | 1016 comments I think it is the words and the unfamiliar historical accounts and towns.


message 11: by Irene (new)

Irene  (irene918) | 1016 comments Thank you for sharing my concern and offering solutions.


message 12: by Rebecca (last edited Feb 01, 2015 02:04PM) (new)

Rebecca I think there is time flashback between Tom's current life and his war time. Irene I found this link it might help you from chapter to chapter. There is also a lot going on with Tom' getting the job at Janus. I also found it confusing the first time I started my reading. I think after Part 1 it will get better.

Warining: This link contains spoilers for each chapter.

http://www.bookrags.com/studyguide-th...


message 13: by Irene (new)

Irene  (irene918) | 1016 comments The first sentence in Chapter 3, the store boat for the light stations , store boat? Ok I finally figured out that it is the boat to drop him off at the lighthouse. Light station? Oh lighthouse. Yes, i finally realized there was a flashback but I gave up on trying to understand why he had a gun as a child? I love challenges.


message 14: by Irene (last edited Feb 01, 2015 04:20PM) (new)

Irene  (irene918) | 1016 comments Skippered the vessel for donkey's years, what does donkey's years mean. I'll have to Google it. It's British slang for a long time.


message 15: by Irene (new)

Irene  (irene918) | 1016 comments Brass monkey weather means bitter cold, thanks to Google


message 16: by Irene (new)

Irene  (irene918) | 1016 comments Long in the tooth, means old


message 17: by Irene (new)

Irene  (irene918) | 1016 comments Well, I am enjoying the story as I am learning new phrases and words. ;)


message 18: by Irene (new)

Irene  (irene918) | 1016 comments Quick smart= your hands move faster than the brain


message 19: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca I must of missed that. I didn't remember a part about a gun. I better go back and read it.


message 20: by Irene (new)

Irene  (irene918) | 1016 comments I wonder if there is no such thing as a comma splice in British English. "Lives gone, traces left."


message 21: by Irene (last edited Feb 01, 2015 08:04PM) (new)

Irene  (irene918) | 1016 comments Like Tom, I always say, leave the past in the past.

Isabel tells him you always carry your family with you and Tom replies that's a great pity translated from "More's the pity"

Why did he say that?


message 22: by Daniale (new)

Daniale Lynch | 148 comments Sue wrote: "Irene wrote: "How is the title related to the plot? Why do you think the author selected this title?"

I think the author has been clever in selecting the title for the duality of its meaning the l..."


I like your analysis, Sue. I agree, it's physically a light(house) between Oceans, a beacon of safety for ships. It's also metaphorically a beacon for Izzy and Tom--they are both dealing with their own PTSD and the incongruous nature of their own inner passion (and turmoil) and their outer worlds of duty and propriety.


message 23: by Daniale (new)

Daniale Lynch | 148 comments Irene wrote: "Like Tom, I always say, leave the past in the past.

Isabel tells him you always carry your family with you and Tom replies that's a great pity translated from "More's the pity"

Why did he ..."

Wow, that's an interesting line to isolate, Irene. I think it highlights the differences between Tom and Isabel. He uses the duty of daily life to move forward and ignore the past, and she carries her past with her. I think he is unable to deal with the ambiguity and uncertainty of his past--both with his biological family and his war brethren. He wishes that they could both just forge ahead and let the past stay where it is. It would be interesting to discuss the success of this idea later in the book.


message 24: by Jayme (new)

Jayme (jaymetheghostreader) | 4852 comments You can't always leave things in the past. Your past experiences make the person you are in the present.


message 25: by Jayme (new)

Jayme (jaymetheghostreader) | 4852 comments I finished the book.


message 26: by Irene (last edited Feb 02, 2015 06:42PM) (new)

Irene  (irene918) | 1016 comments The first paragraph in Ch6. really stood out for me. The use of personification and descriptive details of the island created strong rich imagery.

Is there a particular passage that stood out for you in part 1?


message 27: by Irene (last edited Feb 02, 2015 05:04PM) (new)

Irene  (irene918) | 1016 comments Kirsten wrote: "I think the title draws attention to the precarious nature of these two (then three) people existing on this rock in the middle of the elements. I adore the cover [book:The Light Between Oceans|131..."

The cover is beautiful. I love lighthouses. I actually made a lighthouse rug from a hook and latch kit.


message 28: by Irene (new)

Irene  (irene918) | 1016 comments Rebecca wrote: "I think there is time flashback between Tom's current life and his war time. Irene I found this link it might help you from chapter to chapter. There is also a lot going on with Tom' getting the jo..."

Thank you, great website.


message 29: by Irene (last edited Feb 02, 2015 05:07PM) (new)

Irene  (irene918) | 1016 comments Jayme(the ghost reader) wrote: "I finished the book."

Wow! That's fabulous. I have friends that can read a book in one day, but I start to drift.


message 30: by Irene (new)

Irene  (irene918) | 1016 comments Jayme(the ghost reader) wrote: "You can't always leave things in the past. Your past experiences make the person you are in the present."

True


message 31: by Irene (new)

Irene  (irene918) | 1016 comments Rebecca wrote: "I must of missed that. I didn't remember a part about a gun.

It's in ch1, paragraph 8.



message 32: by Irene (new)

Irene  (irene918) | 1016 comments Daniale wrote: "Sue wrote: "Irene wrote: "How is the title related to the plot? Why do you think the author selected this title?"

I think the author has been clever in selecting the title for the duality of its m..."


Profounding.


message 33: by Irene (new)

Irene  (irene918) | 1016 comments Would you consider raising a child on Janus a good idea?


message 34: by Irene (last edited Feb 02, 2015 06:46PM) (new)

Irene  (irene918) | 1016 comments Jayme(the ghost reader) wrote: "You can't always leave things in the past. Your past experiences make the person you are in the present."

I understand the reason he doesn't want to mingle with his past. I know people who live in the past and never moves on from it. It's like they are trapped. He has moved from it and doesn't want to be reminded of it.


message 35: by Irene (new)

Irene  (irene918) | 1016 comments What do you think of each character, Izzy and Tom? What characteristic traits do each hold?


message 36: by Sue (last edited Feb 03, 2015 02:42AM) (new)

Sue Irene wrote: "The first paragraph in Ch6. really stood out for me. The use of personification and descriptive details of the island created strong rich imagery.

Is there a particular passage that stood out for..."


I agree that passage is a memmorable and me with my limited imagination can get a feel for Janus.

The paragraph that stood out for me 'A bit of brass does not make anyone a hero'.....'Most of the blokes who really deserve the medals aren't around any more'.

I think they are quite raw and stark statements. Tom has obviously done something significant to warrant his 'bit of brass' but he his dismissive and down plays it, and just wants to put it behind him. It seems Tom feels less of a hero for survived the war and feels the ultimate heroes are the one who paid for with their lives.

I think Tom is quite traumatized by the war that he took part in as anyone would be.


message 37: by Sue (last edited Feb 03, 2015 02:55AM) (new)

Sue Irene wrote: "Rebecca wrote: "I must of missed that. I didn't remember a part about a gun.

It's in ch1, paragraph 8."


The part with the gun he has a child is part of a nightmare that mixed with scenes from the war.


message 38: by Sue (last edited Feb 03, 2015 02:59AM) (new)

Sue Irene wrote: "Would you consider raising a child on Janus a good idea?"

Personally probably not, but that does not mean to say couples who live in these such places should not rear children there.

It would certainly be a unique experience as a child being reared on Janus Rock and would certainly be a conversation piece as an adult. My partner was brought up on a farm and that is always curious to me a city girl and now that he is a city boy.

My wariness about Janus Rock would be the isolation, the worry about whether the child would mix socially with other people/children, education, the dangers from the water, rocks, the wild life etc and the delay it would take if urgent medical help was required. Although these dangers could also occur inland but there is readily available help.

To be honest after Izabel had had 2 miscarriages I think should have had her 3rd confinement inland, it probably would not have ultimately made any difference but I am sure the grief over losing her child is further exacerbated by the starkness and rawness of Janus Rock.


message 39: by Irene (new)

Irene  (irene918) | 1016 comments I agree Sue. Tom doesn't feel worthy of the medal. He may almost feel guilty he survived.
I think anyone who fights in a war is a hero.


message 40: by Irene (last edited Feb 03, 2015 08:36PM) (new)

Irene  (irene918) | 1016 comments Sue wrote:The part with the gun he has a child is part of a nightmare that mixed with..."

Oh, ok. Thank you for clarifying it. I reread it a few times.

To dream that you are a small child again suggests that you are feeling the burdens of adulthood. You are trying to escape from your daily responsibility and are looking for someone else to shield, protect and care for you.

To dream that you lose a child represents losing hope. It may also suggest that a project is not working out as you had wanted it to.


Which description above describes Tom?


message 41: by Kirsten (new)

Kirsten Feldman (goodreadscomkirsten_feldman) Irene wrote: "What do you think of each character, Izzy and Tom? What characteristic traits do each hold?"

I think of the island itself as the third character in this book The Light Between Oceans. Janus impacts most every action, emotion, and moment of the day for these two. Their lives would be different in every way if they lived and worked elsewhere.


message 42: by Jayme (new)

Jayme (jaymetheghostreader) | 4852 comments Irene wrote: "Jayme(the ghost reader) wrote: "You can't always leave things in the past. Your past experiences make the person you are in the present."

I understand the reason he doesn't want to mingle with..."


I think you have to be able to accept your past and not dwell on past events.


message 43: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca I think like Jamie. By learning to accept your past you can move on. Its okay to stay stuck in the past but I think it limits people.


message 44: by Irene (new)

Irene  (irene918) | 1016 comments How do you like the story so far?


message 45: by Maureen (new)

Maureen (meg9000) | 84 comments The story is ok so far, but it moves so fast... There is so much more that could be said or developed. I like the character of Tom. He holds his pain close, but thinks deeply about life. He's found a way to make himself whole through Izzie. She is pretty young, more impulsive than Tom, and not as introspective and thoughtful.

As we know from the preface, she's going to get them both in trouble with something Tom would never do if he didn't love her and want so badly to make her happy. I always dread the parts where the characters get themselves in trouble. So I'm dreading Part 2. But I'm enjoying he book and the setting and the premise.


message 46: by Sheila , Supporting Chick (new)

Sheila  | 3485 comments Mod
I've just finished part one. I think I am going to enjoy the story. I am interested to see where it goes. I am liking the language, the scenery, the story that is slowly building. I like Tom and Izzy's relationship. I find the life living on the island fascinating. I love how they each have their own approach to it. The loss of Izzy's baby was very sad, but now apparently, from the first chapter, they will find a baby washed ashore in a boat. I wonder where this will go, how they will each deal with this.


message 47: by Jennifer W (new)

Jennifer W | 2175 comments I've just barely started, finished chapter 1 last night. I think I'll like it, but I read a of books set around WWI and WWII and I'm kind of getting burnt out on them. I think in addition to this, I'll pick up something completely different from the library when I go today.


message 48: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca I think the comments are pretty much the same things I am enjoying. The more I read the more I love that the eeriness of Janus and the lighthouse life unfold and that it parallels with Tom and Izzy.

I understand what you are saying Jennifer. I think every genre goes through popularity trends. I think that the WW story is mixed enough with other thing going on in the story that it should prove to be interesting, or at least I hope so.

Maureen I think your posts are so concise yet spot on. I also felt the dread, but also the curiosity of reading part 2. Its so looming at the end of part 1.


message 49: by Daniale (new)

Daniale Lynch | 148 comments I love that you described Janus as eery; I felt the same way! It's liberating for Izzy, and grounding for Tom, but it's so stark, isolated, and turbulent, that I found it to be almost another character in the novel.


message 50: by Irene (new)

Irene  (irene918) | 1016 comments Very interesting comments from each of you. I agree with your comments about how Janus plays a role in developing the two characters. I also am enjoying the various grammatical usage and language. The story is flowing for me. I had a hard time getting started but onceI I passed the hump of the introduction it's an easy and interesting read.


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