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Wealth & Economics > Flexible work arrangements

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message 1: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 14956 comments Coronavirus boosted by technological advances that enable distant work call for a substantial shift of work patterns, especially with regard to "office jobs" and "e-commerce". Some companies and governments encourage flexible/from home/short but intensive week arrangements, others may still be hesitant. Is it just a need of the hour or an accelerator for a tectonic change in the work and trade organization for decades to come? What do you think?


message 2: by Philip (new)

Philip (phenweb) | 0 comments Many companies will not return to providing office space commercial property renters may be in trouble alongside retail


message 3: by Nik (last edited May 26, 2020 12:53AM) (new)

Nik Krasno | 14956 comments Philip wrote: "Many companies will not return to providing office space commercial property renters may be in trouble alongside retail"

The real dimension of the trouble will dawn a little later when businesses may start to crumble en masse. Meanwhile Hetrz went for Chapter 11 https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articl...


message 4: by Philip (new)

Philip (phenweb) | 0 comments Many large businesses are just hanging on, hoping the situation will improve. many of these businesses are built on debts - debts they can no longer service.
Airlines leasing or buying planes
Hotels with mortgages
Any company with a business loan who cannot re-finance


message 5: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 14956 comments Philip wrote: "Many large businesses are just hanging on, hoping the situation will improve. many of these businesses are built on debts - debts they can no longer service.
Airlines leasing or buying planes
Hotel..."


I'd only add that not only large, but rather any-size


message 6: by Leonie (new)

Leonie (leonierogers) | 1579 comments I think some types of jobs have changed forever. It will be interesting to see the way forward as it evolves.


message 7: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5791 comments And don't you think that there will be push-back from people who actually like going in to work and interacting with colleagues? Who don't want to be at home while working and find it distracting?


message 8: by Leonie (new)

Leonie (leonierogers) | 1579 comments I think it's more about not having to be in the same building. Many of our office workers here, work in cities. I live in a rural area, and I've met quite a number of people who relocated during the lockdown to live with loved ones, and worked very successfully from a rural area.

I suspect that it could mean (and here's hoping that it does) that some erstwhile city dwellers might relocate to smaller centres, and work out of rural properties - not homes, but sites of business.


message 9: by J.J. (new)

J.J. Mainor | 2250 comments Facebook has already announced it will let people continue to work remotely, but it will reduce salaries for anyone who moves somewhere with a lower cost of living.

https://deadline.com/2020/05/facebook...


message 10: by Philip (new)

Philip (phenweb) | 0 comments J.J. wrote: "Facebook has already announced it will let people continue to work remotely, but it will reduce salaries for anyone who moves somewhere with a lower cost of living.

https://deadline.com/2020/05/fa..."


That would depend on contract with employee. We have some roles that have extra allowances based on location - central London - so if redeployed or new office allocated allowance does not apply


message 11: by J.J. (new)

J.J. Mainor | 2250 comments I would guess their current employment arrangement requires them to physically come to the office, which requires them to live within commuting distance. If he offers them a new arrangement, then it would logically follow that it entails accepting a new "contract" to get that new arrangement. In that case, and since the employees are not unionized, he can make the demand for reduced salaries. After all, if the employees don't want to see the salary reduced based on where they work from, then they don't have to take the remote-work offer.


message 12: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5791 comments Would you rather work from home where there are constant family distractions and limited social engagement, or would you rather go to work where family distractions are absent and you can interact with colleagues? Don't get me wrong: I'd love to see more people working from home and not commuting and polluting. I'm just not convinced that people will be happy with that.


message 13: by J.J. (new)

J.J. Mainor | 2250 comments It's no different than working at "work" where you have chatty coworkers who want to waste your time because they don't want to do their jobs...or they're always bothering on how to do something they should know how to do but don't because they either don't bother learning since they always have you to lean on, or they're too stupid to remember.


message 14: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 14956 comments It's also similar to a distant learning: some can self-discipline to handle it rather well, others need a uni's class framework


message 15: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5791 comments My point is that people may not be happy working at home. I remember stay-at-home parents celebrating the first day of school because they'd no longer have to entertain the kids. Now even working parents have to entertain the kids. And being at home is very stifling for extroverts. I don't think everyone will be happy working at home.


message 16: by Nik (new)

Nik Krasno | 14956 comments Scout wrote: "....I don't think everyone will be happy working at home."

Not everyone, for sure. Not every employer would prefer distant work of employees, even where possible, either..


message 17: by Philip (new)

Philip (phenweb) | 0 comments My company has announced that offices will remain closed until Sep


message 18: by J.D. (new)

J.D. Cunegan (jdcunegan) | 62 comments I've been working from home since mid-March (note: college athletics is a strange field to work in when there are no games), and my office has a plan to slowly phase back into re-opening starting June 15; it's mostly staggered schedules (i.e., certain people come in Monday-Wednesday-Friday, others Tuesday-Thursday), shorter hours, masks, daily temperature checks, hand sanitizer, etc. I've enjoyed working from home (for the most part), but there are benefits to being in the office sometimes. I do appreciate my employer taking safety into such account, and the fact that they sought feedback from all of us before coming up with a plan; it wasn't simply "The office is open again on this day, and you better be there, no matter what."


message 19: by Papaphilly (last edited Aug 21, 2020 12:56PM) (new)

Papaphilly | 3282 comments My wife has been home since March and she is not being considered to return until the new years at the earliest. I go to work and do not want to work from home. Work is work and home is home and I do not mix the two. I suspect that some will continue to work from home at least part time even when this is done.


message 20: by Scout (new)

Scout (goodreadscomscout) | 5791 comments Working from home would have been a dream for me, an introvert.


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