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Europe and the Faith
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Europe and the Faith - Oct 2020 > 1. Along the Way

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message 1: by John (new)

John Seymour | 1916 comments Mod
1. Use this thread to discuss any thoughts or insights you may have while reading the book, especially those that don't really fit any other thread.


message 2: by Mariangel (last edited Oct 07, 2020 04:28PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Mariangel | 566 comments I just finished chapter 4 and I am liking it very much.
Belloc explains things very clearly. I like how he put in perspective how close people living in the year 200 were (and felt) with respect to the Apostles.


Fonch | 1334 comments I have just concluded the book and soon i Will start to post comments about Mari Ángel chapter This part is really imoortant because Belloc praised and recomended the oral tradition and not only the documents. It is really Interesting because the christianity started as an oral tradition he conected Tertulian with Saint Justin and with Saint Ignatius that he was a disciple of Saint John. It is another chapter but the case of Ferreolus is interested to prove that not only you must Read the writings for being Christian and you have simpatheties you need something more for being Christian.


Mariangel | 566 comments I found Chapter 5 less interesting and a bit repetitive.


Fonch | 1334 comments Oh It is really curious Mariangel because when i Read this book i was doing my degree in History and i had not a lot information that It had happened to England between the quit of the Romans until the arrival of Saint Agustine of Canterbory all It was mistful and Dark and thanks to Hilaire Belloc i could rebuild that It happened in England during This periods thanks to him i knew to Saint Gildas before It was employed by the protestant Celtic writers about This topic i wrote when i wrote my review of the The Mailoc's voyage the secret book of Ronan the Hermit where i commented the risk of the novels to write about the celts to come back to the paganism antichristian or to create a conflict between the Catholic church and the Celtic Church being much better the second. It is truth that Belloc did not of Celtic monasteries but he assisted me to rebuild the period and to know the figure of Saint German very different to the Antoine Fuqua's novel King Arthur plenty of hate to the Catholic religion. He says that we must look for information in Saint Gildas about the saxons and Saint Bede despite being written several centuries later that the events. I did not remember that Cerdic one of the saxon leaders was a Celtic name.


Mariangel | 566 comments Just finished. My review is here:

https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...


Fonch | 1334 comments It is an excellent review Mariángel i totally agree with you. It is a pity that It was not translated to spanish the book how the Reformation happened and characters of Reformation. Try to tell the truth of the Reformation against the Whig historiography was one of the most important labor of Hilaire Belloc. It would be good to rescue the figure of Belloc, Dawson and Hugh Ross Williamson. Robert Hugh Benson did a similar work with their novels and Maurice Baring with Robert Peckham.


message 8: by Jill (new)

Jill A. | 709 comments What can he possibly mean by saying (in ch. 6) there's nothing more valuable to true history than legend?
Or that Catholicism is most alive in arms (ch. 9)? Surely it's legitimate to be a Catholic pacifist!


Mariangel | 566 comments Jill, I thought of you when I read that in ch. 9.

About legends, I think he means that you can gain historical insights about the time and people who developed those legends, in ways you wouldn't from the usual chronicles.


Manuel Alfonseca | 1553 comments Mod
Jill wrote: "What can he possibly mean by saying (in ch. 6) there's nothing more valuable to true history than legend?
Or that Catholicism is most alive in arms (ch. 9)? Surely it's legitimate to be a Catholic pacifist!"


In 1940, C.S. Lewis wrote a paper titled "Why I am not a pacifist" (see a comment here: https://www.cslewis.com/why-im-not-a-...). Try to put yourself in his place and time, and consider whether you'd have advised France and Britain to try to keep peace by letting Hitler conquer Poland without declaring war.

Sometimes supporting war is nothing but self-preservation.


Fonch | 1334 comments I want to remember that exists a concept of fair war defended by Saint Thomas Aquinas, sometimes you must fight in case that It happens the War you must fight for a fair war withouh cruelty and without hate.


Mariangel | 566 comments Manuel wrote: "Try to put yourself in his place and time, and consider whether you'd have advised France and Britain to try to keep peace by letting Hitler conquer Poland without declaring war."

Even the notorious pacifist Bertrand Russell said war was necessary to defeat Hitler.


Fonch | 1334 comments If we Read to Paul Johnson in Intellectuals he said that he is in favor in employing the atomic bombs against the Soviet Unión. But i am going to quote my friend Juan Manuel de Prada sometimes we confuse peace with Irenism "The Peace It is not the absence of violence the Peace is the come back the Justice".


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