Play Book Tag discussion

33 views
Footnotes > Photo of Mt Everest now visible from Katmandu

Comments Showing 1-26 of 26 (26 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Joanne (new)

Joanne (joabroda1) | 7248 comments Sure some of you would like to see this-sad that it won't last long

https://snowbrains.com/everest-visibl...


message 2: by Ellen (new)

Ellen | 2090 comments What a glorious picture!


message 3: by Book Concierge (new)

Book Concierge (tessabookconcierge) | 5641 comments Oh, my!


message 4: by Charlotte (new)

Charlotte | 1493 comments Wow... I've seen a lot of articles and pictures like this about the drop in pollution and the ability to see mountains from farther away and such.

I agree, it's sad that it won't last long. I wish a lesson could hit home for more about what an impact we have on the air/world around us.


message 5: by Jeremiah (new)

Jeremiah Cunningham | 691 comments Joanne wrote: "Sure some of you would like to see this-sad that it won't last long

https://snowbrains.com/everest-visibl......"


This is a beautiful sight and one of many during this time. I am saddened by the excuses and rationalizations that people make for not believing in the need to protect our environment. Americans are simply spoiled and unwilling to sacrifice in the least to make our world a better place (well not all Americans are this way, but society as a whole is.)

Protecting and improving our environment should not be a political issue but rather a public health issue. However, seeing as we cannot seem to get that through our brains in this country I was saddened that a true proponent of the environment like Tom Steyer did not even get any traction among the democratic party in this primary cycle. Such a sad state.


message 6: by Joanne (new)

Joanne (joabroda1) | 7248 comments @ J.W. -I agree with your stance, it not being political. My daughter and I talked about this when I showed her the picture.


message 7: by Charlotte (new)

Charlotte | 1493 comments I decided to google: things you can see now there is no pollution and one that struck me...

Delhi residents are shocked by how blue the sky really is: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/08/wo...


message 8: by Karin (last edited May 20, 2020 04:37PM) (new)

Karin | 6926 comments Charlotte wrote: "I decided to google: things you can see now there is no pollution and one that struck me...

Delhi residents are shocked by how blue the sky really is: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/08/wo......"


Yes, India has terrible pollution--it's the third largest producer of acid rain, too.

J.W. wrote: "Joanne wrote: "Sure some of you would like to see this-sad that it won't last long

https://snowbrains.com/everest-visibl......"


I love this view!

The US produces 15 percent of Global CO2 and China 30 percent. Interestingly the Russian Federation only produces 5 percent. This is only ONE type of serious emission problem, though. Having too many greenhouse gases is very serious, but there are other extremely serious pollution problems that are responsible for huge environmental problems as well. When it comes to the emissions that produce acid rain, one of the biggest offenders is the global economy--the largest 15 container ships are worse than all of the world's cars combined. Add to this the fact that even though the pollution controls in the States aren't high enough, they are far lower in China and other manufacturing countries in various parts of the world. If the world cut global shipping in half, it would have an enormous impact on pollution. BUT, they have cut the amount of the sulphur compounds to only 1/7th for container ships unless they have the right scrubbers, so this will help as long as it's monitored correctly.

Because the things that contribute to acid rain aren't converted instantly Canada's acid rain comes from the US, and acid rain in Scandinavia comes from the UK.

8 top producers of acid rain
1. China (and they produce acid rain not just in their country, but all across Asia)
2. USA
3. India
4. Russia
5. Japan
6. Brazil
7. Germany
8. South Korea


message 9: by LibraryCin (new)

LibraryCin | 8129 comments Charlotte wrote: "I agree, it's sad that it won't last long. I wish a lesson could hit home for more about what an impact we have on the air/world around us...."

1000% agreed!

And wow... that photo. Amazing!


message 10: by LibraryCin (new)

LibraryCin | 8129 comments J.W. wrote: "I am saddened by the excuses and rationalizations that people make for not believing in the need to protect our environment. Americans are simply spoiled and unwilling to sacrifice in the least to make our world a better place (well not all Americans are this way, but society as a whole is.)..."

Yes, people don't want to change their lifestyle. :'(


message 11: by Shelly (new)

Shelly | 525 comments Opinion piece in NYTimes today about the need to reduce meat consumption, for many reasons, including environmental/climate change.

"If cows were a country, they would be the third-largest greenhouse gas emitter in the world."

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/21/op...


message 12: by Karin (last edited May 21, 2020 05:46PM) (new)

Karin | 6926 comments Shelly wrote: "Opinion piece in NYTimes today about the need to reduce meat consumption, for many reasons, including environmental/climate change.

"If cows were a country, they would be the third-largest greenho..."


And most of that is not in the States, either! There are many cows all over the world.

BUT All of agriculture only produces 10 percent of the worlds greenhouse gases, so that is really not the solution. Transportation causes 28 percent, electricity production 27 percent, industry 22 percent and residences 12 percent. It is actually greener for the planet for humans to eat omnivorous diets LIGHT on meat than if the world were to go vegan. We need cleaner electrical production and far less driving and transporting, less commuting by car, etc. It's not for naught that my son commutes by bus rather than by car, and if more people did that it would help a great deal. Or by commuter rail. Or working more days from home if your job can work that way. Plus, not living long distances from work.

description When I was a kid a significantly smaller percentage of people commuted long distances to work.


message 13: by NancyJ (last edited May 21, 2020 08:01PM) (new)

NancyJ (nancyjjj) | 4997 comments I love that there are some good things coming out of this pandemic.

I especially think it's a good thing that there aren't crowds of people trying to climb Mount Everest right now. Last year it was insane that so many people were climbing at once, and stepping over the dead bodies. For what?


message 14: by Shelly (new)

Shelly | 525 comments I do believe that we are going to see so many changes in our lives as the result of the pandemic, and many that we can't even predict right now. And some that we can predict are going to have a domino/cascading effect.

Many more people are going to work from home, either part time or full-time. In NYC, that means the commercial real estate market is going to see many more vacancies. Less commuters, less cars on the roads, but also fewer worker bees supporting small businesses in the city.

Who could have predicted that bicycles would become the new toilet paper! I love seeing that change. Will it last? Will cities build/support bike lanes?

And yes nobody is getting killed on Everest, but what about the Sherpas that have no work?

@Karin, I had been moving toward a diet light on meat before the pandemic. On my last library run before it closed, I borrowed VB6 (vegan before 6) by Marc Bittman and I am sorta adapting that approach..... although I do like a fried egg for breakfast!

So much to think about now and as we emerge from lockdown.


message 15: by Meli (new)

Meli (melihooker) | 3154 comments This is truly amazing... and also, as many others have said, sad at the same time because we will go right back to where were were before, already heading that way.


message 16: by Karin (last edited May 22, 2020 09:49AM) (new)

Karin | 6926 comments Shelly wrote: "I do believe that we are going to see so many changes in our lives as the result of the pandemic, and many that we can't even predict right now. And some that we can predict are going to have a dom..."

That's great! I would suffer severe malnutrition without meat because I am now allergic to nuts (with an epi-pen for that) and legumes and I cannot eat eggs or dairy (not even goat milk and I like that even better than cow milk). The irony is that I was easily able to all of those as a kid and most in my youth, although I've had environmental allergies all my life.

I tend to be extremely wary of extreme diets, either vegan or the opposite after studying animal biology, including anatomical and physiological adaptations and needs for different types of diets plus I am keenly aware of the needs of people with allergies and other physical situations due. The planet was fine with humans being omnivores before modern industrialization and transportation :)


message 17: by Theresa (new)

Theresa | 6326 comments Farmer's daughter here -- meat will always be in my diet, but it has always been balanced with lots of vegies, legumes, etc. Not just carbs. And I absolutely do NOT get vegan ... my family, dairy farmers, would have STARVED if everyone suddenly had become vegan! Besides that, I just don't get cutting out dairy unless you have serious diet issues relating to an inability to consume them. Cows naturally generate milk from eating - grass in pastures, feed etc. Cows MUST be milked twice a day. Dairy products contain all kinds of good things for you that your body needs throughout your life.

The issue is balance in your diet -- not eating too much of any one thing, but keeping a balance of foods in your diet. And not buying prepared foods but cooking using fresh ingredients. That cake made from flour etc. from your pantry is way better for you than that boxed cake with too much overly sweet frosting. Support local producers to encourage raising more foods with fewer additives. But also remember that the local farmer can't feed, clothe, house, and educate his family on the 1 quart of milk every couple of weeks that I would buy. That farmer has to be able to ship his milk to the urban centers thus requiring shelf life beyond what is natural.

And for those that read Locally Laid: How We Built a Plucky, Industry-changing Egg Farm - from Scratch and other similar books (Animal, Vegetable, Miracle: A Year of Food Life comes to mind), something you learn is that much of the feed etc. needed for 'organic' is obtained from China etc.

I truly believe that a lot of the cancers and such we see in the world today are the result of additvies etc. in the food sources, and that I was blessed to grow up on a farm where we butchered most of our own meat, grew many of our own vegies and had fruit trees and berry patches ready to hand. I suspect it gave me a leg up. But my father used pesticides, and chemical fertilizers to boost the fertility of the land. So who knows?

Step down off my soap box. Food and diet choices are very personal and always touchy with people. I just think the farmer side gets lost in the conversation.


message 18: by LibraryCin (new)

LibraryCin | 8129 comments Shelly wrote: "I do believe that we are going to see so many changes in our lives as the result of the pandemic, and many that we can't even predict right now. And some that we can predict are going to have a dom..."

I hope so, but the pessimist in me feels like most people will go back to their normal as soon as they can. Many are chomping at the bit to do so. :-(


message 19: by Shelly (new)

Shelly | 525 comments (sigh)


message 20: by LibraryCin (new)

LibraryCin | 8129 comments Karin wrote: "The planet was fine with humans being omnivores before modern industrialization and transportation..."

But modern industrialization is the problem. Factory farms.

I am not vegetarian, nor vegan, but I keep inching closer, due to the animal cruelty in the industry.

The hardest for me to give up will be cheese and eggs. Working on the eggs. I still do ice cream. I like the alternatives, but they are so expensive, and I eat a lot of ice cream.


message 21: by LibraryCin (last edited May 22, 2020 06:01PM) (new)

LibraryCin | 8129 comments Theresa wrote: "Cows naturally generate milk from eating - grass in pastures, feed etc. Cows MUST be milked twice a day. ..."

But, the problem comes when the babies are taken away so the cows can produce milk for the humans. Let the babies have the milk. Again, the problem is really the factory farms.

ETA: The little bit of meat that I do eat (what I buy for home) comes from a small(er) local farm.


message 22: by Karin (last edited May 22, 2020 06:54PM) (new)

Karin | 6926 comments LibraryCin wrote: "Karin wrote: "The planet was fine with humans being omnivores before modern industrialization and transportation..."

But modern industrialization is the problem. Factory farms.

I am not vegetari..."


Yes, that is correct but not just for meat for plant foods as well. Most GMO plants are designed to take Round Up, etc. which causes other issues, but I know that in Massachusetts, lawn chemicals are one of the largest polluters of water, and that includes insecticides as well as fertilizers Factory farming helps the very large companies make more money. There is a lot of fossil fuel used in running those enormous combines and other farming machines, I am guessing. I always like it when I pass a field on a small local farm with cows standing in grass that is long enough for them to eat (I just drove by one earlier this week).

Oh, did I mention I try to buy organically raised food? It's not always really well done with the federal laws. In the States things like the California & Oregon standards are higher, or were the last time I checked. But no more than one percent of American agricultural land is devoted to organic farming.

https://www.extension.iastate.edu/agd... is a link for fuel used per acre for crops. I am NOT advocating that we go back to doing everything by hand and horse/oxen/etc, but just pointing out that meat production doesn't make up the entire 10 percent :). THEN there is the shipping of food around the world, etc which might fall under transportation.

I try to buy local if I can, but since grain isn't grown here, etc, that is impossible.


message 23: by Theresa (new)

Theresa | 6326 comments 20 or more years ago there was a fascinating article in the New York Times Sunday Magazine about USA's obsession with green lawns and what it cost in every way. Now I hated mowing and maintaining the lawn at the farm, always swore that when I had a house it would have a ground cover like myrtle vines...clearly was not then thinking about living in a NYC apartment and thus avoiding the issue completely.


message 24: by LibraryCin (new)

LibraryCin | 8129 comments Karin wrote: "Yes, that is correct but not just for meat for plant foods as well. Most GMO plants are designed to take Round Up, etc. which causes other issues, but I know that in Massachusetts, lawn chemicals are one of the largest polluters of water, and that includes insecticides as well as fertilizers Factory farming helps the very large companies make more money. ..."

Agreed. I do try really hard to get the organic stuff.


message 25: by LibraryCin (last edited May 23, 2020 12:02PM) (new)

LibraryCin | 8129 comments Theresa wrote: "20 or more years ago there was a fascinating article in the New York Times Sunday Magazine about USA's obsession with green lawns and what it cost in every way. Now I hated mowing and maintaining t..."

If I had the energy, I would love to rip out my lawn. I hate it, and I hate taking care of it! LOL!

There are now much more environmentally-friendly clover lawns. I'll try to find a link, later, but I have a busy afternoon...)


message 26: by Karin (last edited May 23, 2020 01:08PM) (new)

Karin | 6926 comments Theresa wrote: "20 or more years ago there was a fascinating article in the New York Times Sunday Magazine about USA's obsession with green lawns and what it cost in every way. Now I hated mowing and maintaining t..."

PLUS, clover used to be included with grass seed since it fixes nitrogen and feeds that into the soil for the grass. It was taken out and then labelled a weed by the same companies that sell herbicides because those chemicals kill it. Plus, that means more $$ for them in selling you nitrogen fertilizers since the clover is gone.

Plus all of the WATER it takes! I remember when our lawn was put in (it was new construction) and how our water usage soared from watering! I quit watering the lawn after a few years and never, ever water it. What grows, grows and there are many pretty wild flowers in it now. Our entire yard is a safe haven for insect pollinators.

My parents don't want one, but they really need to put water meters in more homes because when you pay the bill you see what happens. Our bill after that summer was significantly higher than what it is today even with all of the increases in rates.

As for our vegetable garden, I prefer to use a hose and water myself rather than run a sprinkler partly for that reason, and partly so that each area gets the right amount of water.

We won't win any prizes for beauty, but our "lawn" is green most of the year most years--the weed type grasses don't need as much water.

Okay, so the environment is one of my many soap boxes. I come by having strong opinions honestly as there are others in my family like this through the family tree, even if we don't all agree on all of them :)


back to top