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Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea
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Buddy Reads > Buddy Read: 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea

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Vickie (bookfan4ever) | 447 comments Some snails will be doing a buddy read on this starting June 1st (or feel free to start this week). Anyone is welcome to join, and remember to use spoilers for anything specific. Happy Reading!


Candace (candywilliams) | 413 comments Will someone please tell me how to do the spoiler thingy?


Vickie (bookfan4ever) | 447 comments It is listed under the (some html is ok) tab, but basically whatever you need to hide should be done like this... < spoiler > "write details here"< /spoiler > but remove all the spaces in between the brackets. Before posting, you can always hit the preview button (next to the post button) to make sure you did it right. Hope that makes sense. 😊


Candace (candywilliams) | 413 comments Perfectly, thank you!


Vickie (bookfan4ever) | 447 comments Welcome 👍😁


Candace (candywilliams) | 413 comments For the most part I enjoyed 20,000 Leagues. I was enjoying the gorgeous descriptions of underwater scenes, even including the proper names of the flora and fauna. These scenes were excessive, however, so I skipped those parts as the book neared its end. They would have been glorious reading if I'd been a marine biologist, I'm sure.

Electricity was the secret and exciting futuristic thing that made this story sci-fi because at the time it was written, all the possible uses of electricity were unknown. When I finished the book, I watched the 1954 movie. Since the movie was made post-WWII, and electricity was in widespread use, the secret and exciting futuristic thing was atomic energy. Fair enough. Other than that, there were very few similarities with the book.

I thought the overall idea was excellent and that the plot was good. Some of the characters were bland, imo. In sci-fi, that's not unusual, though. (Kirk Douglas's characterization of Ned Land was outstanding and stole the show, btw. In fairness, I imagine the script called for a much different Ned Land than what was written in the the book.)

Captain Nemo and Prof. Aronnax had lengthy intellectual conversations which I enjoyed. It wasn't until near the end of book that they seemed to develop more emotional personalities. I think that was a realistic way to write people like that.

Overall, I was amazed by the scope of the book for its time. What did you all think?


Fred Alexander (tumbleweed984gmailcom) | 125 comments Hi ; are you out there Keli ? I seem to remember that you had quite a reading list for May. Let me know when you are ready to start 20 Thousand Leagues. :-)


Fred Alexander (tumbleweed984gmailcom) | 125 comments Candace wrote: "For the most part I enjoyed 20,000 Leagues. I was enjoying the gorgeous descriptions of underwater scenes, even including the proper names of the flora and fauna. These scenes were excessive, howev..."
Well!! That was an elegant review, Candace. I've been waiting for Kali to finish her reading list from May, and I'm hoping she'll be finished soon but I'm going to wait. I remember seeing the movie when I was young . I wasn't much of a reader back then and I think it would be fun to watch it again .


Candace (candywilliams) | 413 comments Fred wrote: "Candace wrote: "For the most part I enjoyed 20,000 Leagues. I was enjoying the gorgeous descriptions of underwater scenes, even including the proper names of the flora and fauna. These scenes were ..."

Well thank you, Fred. Not sure about "elegant," but ... this was a good read, and an amazing feat for its time. Have you started on it yet?


message 10: by Fred (new) - rated it 4 stars

Fred Alexander (tumbleweed984gmailcom) | 125 comments Hi Candace; I have started on it, I'm going slowly and looking up the names of the devices , places and vessel names. As you mentioned in your review of the book, electricity and it's uses was a big technological deal aswell as . the metalurgy of copper, steel . Another book I'm reading, The Great Influenza talks a lot about the medical advancements also being made during that time . Perhaps your book described the French submarine that was the inspiration for Verne's Nautilus, the breathing apparatus and the batteries. All so very interesting and different from the world WE live in . The HMS Beagle had circumnavigated in 1831-1836, and the SM Novara circumnavigated in 1857-1859 , both ships returning with news of islands, plants and creatures previously unknown. . I would like to discuss the book more with you and Keli if she is still interested. :-)


Candace (candywilliams) | 413 comments Fred wrote: "Hi Candace; I have started on it, I'm going slowly and looking up the names of the devices , places and vessel names. As you mentioned in your review of the book, electricity and it's uses was a bi..."

Fred, I'm afraid you could be looking up things from that book for the rest of your life. There's so much material like that! I'm sure you will enjoy the book immensely. The author astounded me with his knowledge and imagination.


Vickie (bookfan4ever) | 447 comments I've been reading it as well, and holy moly... the science jargon, or what I like to call "verbal diarrhea"! Sheesh. Yeah, I'm skimming a lot of those parts. 😆 But, otherwise, I am enjoying it.😊


Candace (candywilliams) | 413 comments Vickie wrote: "I've been reading it as well, and holy moly... the science jargon, or what I like to call "verbal diarrhea"! Sheesh. Yeah, I'm skimming a lot of those parts. 😆 But, otherwise, I am enjoying it.😊"

The science jargon didn't bother me as much as the endless recitations of the undersea flora and fauna, with Latin names included.


Vickie (bookfan4ever) | 447 comments Yes, I'm including all of that together, lol.😉


message 15: by Fred (new) - rated it 4 stars

Fred Alexander (tumbleweed984gmailcom) | 125 comments Hi Candace and Vickie , I would like to toss in an opinion or two if I may; I am enjoying the scientific digressions, Capt. Nemo is talking to another scientist , scientific jargon , one-upmanship and probably egos play a part in their relationship. Tom Clancy did a lot of "data dumping" in his novels too and the information can add a sense of authority and authenticity to a story. I think it was a brave and fortuitous idea for Verne to include this information in the first "scientific fiction " story. I also enjoyed the internet information on the Plongeur, the French submarine upon which the Nautilus is based I'm not quite halfway through the story . Verne's intelligence
and imagination are impressive.


Vickie (bookfan4ever) | 447 comments Oh, no doubt, totally agree. It's just not my cup of tea, personally. 🤷🏼‍♀️


message 17: by Fred (new) - rated it 4 stars

Fred Alexander (tumbleweed984gmailcom) | 125 comments Candace wrote: "Fred wrote: "Hi Candace; I have started on it, I'm going slowly and looking up the names of the devices , places and vessel names. As you mentioned in your review of the book, electricity and it's ..."
You're right, Candace, I COULD spend the rest of my life researching the information in some stories, But I won't. It's a wise man that knows when enough is enough....It's a wiser man that knows who's who and what's what and what it is that is what it is. I'm workin'on it.


message 18: by Fred (new) - rated it 4 stars

Fred Alexander (tumbleweed984gmailcom) | 125 comments Vickie wrote: "I've been reading it as well, and holy moly... the science jargon, or what I like to call "verbal diarrhea"! Sheesh. Yeah, I'm skimming a lot of those parts. 😆 But, otherwise, I am enjoying it.😊"
Hi Vickie, how many stars would you give 20 Thousand Leagues ? Is there anything you would do to improve the story ? Maybe have more activity with the Professor and the Capt. ? Several scenarios come to mind that would change the story line from (or to include) science fiction and piracy , revenge , extorsion , maybe some murder . I can see that the characters seem polite and well behaved so far and not much character development. I'm about half way through the story .


Candace (candywilliams) | 413 comments Fred wrote: "Candace wrote: "Fred wrote: "Hi Candace; I have started on it, I'm going slowly and looking up the names of the devices , places and vessel names. As you mentioned in your review of the book, elect..."

LOL I know you wont' spend your whole life, but it sure has a lot of stuff in there to look up if one wanted. You are a wise man. I thoroughly enjoyed the banter between Nemo and Aranaxx (was that his name?) Yes, lots. of one-ups-manship and all that. Sci-fi isn't usually big on character development. I wonder if that's because Vern didn't do it. I always assumed that the focus was supposed to be on the sci-fi part of the story since most fans were most interested in that. All in all, it's a stunning book for its time.


Vickie (bookfan4ever) | 447 comments Fred wrote: "Vickie wrote: "I've been reading it as well, and holy moly... the science jargon, or what I like to call "verbal diarrhea"! Sheesh. Yeah, I'm skimming a lot of those parts. 😆 But, otherwise, I am e..."

Hi Fred. I'm still reading, so not sure yet how I'll rate it. It's a great classic story, and I appreciate the writing of the time. The info dumps don't bother me much, I just skim those parts. I know they add to the story. It's similar to when I read Michael Crichton. He has a lot of info dumps too, but I still really enjoy his stories. As far as this story, yeah, the characters are somewhat underdeveloped, but that's typical. We'll see how it goes for the rest of the story.😊


message 21: by Fred (new) - rated it 4 stars

Fred Alexander (tumbleweed984gmailcom) | 125 comments Vickie wrote: "Fred wrote: "Vickie wrote: "I've been reading it as well, and holy moly... the science jargon, or what I like to call "verbal diarrhea"! Sheesh. Yeah, I'm skimming a lot of those parts. 😆 But, othe..."

Vickie wrote: "Fred wrote: "Vickie wrote: "I've been reading it as well, and holy moly... the science jargon, or what I like to call "verbal diarrhea"! Sheesh. Yeah, I'm skimming a lot of those parts. 😆 But, othe..."
Hi Vickie; I think I'm going pretty easy on Jules Verne because it's a trailblazing book. Sometimes, when I'm doing other things, I think about some of the characters doing something besides being polite and obedient. I enjoy Michael Crichton also. Maybe one of his books would be a good buddy read or book of the month ?


Vickie (bookfan4ever) | 447 comments Absolutely!😊


Candace (candywilliams) | 413 comments I highlighted this prescient observation by the Professor on my Kindle:

"The Captain was right. The barbarous and inconsiderate greed of these fishermen will one day cause the disappearance of the last whale in the ocean."

I think the really good sci-fi authors are time travelers. :)


message 24: by Pien (new) - rated it 3 stars

Pien | 442 comments I’ve started reading this one yesterday, like it! (But reading like a 🐌)


message 25: by Fred (new) - rated it 4 stars

Fred Alexander (tumbleweed984gmailcom) | 125 comments Candace wrote: "I highlighted this prescient observation by the Professor on my Kindle:

"The Captain was right. The barbarous and inconsiderate greed of these fishermen will one day cause the disappearance of th..."


I haven't gotten to that part yet, but I certainly agree with you! : -c) do you like the moustache ?


message 26: by Fred (new) - rated it 4 stars

Fred Alexander (tumbleweed984gmailcom) | 125 comments Pien wrote: "I’ve started reading this one yesterday, like it! (But reading like a 🐌)"

Hi Pien ! Are you reading 20 Thousand Leagues on the Gutenberg Project or some other way? I'm glad to hear that you're enjoying the story.


message 27: by Pien (new) - rated it 3 stars

Pien | 442 comments Hi Fred, I was so lucky to find a dutch translation in the national online library! Otherwise it would be very difficult to read I think. Even snailer ;-) I would read it...


message 28: by Pien (new) - rated it 3 stars

Pien | 442 comments Hi all,
I've just finished this book and it was a nice read, but two things
(view spoiler)
Do you have thoughts about these points?


message 29: by Fred (new) - rated it 4 stars

Fred Alexander (tumbleweed984gmailcom) | 125 comments Pien wrote: "Hi all,
I've just finished this book and it was a nice read, but two things
1. My book started in the Nautilus, and it was never explained how the three men came there. Did I miss the start or was ..."


Hi Pien; Chapters 1-7 set the stage for the story, it seems to me that there are about 42 pages missing from the beginning of your book. I'm just starting the second half of the book so I can't address the ending. A lot of my enjoyment of the story comes from checking into the names of the vessels and locations and scientific devices Verne describes. Although I no longer read techno-thrillers, I do enjoy the technical descriptions that some writers engage in .


message 30: by Pien (new) - rated it 3 stars

Pien | 442 comments Thanks Fred, so I did miss part of the story! Isn’t that the strangest thing?
I did google some facts that I thought were interesting, but not as intensive as you are. I liked the fish, water and science descriptions, but in the end I started skipping those parts a little. If I had read this in English, I wouldn’t have understood much with all those different kinds of fish and whales and plants...


message 31: by Fred (new) - rated it 4 stars

Fred Alexander (tumbleweed984gmailcom) | 125 comments Pien wrote: "Thanks Fred, so I did miss part of the story! Isn’t that the strangest thing?
I did google some facts that I thought were interesting, but not as intensive as you are. I liked the fish, water and ..."

I agree Pien, I think he overdid the information and descriptions but there must have been a huge amount of "scientific information " available to him at the National Library in Paris . The HMS Beagle had circumnavigated the globe in 1831-1836, and the SM Novara circumnavigated in 1857-1859. I wonder if Verne struggled with deciding what to include and what to omit . Although I have a copy of the book, the print is small so I am reading it on my notebook computer at the Gutenberg Project. I am so grateful to you for mentioning that because the print is much larger and easier on my eyes.


Vickie (bookfan4ever) | 447 comments Phew, finally finished. Oy vey, there's a lot of hours of my life I'll never get back, lol.😆 This was a brutal read for me. Way too much repetition and listing of aquatic life. I mean, I get it, but too much narrative and not enough action for me. The last few chapters were the best, in my opinion. And Pien, to answer your question about the ending (view spoiler) Hope that helps clarify it for you.😊


Vickie (bookfan4ever) | 447 comments Candace wrote: "For the most part I enjoyed 20,000 Leagues. I was enjoying the gorgeous descriptions of underwater scenes, even including the proper names of the flora and fauna. These scenes were excessive, howev..."

I forgot to mention that I watched both the 1954 AND 1997 movies. I definitely enjoyed the movies more than the books. The '54 movie was closer to the book. The '97 movie added a romance element, being that the Professor had a daughter join him with Ned on the sub (Conseil was not in this one).😊


Candace (candywilliams) | 413 comments Vickie wrote: "Candace wrote: "For the most part I enjoyed 20,000 Leagues. I was enjoying the gorgeous descriptions of underwater scenes, even including the proper names of the flora and fauna. These scenes were ..."

Interesting! the book needed some of these elements that the movies added, imo!


message 35: by Fred (new) - rated it 4 stars

Fred Alexander (tumbleweed984gmailcom) | 125 comments Candace wrote: "Vickie wrote: "Candace wrote: "For the most part I enjoyed 20,000 Leagues. I was enjoying the gorgeous descriptions of underwater scenes, even including the proper names of the flora and fauna. The..."

Hi Candace and Vickie. I'm going to finish 20,000 Leagues this afternoon. I have been enjoying the book. I think the book is a combination "scientific fiction ", and also a travelogue. His descriptions are interesting and I'm left wondering where he got his travel information. His history of the Suez Canal was enjoyable. I only saw the 1954 Walt Disney movie with Kirk Douglas. I do think his personal servant Conseil was over the top though. It was a good book and I enjoyed reading it. I may read some of Verne's other books since they are on Gutenberg . I will look forward to buddy reading congo with you guys in July. :-)


Candace (candywilliams) | 413 comments Fred wrote: "Candace wrote: "Vickie wrote: "Candace wrote: "For the most part I enjoyed 20,000 Leagues. I was enjoying the gorgeous descriptions of underwater scenes, even including the proper names of the flor..."

Kirk Douglas stole the show. He was a young hunk, and the hubs and I kept giggling at the beefcake scenes - “oh dear, his shirt fell off again.” LOL I mean Hollywood had to do something to keep the viewing public in their seat...

I wondered, too, where Vern acquired all that info on life forms in the various seas.

Looking forward to another buddy read.


message 37: by Fred (new) - rated it 4 stars

Fred Alexander (tumbleweed984gmailcom) | 125 comments Candace wrote: "Fred wrote: "Candace wrote: "Vickie wrote: "Candace wrote: "For the most part I enjoyed 20,000 Leagues. I was enjoying the gorgeous descriptions of underwater scenes, even including the proper name..."
Hey Candace and Vickie ( and anyone else ), I received my copy of "Congo" by Michael Crighton today. Are you guys still interested ?


Vickie (bookfan4ever) | 447 comments Yep, works for me Fred.😊👍


Candace (candywilliams) | 413 comments Me, too!


Vickie (bookfan4ever) | 447 comments I'll start a new post then.😊👍


message 41: by Fred (new) - rated it 4 stars

Fred Alexander (tumbleweed984gmailcom) | 125 comments Candace wrote: "Me, too!"

Wondermous !! ( I like that word )


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