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The Ten Thousand Doors of January
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Ten Thousand Doors of January > TTDJ: Precisely how I feel about a new (physical) book

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Gregory (gfitzgeraldmd) | 40 comments I came across this paragraph early in the novel and it summed up for me how I feel about holding a new book. The prose was so perfect and beautiful, I had to highlight it and share here:

"understand that page riffling is an essential element in the process of introducing oneself to a new book. It isn't about the reading the words; it's about reading the smell, which wafts from the pages in a cloud of dust and wood pulp. It might be expensive and well bound, or it might smell of tissue-thin paper and blurred two-color prints, or of fifty years unread in the home of a tobacco-smoking old man. Books can smell of cheap thrills or painstaking scholarship, of literary weight or unsolved mysteries.'

I think I'll have to give this book a 5 star review based on that quote alone...


Lee  (the Book Butcher) (butcherfromgeorgia) that quote stood out for me as well. I noticed a few meaningful quotes in this I was not expecting. the writing is so beautiful with alliterations and imagery.


kvon | 562 comments This book is a love affair for reading. She really gets into the specialness of the perfect words.


Seth | 413 comments My problem with this quote, which also struck me, is that the publisher chose to make this a deckle-edged hardcover. Deckled edges might make it feel 'older' - like from back in the days when you had to cut the pages - but they actively resist the subtle art of page-riffling in a way that infuriates me. We have the technology to make all the pages the same length, I think we should embrace it.


Aaron (oldwindways) | 140 comments kvon wrote: "This book is a love affair for reading."

You put it more elegantly than I did when I came across those passages. In my mind I labeled that as "book porn," and I was totally there for it.

Seth wrote: "My problem with this quote, which also struck me, is that the publisher chose to make this a deckle-edged hardcover."

I am listening to the audiobook, so I entirely missed out on that physical experience with this story. I also was not familiar with the term "deckle-edged"; I have seen it before but did not realize the purpose/explanation.


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