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Writer's Block Café

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message 1: by Glenda (new)

Glenda Reynolds (glendareynolds) | 1021 comments Mod
Goodreads Writers Block Cafe

This post is not strictly for writing. Feel free to discuss anything to unwind, get inspired, share common interests, your favorite authors or books, and even share your favorite YouTube videos. Please keep the conversations light (no heated debates). Also please be mindful and keep it PG 13 and if promoting, please use the Promotional post. Thank you!


message 2: by S. (new)

S. Willett (swillett) | 96 comments I have noticed that many writers are also creative in other ways, too. Almost every afternoon, you will find me in my basement studio cutting, filing, taping, and soldering glass.


message 3: by Glenda (last edited Sep 28, 2020 03:34PM) (new)

Glenda Reynolds (glendareynolds) | 1021 comments Mod
S. wrote: "I have noticed that many writers are also creative in other ways, too. Almost every afternoon, you will find me in my basement studio cutting, filing, taping, and soldering glass."

As in stained glass? Do you have a business on the side?

My husband and I use to live in Havre de Grace, Maryland, a really old city on the Chesapeake Bay North East of Baltimore. We lived there for five years. The city was incorporated in 1785. There is the Concord lighthouse there that we enjoyed going to when we took walks to the promenade along the water. https://www.pinterest.com/pin/2322237...
Anyway what I'm getting at, you can imagine that some of the houses are very old. They have many Victorian style houses. This web site is an example of the housing there; scroll down to see stained glass windows.
https://www.oldhousedreams.com/2011/0...


message 4: by Mirta (new)

Mirta Oliva (mirtaoliva) | 362 comments Since I was a child, I had an interest in old chiming clocks. In the late 1970s, I saw an ad in the Wall Street Journal about a clock collection for sale. For $100.00 one could order one old piece, sight unseen, and hope for the best. I loved my old wall clock and soon it was chiming in the dining room wall. About three days later, a loud noise woke us up. A search of the house did not reveal anything out of order until my eyes rested on the clock. It was leaning to the right, the result of a broken spring. This sad event did not spoil my interest and soon I had acquired two more clocks from a collector, in perfect condition-- to be followed by others of USA or foreign origin.
As I continued pursuing my banking career, I spent some of my free time buying and restoring various antiques including writing instruments, all the while hoping to make this my business after retirement. And, yes, earlier than planned, I did just that by opening Antiques are Forever. If I liked a clock or pen in need of repairs, I bought them which led to my dedicating a room for antiques restoration. I bought many books and materials and loved to see a “dead” clock or pen working again. This is a condensed version of what transpired and the joys of discovery and restoration of once beautiful pieces. Nothing beats creation—the foundation of any productive economy.


message 5: by TERRY (new)

TERRY | 596 comments Mod
Mirta, I bought a German wall clock when I was stationed there in the 60's. I was told it was made between 1805 - 1815. I think it is called a Grandmother clock. It is on my wall and in full working condition. Any idea what it is worth? I was thinking of selling it to a local antique store, hoping to get about $300.


message 6: by Mirta (new)

Mirta Oliva (mirtaoliva) | 362 comments Terry, I hope I can help you to find the approximate value of your German clock. Too many things have happened since I closed shop, i.e., antiques are being replaced for the most part for new everything—more prevalent in some USA states than others. With that in mind, it follows that prices have also dropped for most items. While the rare collectibles tend to hold their values depending on condition, mass-produced items such as some clocks are not doing as well. Then, again, demand commands. Now, about your clock. You think it is a grandmother clock, meaning it is a floor model smaller in size than the grandfather one. While the latter one is taller, either model came in different sizes—some larger ones do not fit the ceiling height of some homes. In the then young America, clocks were mass-produced with cheaper materials than some foreign brands but at very low, competitive prices (refer to the old Sears catalogue—early 1900s); conversely, the centuries-old French clocks had elaborate bronze cases, barrels and fittings. And the movements received medals for their quality. Other countries also manufactured beautiful, expensive mantel, wall or floor clocks. There is more to be said about antique clocks but now you have an idea of where I am coming from. Since books are no longer reliable for prices, I would suggest that you start with a “generic” internet search of your clock, for example, “Images of antique German grandmother (or grandfather) clocks.” While you will see quite a few grandmother/grandfather clocks, they will include wall clocks which may not be what you are looking for (If it hangs "on your wall," then it is a wall clock; if it stands against the wall and it is the smaller size, it may be a grandmother clock). Also, trying more than one browser will yield different picture samples for you to compare to yours. When you have a better idea of what type of clock you have, use the description to start a new search in EBay. There they have plenty of choices and most have a good description as to type of wood, veneers, brass fittings, type of dials, condition (from a non-working movement or chimes to minor repairs needed to case and/or movements).


message 7: by F.F. (new)

F.F. Burwick | 171 comments I had some basis as I was trying to say in the October story thread for what was inspiring my submission, there are things I have seen online. I think of showing something of that, it still would suggest our involvement for betterment. I would just want to know, if I can show it, whether it is better here than in the October story thread.


message 8: by Glenda (new)

Glenda Reynolds (glendareynolds) | 1021 comments Mod
F.F. wrote: "I had some basis as I was trying to say in the October story thread for what was inspiring my submission, there are things I have seen online. I think of showing something of that, it still would s..."
I was wondering at first if you meant the short story you submitted for September (not October); I wasn't sure. If you want to discuss thoughts along either themes, this is the place to do it - the goings on of "protesters" or insurrectionists, things of interest, etc.


message 9: by F.F. (new)

F.F. Burwick | 171 comments Right, I meant where I submitted the story, which was the September thread. My mind is really already on an October submission. I will get a link with info that was, or is, inspiring, to show here.


message 10: by F.F. (new)

F.F. Burwick | 171 comments Information like what is shown through this video gives me perspective that there are urgent choices we are facing, we could choose for things to not go so badly, but it is really possible for things to worsen in such a way that seeing that is inspiring me to write some things in a manner that there can be warning in it to choose ways to not approach what is depicted.
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/videos...


message 11: by Glenda (new)

Glenda Reynolds (glendareynolds) | 1021 comments Mod
Hopefully we have seen the last hurricane for the year. The heat and humidity is pulled up from the Gulf of Mexico over the Panhandle even though we are in the last month of October. Even at 6 a.m. this morning, it felt like a mid summer day when I opened the garage. :(

I have sent out a broadcast to the group about who would like to host for the quarters next year. I can do the first quarter. Anyone up for the other 3? Time to walk to the mailbox, fix a concoction for dinner, and watch The Blacklist bluerays. And the cycle will start again tomorrow. Hope everyone is doing ok.


message 12: by TERRY (new)

TERRY | 596 comments Mod
Here are five writing rules you may want to consider breaking …
Five writing rules you can break
1. Never end a sentence with a preposition

While you should still avoid ending a sentence with a preposition, if you must do linguistic gymnastics in order to do it, it’s not worth it.

In the English language, we use prepositions at the end of the sentence all the time—it’s a perfectly natural construction. In fact, efforts to move that pesky preposition can sometimes leave said sentence sounding stiff, awkward, and overly formal. For example, “Who is he going to the dance with?” sounds much more natural than “With whom is he going to the dance?”

You don’t want to add unnecessary prepositions, such as “Where are you going to?” when “Where are you going?” will do just fine. But ending with one on occasion is perfectly acceptable and even preferred in some cases.
2. “They” is not a singular pronoun

They is actually both a singular and plural pronoun, and it has been for centuries. Lexicographers have determined that as far back as the 1300s, they and its related forms have been used to refer to an indefinite referent—that is, an unspecified, unknown person. Using they acknowledges the gender or sex identity of a person or people isn’t known.

Today, they is breaking ground as the preferred choice to refer to a specific person who is nonbinary—or doesn’t identify with the binary genders of female and male to describe themselves—because they is not explicitly gendered. For example, you may say, “My child won the race. They make me so proud.”

Our entry for they now devotes a separate definition for each of the distinct uses as part of our biggest dictionary update ever at Dictionary.com.
3. Only write in full sentences

While full sentences should make up the majority of your writing, you don’t always need a subject and a verb to get a point across. Yes to fragments! Fragments can add a powerful punch or help the cadence of a piece flow.

Worried about breaking this rule? No problem. If you’re only using a fragment or two for effect and emphasis, it’s a perfectly acceptable writing technique.
4. Don’t split infinitives

Split infinitives aren’t nearly as scary as they’re made out to be. In most cases, you want to keep to and the accompanying verb together instead of placing an adverb between them. In some cases splitting them can change the meaning of your sentences. For example, if you say, “I really want to dance” it means you want to dance. Whereas if you say, “I want to really dance,” it implies you want to dance more intensely. (Don’t we all, don’t we all … )

A lot of these rules that we’re taught about writing—such as this one, and the rule against prepositions at the end of sentences—date back to a few centuries ago, when some stuffy grammarians decreed English should be more like the Latin, which they thought was a perfect language. As a result, they imposed rules that are native to Latin on English, but they aren’t native to English. For example, in Latin, an infinitive is one word (e.g., saltāre, “to dance”); in English it’s two (to dance), so it’s natural that we’d insert a word between them from time to time.
5. Don’t start sentences with conjunctions

Starting a sentence with a conjunction, such as and, or, nor, so, or but, is often the most natural-sounding way to go. Doing so can add emphasis and can help you avoid run-on sentences.

But, what about what your English teacher told you? Don’t worry too much about that. Many grammarians call this rule a superstition. According to the Chicago Manual of Style:

“There is a widespread belief—one with no historical or grammatical foundation—that it is an error to begin a sentence with a conjunction such as and, but or so. In fact, a substantial percentage (often as many as 10 percent) of the sentences in first-rate writing begin with conjunctions. It has been so for centuries, and even the most conservative grammarians have followed this practice.”


message 13: by Glenda (new)

Glenda Reynolds (glendareynolds) | 1021 comments Mod
Interesting. I have been practicing using conjunctions at the beginning of sentences for sometime, knowing this breaks the rule. It does add emphasis. I try to keep the infinitive together though most of the time. It has bothered me for sometime when a person asks the question, "Are you coming with?" In my mind I say, " Me, you idiot! "


message 14: by TERRY (new)

TERRY | 596 comments Mod
Use 'A Lot' Rather Than 'Alot'

A lot is a common phrase formed by combining the indefinite article a with the noun lot (“a considerable quantity or extent”).

Specifically, it can be used adverbially to mean "by a great degree" or "frequently" (“Her current apartment is a lot nicer than her last one”; “he goes swimming a lot during the summer”) or as a noun phrase meaning "a great amount" (“We had a lot of fun at the party”; “There were a lot of people at the beach”).

Sometimes you will see the article run together with lot to form alot, but most usage experts would consider this an error. The a is an indefinite article that functions just as it does in “I bought a dozen roses,” and should not be considered part of the noun itself.

In fact, lot can be modified with a word (such as whole) that separates it from the article, as in “They got into a whole lot of trouble.”

Lot is also found in a plural form not introduced by any article, as in “a painting with lots of color” or “Lots of people eat at that restaurant.” Such use tends to be found in less formal writing.
'A Lot' vs. 'Allot'

Adding to the confusion is that there is also a verb allot, meaning “to assign as a share or portion, or to distribute by lot or as if by lot.”

The budget plan also focuses on education. It sets aside $231.5 million to cover a pay raise of $3,000 for more than 52,000 teachers in South Carolina. It also allots $13.8 million for additional teacher recruitment and retention.
— Jason Raven, WIStv.com, 13 Jan. 2020

Finally, there is a classic trivia quiz, with chances to spin the prize wheel for a random number of points per question. Pap says there are more games, but not all can fit into the time allotted.
— Kalyn Over, The Charleston Post and Courier, 17 Jan. 2020

They ended up in Uganda, in the enormous Nakivale refugee settlement. They slept on the ground. Each person was allotted one bottle of oil, 1 pound of corn, 1 pound of beans per month. Those allotments weren’t enough to survive on.
— Lisa Gray, The Houston Chronicle, 11 Jan. 2020

One way to keep these words straight might be to remember that the verb is close in meaning to allocate, which also has two L’s, while the noun phrase consisting of the greater number of words (that is, two) applies to the large amount of something.

The rapper born Anthony Ray, meanwhile, spells his stage name as Sir Mix-a-Lot.


message 15: by TERRY (new)

TERRY | 596 comments Mod
I have been thinking about "rules" for some time now. We were taught dinner table etiquette growing up: Put one hand in your lap. Don't rest your elbow on the table: Sit up straight and don't bend down to the plate, etc, etc, etc. There are rules for plate, water glass, forks, spoon and knife placement. Someone made those rules for the rest of us, peons, to follow. Same with writing rules.


TERRY wrote: "Here are five writing rules you may want to consider breaking …
Five writing rules you can break
1. Never end a sentence with a preposition

While you should still avoid ending a sentence with a p..."



message 16: by Glenda (new)

Glenda Reynolds (glendareynolds) | 1021 comments Mod
So I wonder how everyone spent New Year's Day 2021. I started taking Medicare calls here at home on my shift at 7 a.m. I took one call in 2 hours. It was the same for other people in my "group"; we were texting each other by way of Microsoft Teams. Finally my supervisor said we were given Approved Time Off. We were able to be off our schedule for the day. I did a 4-bean chili in my slow cooker crock pot then I read Midnight Sun (Twilight series) ebook until I fell asleep for 2 hours. It was the perfect rainy weather for this.


message 17: by TERRY (new)

TERRY | 596 comments Mod
I got to sleep in until almost 7 AM because Roxy didn't want to go out in the rain. Filet steak for lunch, then football on TV in the afternoon.


message 18: by Glenda (last edited Jan 03, 2021 11:33AM) (new)

Glenda Reynolds (glendareynolds) | 1021 comments Mod
TERRY wrote: "I got to sleep in until almost 7 AM because Roxy didn't want to go out in the rain. Filet steak for lunch, then football on TV in the afternoon."

I'm curious. What do you do when Roxy doesn't want to go out in the rain?

I've been buying these 20 lb. bags of mixed bird seed. I have a bird feeder hanging from my palm tree. I also put seed in a concrete statue of a cat that is sleeping with a hole where it's belly should be for the seed. Then I sprinkle seed on the patio itself below it. Fat pigeons and other small birds visit my yard every day. They have even been so bold as to walk up to my sliding glass door with their wings open and pounce against the glass if there is no seed out there. Well, I'm out of seed. I guess the cats will be pounding the glass to scare them away. :)


message 19: by TERRY (new)

TERRY | 596 comments Mod
She is pretty good about holding it. I have stood in the garage doorway while she finds a spot and we have, on occasion, gone for a walk with umbrella if it is not raining too hard. But if she hears rain pounding the roof in the morning, she doesn't bother waking me. I have taken in another dog, Lucy, because the neighbors are not taking care of her. I feed the deer and eight ducks corn.

Glenda wrote: "TERRY wrote: "I got to sleep in until almost 7 AM because Roxy didn't want to go out in the rain. Filet steak for lunch, then football on TV in the afternoon."

I'm curious. What do you do when Rox..."



message 20: by Glenda (new)

Glenda Reynolds (glendareynolds) | 1021 comments Mod
TERRY wrote: "...I have taken in another dog, Lucy, because the neighbors are not taking care of her. I feed the deer and eight ducks corn...."

Wow. I don't feel so bad now spending money on bird seed. A deer, 8 ducks, and 2 dogs. God bless you for having a big heart to feed and care for those animals.

I found a small inspirational clipping on a shelf at my other computer that I work from here at home. I thought I'd share it here:
"Rather than focusing on why you can't become an author, focus on:
*Writing with emotion (Poet Robert Frost said, "No tears in the writer, no tears in the reader.")
*Carving out the time to write every week
*Sharing your work with others - like a writer's group
*Finding a mentor who has been where you want to be..."


message 21: by TERRY (new)

TERRY | 596 comments Mod
How to punctuate quotation marks in writing
Using periods and commas with quotation marks

In American usage, periods and commas typically go inside of quotation marks. When you’re quoting someone’s exact words, introduce the quote with open quotation marks, and end the quote with a period or comma and closing quotation marks.



The teacher said, “Your essay is due on Monday.”
“I am so tired,” Mom said as she sat down on the couch.

It is common to begin quotes with a comma before the opening quotation mark; however, this is not required in all writing styles. The most important thing is to keep your writing consistent. If you’re splitting a quote into two separate parts, you’ll end the first section with a comma inside of the quotes and begin the second section with another comma inside the quotes: “The problem is,” Rachel said, “no one wants to listen to anyone else’s opinion.”


message 22: by Glenda (new)

Glenda Reynolds (glendareynolds) | 1021 comments Mod
TERRY wrote: "How to punctuate quotation marks in writing
Using periods and commas with quotation marks

If you’re splitting a quote into two separate parts, you’ll end the first section with a comma inside of the quotes and begin the second section with another comma inside the quotes: “The problem is,” Rachel said, “no one wants to listen to anyone else’s opinion.”


And notice that in the second section of the quote that the first word is NOT capitalized. :)


message 23: by Glenda (new)

Glenda Reynolds (glendareynolds) | 1021 comments Mod
F.F. wrote: "...it is really possible for things to worsen in such a way that seeing that is inspiring me to write some things in a manner that there can be warning in it to choose ways to not approach what is depicted...."

Fred, I agree. In the times that we are living with pandemic and political unrest, people can find things that we share in common and not continually show hatred through social media. Writing not only gives us an escape, but it also allows us to write with kernels of truth and warning. Hopefully people will take it to heart for good change.


message 24: by F.F. (new)

F.F. Burwick | 171 comments Thanks Glenda for letting me know you see that. Writing is a joy but it is not without using it as an opportunity to share things we see or know, for others to not miss who might miss it otherwise. I am not the only one with this approach to writing, I think many others who write and those who are writers do that. And such writers are needed. And we writing that way need others who read and see some of such things from that.


message 25: by Glenda (new)

Glenda Reynolds (glendareynolds) | 1021 comments Mod
I just spent a good amount of time in the kitchen making homemade potato-bean-bacon soup for the first time. I must say I did a good job. It will go well with a couple of slices of chicken alfredo pizza. I hope everyone is staying safe and warm. Even here in North Florida we're supposed to get down to around 34 degrees tonight. I have seen it colder than that here, but no snow or ice to contend with.


message 26: by TERRY (new)

TERRY | 596 comments Mod
I love cream of potato soup.


message 27: by Glenda (new)

Glenda Reynolds (glendareynolds) | 1021 comments Mod
TERRY wrote: "I love cream of potato soup."

I wish I could say the potato soup turned out well. I followed the recipe, and it turned out to be like a thick paste. But when I doctor it with more milk and veggies - walah! It is editable. :)

So while you're sitting in the Writer's Block Cafe, think about the next story you could be writing that includes angels or demons. In these dark days we live in, we need your stories of encouragement, how your angel(s) battled the forces of evil, saved people from accidents or suicide, and brought messages of hope.

https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/...

And I'll take my latte with vanilla-caramel creamer and whip cream on top.


message 28: by TERRY (new)

TERRY | 596 comments Mod
What Is An Oxford Comma And When Do You Use It?
In a list of three or more items, the last comma is called the Oxford comma (or the serial comma). For example, in He bought eggs, milk, and bread, there’s a comma between each item listed. The comma before and is the Oxford comma. Not all style guides agree on whether to use the Oxford comma.
https://www.thesaurus.com/e/grammar/d...


message 29: by Glenda (new)

Glenda Reynolds (glendareynolds) | 1021 comments Mod
TERRY wrote: "What Is An Oxford Comma And When Do You Use It? ..."

No, I didn't know that's what it is called. I do remember reading that the comma before the conjunctions "and", "or", "but" is optional though.

Too bad I can't order dinner at the Writer's Block Café. I need to scrounge up some dinner shortly.


message 30: by TERRY (new)

TERRY | 596 comments Mod
POEM BY TERRY TURNER


We walk through the woods enjoying the morning.
Me and my dog Roxy who follows behind.
When a blood curdling scream comes without warning.
Our hearts start pounding, unsure of our find.

The wind moves the leaves;
is that thunder I hear?
Maybe we should leave,
as a storm may be near.

Roxy's low bark and muffled growl,
ears pointed and alert, rigid she stands.
Her eyes pierce the shadows on the verge of a howl,
how she knows something's there, I don't understand.

Another scream follows same as the first;
then a snort and feet pounding in fear.
Should we run or not, to Roxy I curse,
the menace is ever so near.

A bobcat and deer come into view.
The poor deer's chest is scratched and bleeding,
we stand in place, what else can we do,
I fear for her life and my heart is speeding.

She is determined to fight and will not be beat.
Turning her back, I thought she would run,
but she kicked at the bobcat with powerful feet.
I heard him cry out, I thought he was done.

But the cat rose from the pain and fled to the trees,
then the deer looks in our direction.
The sweat and blood glistening from her damp coat,
and I feel in some way we have a connection.

I can see she is tired, it shows in her eyes,
And her heart I see pounds in her chest.
When out of the shadows, to our surprise,
a fawn appears to suckle her breast.

Then the doe calls out with a high-pitched bleat,
I step back with Roxy, what should we do,
when from under a bush I see little feet,
and as the grass parts, there are two.

The fawns are beautiful with their furry white spots,
feeding on her breast they are hungry no doubt,
while mom lowers her head to inspect not just one,
and gives each a loving nudge with her soft wet snout.


message 31: by Glenda (new)

Glenda Reynolds (glendareynolds) | 1021 comments Mod
I loved that, Terry, and I could just picture that in my mind. Based on true events?


message 32: by TERRY (new)

TERRY | 596 comments Mod
A WAR LETTER

Dear Mom and Dad,
 
The war is done, my past is through,
but mom there's something great I must ask of you.
 
I have a friend, oh such a friend, he has no home you see,
so mom I would like to bring him home with me.
 
Dear Son, we don't mind if someone comes home with you,
I'm sure he could stay perhaps a week or two.
 
Dear Mom, there's something you must know,
now please don't be alarmed, my friend in battle recently
was hurt and lost his arm.
 
My Son, don't be ashamed to bring him home with you,
perhaps he could stay and visit for a day or two.
 
Dear Mom, but mother, he's not just a friend, he's like a brother too,
that's why I want him with us and like a son to you.
Before you give your answer mom, there's something I should say,
my friend fought in a battle in which he lost his leg.
 
Dear son, it hurts so much to say my answer must be No,
for your dad and I have not the time the boy is crippled so.
 
So months go by, a letter comes that says, "Your son has died"
and when they read the cause of death, the shock was suicide.
 
Days later when the casket came draped in our country's flag,
they saw their son lying there without an arm or a leg.

Author unknown


message 33: by TERRY (new)

TERRY | 596 comments Mod
Thanks Glenda. I am glad you liked.

Glenda wrote: "I loved that, Terry, and I could just picture that in my mind. Based on true events?"


message 34: by Glenda (new)

Glenda Reynolds (glendareynolds) | 1021 comments Mod
So sad. I had read this poem before or at least in story form. I'm in awe of when a soldier with prosthetics on both legs says that he or she would do it again for our country. And it's a shame what our country is becoming.

TERRY wrote: "A WAR LETTER

Dear Mom and Dad,
 
The war is done, my past is through,
but mom there's something great I must ask of you.
 
I have a friend, oh such a friend, he has no home you see,
so mom I would..."



message 35: by Glenda (new)

Glenda Reynolds (glendareynolds) | 1021 comments Mod
I just finished my work at home shift here on a Saturday. I am in tears because several bad things are happening. Not only is there much political unrest continued burning of cities, Antifa plotting to kill people, and mass illegals coming across the US border, but also two people in my circle have cancer. My oldest brother is fighting throat cancer near his spine. He cannot eat or speak. Shae Hammerick who is a member of this writing forum is in her last stages of cancer - it is winning. She is in the hospital now. Your prayers are coveted for both of them. My orange and white cat Opie was diagnosed with an enlarged heart and fluid in his lungs. He will be euthanized 2 days from now. So I'm in a dark, sad place right now. I need your virtual hugs, support, and prayers. Thank you all for listening.


message 36: by TERRY (new)

TERRY | 596 comments Mod
I understand, Glenda. So sorry to hear about your brother and the cat. I already knew about Shae. May God's love envelop you during this time of sadness. Know that you are not alone.


message 37: by Glenda (new)

Glenda Reynolds (glendareynolds) | 1021 comments Mod
So I'm right now in a mode of getting inspired to write. I've collected some pretty computer wallpapers about writing or spiritual affirmations. I just now purchased an ebook by Joanna Penn "The Successful Author Mindset" for only $.99 cents. It covers subjects of perfectionism, fear of failure, fear of judgement, your inner critic, "I keep starting things and not finishing them," "Why write? There are too many books in the world?" and many more topics. If you are interesting in getting this ebook, here is the link: www.amazon.com/Successful-Author-Mind... And then on another note, while I was purchasing the above ebook, the hubby was looking at a Key West video that featured the inside of Ernest Hemmingway's house. I wanted to do a screen capture of a cat sitting on the table was his old typewriter still sits. https://youtu.be/b6xpZAlcWZU I hope everyone is having a good week.


message 38: by Glenda (new)

Glenda Reynolds (glendareynolds) | 1021 comments Mod
"Do you need someone to make you a paper badge with the word 'WRITER' on it before you can believe you are one?" Stephen King, On Writing


message 39: by TERRY (new)

TERRY | 596 comments Mod
You might need to send me one or two every week.


Glenda wrote: ""Do you need someone to make you a paper badge with the word 'WRITER' on it before you can believe you are one?" Stephen King, On Writing"


message 40: by Glenda (last edited Jun 14, 2021 05:19AM) (new)

Glenda Reynolds (glendareynolds) | 1021 comments Mod
TERRY wrote: "You might need to send me one or two every week.."

Me too. I started reading Joanna Penn's ebook "The Successful Author Mindset". Authors who have written and published many books still suffer from thoughts of being a fraud or inadequate. She goes into that in the first chapter. So we are not alone.


message 41: by TERRY (last edited Jun 14, 2021 05:58AM) (new)

TERRY | 596 comments Mod
I never give it much thought, really. Because I just write the monthly stories for fun, a hobby. Gives me something to do and keeps the old brain active. I already started on the July story. Thinking back on the June story....... I wish I had started the story in the ravine with the accident. Too late now.


Glenda wrote: "TERRY wrote: "You might need to send me one or two every week.."

Me too. I started reading Joanna Penn's ebook "The Successful Author Mindset". Authors who have written and published many books st..."



message 42: by Glenda (last edited Jul 02, 2021 03:01PM) (new)

Glenda Reynolds (glendareynolds) | 1021 comments Mod
My cousin Brooke Fox has joined our Writers 750 group here, but she goes by the name of Emerald Fox. She writes poetry and is an entrepreneur of sorts. She also started a blog at https://www.fromcountrytocityslicking... in the hopes of helping young adults who are "struggling artists...I love to inspire others who are in the same boat that I was and am happy to give direct advice where and when I can. Send me a comment with your thoughts and I will get back with you as soon as I can!" Anyway, she sometimes posts her poetry on Facebook. I believe that her poem below is referring to her grandmother (my grandmother's sister) who passed away the day before Christmas Eve at the end of 2020. I have fond memories of Katherine. she was like a second mother to me. R.I.P.

The Porch ~
In the gathering darkness, lit by a flame
Casting its glow upon the spirit of the coming rain.
Grandmother gave me the flickering souls,
Flanking the porch I love so dear, that fill it with a
Presence only angels
Seem to hold. They see into the coming rage, and storms prevail but cannot
Augment, the beauty of the two orbits which look so much like eyes
Moving back and forth beneath the perilous sky,
Calming the storm before it hits,
Keeping my soul in place, a firmament with
Stable and implacable resilience,
Until the surges of the demonic force begin to
Die, and everything is gray and perfectly sweet again . . .
But Grandmother, the sky reflects the calm upon my face,
yet still I hate the fact that it is
YOUR candles which are the God of Light
That sheltered me from the rage tonight. I’d rather not remember where they came from, for you
Left me without a trace, you see, except for the
Stupid candle that will never dream
As you once did for me. Or make up stories for me from
Something white and totally inane. Or give me butterscotch underneath the
church pew. That was a cheap replacement, Grandma, to keep me happy, and hold the storm away from
Me.


message 43: by TERRY (new)

TERRY | 596 comments Mod
I never knew my grandmothers. Oh, I remember their faces but that is about all. Lovely read on the poem.


message 44: by Emerald (new)

Emerald Fox (fromcountrytocityslicking) | 6 comments Hi everyone,
Thank you for the invite, Glenda! It's an honor and pleasure to be able to chat with all of you and be part of a writer's group again. I'm planning to take Glenda's invite as a sign to get help me reconnect with a part of myself that I've been sadly neglecting! Also thanks for the poem-share. Yes, 'Lady Katherine,' was the most wonderful person I've ever met, and a huge influence in my life (Glenda, I don't know if you know any of this, but she used to pull me under the covers when I was a kid and make up stories out of the top of her head. Sometimes it would go on for hours into the night!) I was probably nine or ten, maybe even older after she stopped- but then she did it with my sister. When I was a kid she was in her seventies, and had more energy than anyone I've met, saving your own grandmother. Ginger was well known for being a spark, and even though I didn't spend a whole lot of time with her, Dad was nuts about her and I know she had a ton of personality and flare.

If you want to hear more stories about Lady Katherine just ask me. I will have to put them all down to print at some point. Hoping to join in for one of your short story contests, SOON, if not this time then for next month.

Cheers!
Emerald ~


message 45: by Emerald (new)

Emerald Fox (fromcountrytocityslicking) | 6 comments Hey again, Glenda,
I'm just now getting to the point of looking at all these threads. I realize that you posted this now a month ago, but just know I am sorry to hear about all of the unrest in your home and in your heart (and praying that much of it has dissipated since you wrote this). It's been a very tumultuous and rocky year for me, too, in a lot of ways. I can totally relate to and understand the loss of a cat. Cat's are healers, and in my opinion one of the most intuitive and intelligent animals on the planet. I've had them ever since I was a baby in the crib, and even in most of my travels and my time in NYC have been compelled to adopt, because I can never be without one.

Much love ~


message 46: by Emerald (new)

Emerald Fox (fromcountrytocityslicking) | 6 comments Hi Terry,
Wow! This is SUCH a poem. Really cut me. The author is unknown? It's jarring.


message 47: by Emerald (new)

Emerald Fox (fromcountrytocityslicking) | 6 comments Based on true events I assume? Wow, that is so beautiful . . . I'm glad the mother deer made it!


message 48: by TERRY (new)

TERRY | 596 comments Mod
Hello Emerald. Yes it is. I have had this poem tucked away in my document folder for years. Glad to see you will join us in a monthly short story contest soon. T................

Emerald wrote: "Hi Terry,
Wow! This is SUCH a poem. Really cut me. The author is unknown? It's jarring."



message 49: by TERRY (new)

TERRY | 596 comments Mod
Well Emerald. The characters are real. My dog and I like our walks through the woods. It is not unusual to see deer along the way and I have seen Bobcat and hear them at night. I just looked out and saw a mother deer and her fawn checking to see if there was any corn left from this morning's feed. I will go out soon and give them more before bedtime. Thanks for commenting. T......

Emerald wrote: "Based on true events I assume? Wow, that is so beautiful . . . I'm glad the mother deer made it!"


message 50: by Glenda (new)

Glenda Reynolds (glendareynolds) | 1021 comments Mod
Emerald wrote: "Hi everyone,
Thank you for the invite, Glenda! It's an honor and pleasure to be able to chat with all of you and be part of a writer's group again. I'm planning to take Glenda's invite as a sign ..."


Your comments about Catherine put a smile on my face. No, I never heard that about her that she told you stories. That is so neat. She was a special lady & my grandma Ginger too. And just yesterday Bob & I were talking about my cat Opie that died May 3rd. Bob made the comment that we should've had him euthanized on the spot after we got the news about his heart and lungs. No way! We needed to make sure of our decision and say our goodbyes. I cried again yesterday. Following Opie's death, Shae Hamrick who was an Admin in this group and who published our 31 Days of October series (see these on the bottom of our home page) that collaborated with me, passed away on Mother's Day this year. She will be missed.


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